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1

Chileshe, Nicholas, Raufdeen Rameezdeen, M. Reza Hosseini, Steffen Lehmann y Chika Udeaja. "Analysis of reverse logistics implementation practices by South Australian construction organisations". International Journal of Operations & Production Management 36, n.º 3 (7 de marzo de 2016): 332–56. http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/ijopm-01-2014-0024.

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Purpose – A large number of benefits have been reported when reverse logistics (RL) is fully implemented in the construction industry. However, RL is yet to become common place in the construction sector, particularly in Australia. The particular sub-sector in which RL operates is small and weak and the remainder of the sector must embrace and accommodate it comfortably. Research is lacking on how to promoting RL in the construction industry. Very little has been done to identify the current practices that have the potential to promote RL industry-wide. The purpose of this paper is to identify the practices that work well in the sector, a strategy could be mapped out to promote RL to all stakeholders. Design/methodology/approach – In order to fill the above gap, the present study used a mixed method approach to gather and evaluate current practices and their potential to promote RL in South Australia’s construction industry. Practices that were identified using a comprehensive literature review were evaluated with a questionnaire survey and series of interviews involving construction professionals. Findings – The findings are that practices facilitating deconstruction is the most important, followed by practices facilitating the use of salvaged materials in new construction to promote RL in South Australia. Awareness of deconstruction benefits, challenges and procedures at the organisation level and facilities and services at industry level were associated with RL implementation. Availability of salvaged materials in the market was found to influence its use in new construction and as a consequence its demand. Designing for reverse logistics is another practice that could facilitate deconstruction and the onus of its promotion lies mainly with the designers. Research limitations/implications – This research was confined to one state in Australia. As such the generalisation to other states and other countries should be treated cautiously. Practical implications – The findings of this study can help inform the industry and its stakeholders on areas that they need to concentrate more on to make the South Australian construction industry a fully RL integrated one. To that end the authors propose some recommendations arising from the findings reported here. Originality/value – This study makes a contribution to the body of knowledge on reserve logistics within a previously unexplored South Australian context. In addition, the study provides valuable insights into the contribution of RL practices to the construction industry.
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Biggs, Herbert C., Vaughn L. Sheahan y Donald P. Dingsdag. "Risk Management and Injury Prevention: Competencies, Behaviours, and Attitudes to Safety in the Construction Industry". Australian Journal of Rehabilitation Counselling 13, n.º 2 (1 de septiembre de 2007): 63–67. http://dx.doi.org/10.1375/jrc.13.2.63.

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AbstractOriginally presented at the National Injury Management and Prevention Conference: Transition and Change, on April 27, 2006, which was held at the Hyatt Regency, Adelaide, South Australia. Reprinted with the permission of the authors.Work in the Australian construction industry is fraught with risk and the potential for serious harm. The industry is consistently placed within the three most hazardous industries to work along with other industries such as mining and transport (National Occupational Health and Safety Commission, 2003). In the 2001 to 2002 period, construction work killed 39 people and injured 13,250 more. Hence, more effort is required to reduce the injury rate and maximise the value of the rehabilitation/back-to-work process.
3

Bills, Kym. "Building a world-class Australian decommissioning industry". APPEA Journal 58, n.º 2 (2018): 690. http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/aj17154.

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Collaboration in decommissioning offshore infrastructure could save both industry and taxpayers billions of dollars and facilitate new industries and exports for Australia, especially in the Asia-Pacific region. At the end of the liquefied natural gas (LNG) plant construction boom, Australia must not miss out on this major new opportunity. The 2017 bid for Commonwealth funding to establish a Decommissioning Offshore Infrastructure Cooperative Research Centre (DOI-CRC) involved more than 30 participants and many other collaborators. High-level commitments were made by Chevron, Woodside, Shell, BHP, ExxonMobil, Quadrant, The University of Western Australia, Curtin University, the University of New South Wales, Deakin University, Australian Maritime College, CSIRO and Australian Institute of Marine Science. A Perth-based DOI-CRC was supported by National Energy Resources Australia, National Offshore Petroleum Safety and Environmental Management Authority and other Australian Government bodies and by the Western Australian Government and its Chief Scientist and agencies but did not receive sufficient support from the CRC Advisory Committee. Meeting decommissioning challenges in the North West Shelf, Bass Strait and the Northern Territory in a timely, robust, scientific, efficient and cost-effective manner that contributes to a sustainable marine environment should draw upon and augment international best practice with local capability and expertise. Good science and innovative engineering are needed to support regulatory approval of options such as ‘rigs to reefs’ and commercial opportunities such as in waste management and expanded fishing and tourism. APPEA and operators wish to maintain DOI-CRC’s momentum and learn from UK research arrangements through funding marine science projects. But we must be much broader if we are to build a sustainable world-class Australian decommissioning industry. In particular, we need to work more closely with state and federal regulators and policymakers and undertake more engineering science research and innovation.
4

Ma, Le, Chunlu Liu y Anthony Mills. "Construction labor productivity convergence: a conditional frontier approach". Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management 23, n.º 3 (16 de mayo de 2016): 283–301. http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/ecam-03-2015-0040.

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Purpose – Understanding and simulating construction activities is a vital issue from a macro-perspective, since construction is an important contributor in economic development. Although the construction labor productivity frontier has attracted much research effort, the temporal and regional characteristics have not yet been explored. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the long-run equilibrium and dynamics within construction development under a conditional frontier context. Design/methodology/approach – Analogous to the simplified production function, this research adopts the conditional frontier theory to investigate the convergence of construction labor productivity across regions and over time. Error correction models are implemented to identify the long-run equilibrium and dynamics of construction labor productivity against three types of convergence hypotheses, while a panel regression method is used to capture the regional heterogeneity. The developed models are applied to investigate and simulate the construction labor productivity in the Australian states and territories. Findings – The results suggest that construction labor productivity in Australia should converge to stable frontiers in a long-run perspective. The dynamics of the productivity are mainly caused by the technology utilization efficiency levels of the local construction industry, while the influences of changes in technology level and capital depending appear limited. Five regional clusters of the Australian construction labor productivity are suggested by the simulation results, including New South Wales; Australian Capital Territory; Northern Territory, Queensland, and Western Australia; South Australia; and Tasmania and Victoria. Originality/value – Three types of frontier of construction labor productivity is proposed. An econometric approach is developed to identify the convergence frontier of construction labor productivity across regions over time. The specified model can provides accurate predictions of the construction labor productivity.
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Shokri-Ghasabeh, Morteza y Nicholas Chileshe. "Knowledge management". Construction Innovation 14, n.º 1 (6 de enero de 2014): 108–34. http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/ci-06-2013-0026.

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Purpose – A research study has been undertaken at the University of South Australia to introduce application of lessons learned process in construction contractors ' bidding process in the context of knowledge management. The study aims to identify barriers to effectively capture lessons learned in Australian construction industry and how knowledge management can benefit from lessons learned application. Design/methodology/approach – The research study has been undertaken through conducting a “methodological triangulation” and “interdisciplinary triangulation”. This involved an extensive literature review of knowledge management, organisation learning, lessons learned and associated processes and administration of a questionnaire to a sample of construction contractors operating in Australia to elicit opinions on the main barriers to capturing lessons learned, practices such as existence and retention of documentation procedures. A total of 81 useable responses were received from 450 organisations. Response data were subjected to descriptive and inferential statistics with correlation analysis to examine the strength of relationship among the barriers. Findings – The top-3 barriers to the effective capturing of lessons learned were “lack of employee time”, “lack of resources” and “lack of clear guidelines”, whereas, “lack of management support” was the least ranked barrier. The study established that despite the majority of the ACCs having formal procedures for recording the tenders submitted and their outcomes, only a minority actually retained the lessons learned documentation for each project. The larger contractors were found to be more aware of the importance of lessons learned documentation. A comparative analysis with previous studies also found a disparity in the ranking of the barriers. Research limitations/implications – The majority of the participants were small construction contractors in Australia. The reason is that the researchers were not aware of the contractors ' size prior to inviting them for participation in the research study. Second the findings may not generalize to other industries or to organisations operating in other countries. Originality/value – The findings of this survey help ACCs to understand the importance of lessons learned documentation as part of lessons learned implementation and identify the barriers to effectively document their lessons learned. The study provides insights on the barriers and proposes advocated solutions in form of drivers and enablers (critical success factors) of organisational learning capturing among the Australian construction contractors. By reviewing the current literature, “post-project reviews” and “lessons learned” as important elements of organisation learning knowledge transfer, are addressed. Finally, contribution of this study to knowledge and practice has been discussed in this paper.
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Enya, Andrew, Shane Dempsey y Manikam Pillay. "A Study Investigating How the Characteristics of High Reliability Organisations Can Be Measured in the Construction Industry in Australia". International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, n.º 21 (9 de noviembre de 2020): 8273. http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218273.

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Construction activities involve a lot of risk as workers are exposed to a wide range of job hazards, such as working at height, moving vehicles, toxic substances, and confined spaces. The hazards related to a construction project are mostly unpredictable because construction projects move quickly due to project deadlines, and changing work environments. As a result of this, the industry accounts for one of the highest numbers of work-related claims, and the fourth highest incidence rate of serious claims in Australia. This research investigates how key safety management factors can measure the characteristics of high reliability organisations (HROs) in the construction industry in New South Wales Australia. To address the problem, a model is presented that can predict characteristics of HRO in construction (CHC). Using structural equation modeling (SEM), and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), the model and measurement instruments are tested and validated from data collected from construction workers. The results identified the factors that effectively measure CHC, and the findings can also be used as a safety management strategy and will contribute to the body of knowledge in research.
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Chileshe, Nicholas, Raufdeen Rameezdeen, M. Reza Hosseini y Steffen Lehmann. "Barriers to implementing reverse logistics in South Australian construction organisations". Supply Chain Management: An International Journal 20, n.º 2 (9 de marzo de 2015): 179–204. http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/scm-10-2014-0325.

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Purpose – This paper aims to present a survey of the perceptions of the barriers to implementing reverse logistics (RL) practices in South Australian (SA) construction organisations. Despite the extensive research on forward logistics and RL, there is a paucity of studies that examine the barriers to implementing RL particularly within the Australian construction industry. This study builds on the ongoing research being undertaken by the authors, entitled “Designing for reverse logistics (DfRL) within the building life cycle: practices, drivers and barriers”, which is examining the best practices and drivers that could be used as a “road map” for developing appropriate solutions for the successful implementation of RL. Design/methodology/approach – Data were collected by utilising a triangulated data collection approach, a literature review and 49 questionnaires. The review of the literature identified 16 barriers to implementing RL. The quantitative survey data were subjected to descriptive and inferential statistics with correlation analysis to examine the relationships between different pairs of variables comprising RL’s critical barriers. Findings – The following barriers were indicated as most significant: lack of incorporation of salvaged materials by designers; regulation restrictions to usage of recovered materials and components; potential legal liabilities; higher costs; and longer-time association with deconstructing buildings. The least ranked barriers were mostly drawn from the operational and industrial categories as being: organisational lack of support for deconstruction due to incompatible design; lack of organisational support for deconstructing buildings due to higher health and safety risks; and inadequate skills and experience for deconstruction (operational). The industrial barrier was related to “higher costs of salvaged materials in comparison to virgin products”. Research limitations/implications – First, the reported findings are focussed on one study that used questionnaire surveys within the construction industry; therefore, the results may not be generalisable to other contexts. Further, studies should be conducted and extended to other industrial sectors beyond the construction industry. Second, the quantitative study (n = 49) used a smaller sample, and the survey items were based on the review of the literature. Practical implications – The identified barriers could be used as a “road map” for the development of appropriate solutions for the successful implementation of RL, and to improve the environment-related decision-making processes of contractors. Originality/value – This study makes a contribution to the body of knowledge on the subject of RL within a previously unexplored SA context. In addition, the study provides some insights on the contributory effects of the barriers to the implementation of RL. It is the first work undertaken to determine the barriers to the adoption of RL within the SA construction industry.
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Forsyth, Anthony. "Industrial legislation in Australia in 2016". Journal of Industrial Relations 59, n.º 3 (22 de mayo de 2017): 323–39. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022185617693876.

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After three years of trying, the Coalition Government finally succeeded in obtaining passage of several key workplace reform statutes in 2016. This followed the outcome of the federal election held on 2 July, delivering the Government a differently composed Senate and a new opportunity to secure support for its legislative program. This review article explains key aspects of the industrial legislation passed by federal Parliament in 2016, including statutes abolishing the specialist road transport industry tribunal, re-establishing the Howard-era regulator for the construction industry, and setting up a new agency to enforce enhanced governance and accountability standards for registered unions and employer organisations. Legislative amendments aimed at resolving the long-running bargaining dispute in Victoria’s Country Fire Authority are also considered, along with the Government’s muted response to the 2015 Productivity Commission review of the workplace relations framework. The article then examines developments at state level, including a major rewrite of Queensland’s industrial legislation, structural changes in New South Wales, and proposed changes to long service leave and the labour hire sector in Victoria. It concludes by noting the irony that just as the federal Government has tasted some success after a long legislative ‘dry spell’, its labour law reform agenda appears limited and piecemeal.
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Windapo, Abimbola Olukemi y Jack Steven Goulding. "Understanding the gap between green building practice and legislation requirements in South Africa". Smart and Sustainable Built Environment 4, n.º 1 (18 de mayo de 2015): 67–96. http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/sasbe-01-2014-0002.

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Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine green building legislation requirements and practices in the construction project execution stage within the context of the South African construction industry. The rationale for this examination rests with the perception that the implementation of green practices (per se) has been recognised as being “behind” the legislation enacted to control the design and construction of green buildings. Design/methodology/approach – The research process consisted of a literature review to identify existing green building legislation and practices applicable to the project execution phase. This was supported by a sequential mixed-method research approach, which involved a survey of contracting companies based in the Western Cape Province of South Africa. Purposive sampling was used to undertake focused interviews with management staff and site operatives. Findings – Research findings established a number of issues, not least: a gap between green building practices and legislation requirements; a high degree of unawareness of green building legislation/practices by construction company stakeholders; selective implementation of health and safety legislative requirements; that management staff had a more “positive” attitude to green building practices than site-based staff who tended to be less motivated and open to such practices. Research limitations/implications – Results from this study are considered generalisable with the sample frame only. Research inference and projections should therefore only be made within this set, and not to the wider population of South African contractors (as this study was limited to the Western Cape Province). Practical implications – Implications from this research are applicable to construction company stakeholders within the population set. Practical considerations include the need to acknowledge a formal commitment to developing a sustainable built environment – especially cognisant of the gap between practices on site and green building legislation requirements. Moreover, this lack of awareness in respect of green building practices and legislation requirements impinges upon several wider areas, not least: construction company stakeholders’ positioning, health and safety practices; managerial and operational staff perceptions, and stakeholders’ willingness and motivation to proactively address these gaps. Social implications – Government bodies and allied professionals in charge of construction industry development are encouraged to consider the implementation of green building legislation requirements on construction sites. This reflection should encourage engagement through formative legislative provision and transparent awareness campaigns. Originality/value – This work is original insofar as it directly addresses the alignment of legislation to current practices within the context of the South African construction industry. However, similar exercises have been undertaken on green building legislation in other countries such as USA, UK and Australia.
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Hasan, Abid, Abbas Elmualim, Raufdeen Rameezdeen, Bassam Baroudi y Andrew Marshall. "An exploratory study on the impact of mobile ICT on productivity in construction projects". Built Environment Project and Asset Management 8, n.º 3 (9 de julio de 2018): 320–32. http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/bepam-10-2017-0080.

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Purpose The issue of low productivity has remained a very stern and chronic problem in construction projects. Previous studies have found poor communication as one of the leading causes of low-construction productivity. Recent advances in the field of information and communication technologies (ICT) have the potential to enhance communication and access to information in construction projects. However, the implications of the use of mobile ICT on construction productivity have not been investigated in sufficient depth, especially from the perspectives of its users, i.e. construction management (CM) professionals. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach A focus group session involving ten experienced CM professionals from different organisations of the South Australian construction industry was moderated by a group of four researchers to gather data on mobile ICT usage and its implications for construction productivity. Findings Lack of training and guidelines on effective applications of these technologies to construction projects is a major bottleneck. Results indicate that despite noticeable advances in mobile ICT, differences in usage style and user attitude have limited their overall impact on productivity. Research limitations/implications This paper is based on data gathered from CM professionals working in the South Australian construction industry. Practical implications The study highlights the importance of strategising the use of mobile ICT to achieve the desired productivity rates through policy, training, work-life balance, and deeper and wider understanding of these technologies. Originality/value The study examines the perceptions of CM professionals on the usefulness of mobile ICT in construction projects and its implications for construction productivity.
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Selleck, Roberta. "A step change in safety performance through critical control management". APPEA Journal 57, n.º 2 (2017): 539. http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/aj16192.

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The oil and gas construction industry experiences a high rate of unnecessary work-related fatalities. The International Association of Oil and Gas Producers (IOGP) reported 54 fatalities in 40 fatal incidents in 2015. When assessing this against the use of IOGP Life-Saving Rules (LSRs), which contractors are required to adopt, the IOGP found that of the 40 fatal incident descriptions in 2015, at least 73% related to the IOGP LSRs. A program to apply a critical control management (CCM), or safety cased, approach to fatal hazards was trialled on construction sites in Australia and South Africa ranging from large power station constructions to offshore hook-up and commissioning to brownfields maintenance. The results demonstrated a step change in the safety performance occurred on projects where the CCM program was implemented. These projects have each demonstrated a significant improvement in recordable injuries, increases in hazard reporting and awareness, and almost complete elimination of high-potential incidents. Further investigation of the reasons for these results is the subject of a PhD project and includes: (1) understanding how the CCM program improves hazard awareness and decision making of frontline supervisors; (2) determining the effects CCM has on the safety climate of the organisation as detailed focus is applied on the effectiveness of controls that drive leadership decisions; and (3) investigating how CCM improves leadership at all levels of the organisation due to better information that allows tangible action to be taken to improve control effectiveness. This paper describes the progress of CCM program development, details present results and lessons learned, and provides a context for how CCM programs can be implemented in other organisations.
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Munyasya, Brenda y Nicholas Chileshe. "Towards Sustainable Infrastructure Development: Drivers, Barriers, Strategies, and Coping Mechanisms". Sustainability 10, n.º 12 (22 de noviembre de 2018): 4341. http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/su10124341.

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Despite the advent of the new Sustainable Development Goals, and noted benefits around the social, economic, and environmental aspects, the sustainable infrastructure development (SID) implementation process faces a number of challenges. Moreover, while there is a plethora of studies around sustainable infrastructure, there are limited studies undertaken on the influencing drivers and barriers particularly within the South Australian construction industry. This paper is aimed at filling that knowledge gap by identifying and ranking the drivers and barriers of SID implementation in South Australian construction organizations. A sequential mixed methods approach comprising questionnaires and interviews was conducted among construction professionals. The highly ranked drivers were identified as innovation, standardization of the word ‘sustainability’ (knowledge improvement), and close interaction of all involved stakeholders. “Lack of steering mechanism”, “multi-disciplinary nature of the word “sustainability”, and “lack of cooperation and networking” were the critical barriers. Suggested strategies and coping mechanisms for overcoming these barriers include instilling sustainability awareness, sustainability specifications, and governance frameworks. Strong and positive relationships were evident amongst all the drivers. This paper provides further insights into the knowledge and awareness of these drivers, which are cardinal to increased uptake of SID by the stakeholders, and barriers to overcome.
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Chileshe, Nicholas, Raufdeen Rameezdeen y M. Reza Hosseini. "Drivers for adopting reverse logistics in the construction industry: a qualitative study". Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management 23, n.º 2 (21 de marzo de 2016): 134–57. http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/ecam-06-2014-0087.

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Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate and analyse the perceptions of South Australian construction practitioners on drivers affecting the implementation of reverse logistics (RL). In this context, RL is defined as the process of moving goods from their typical final destination for the purpose of capturing value or ensuring proper disposal. Design/methodology/approach – Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight practitioners to collect data and the interview transcripts were analysed using the NVivo (version 10) package. Cluster analysis was used to cross-validate the findings and provide an in-depth insight into the findings. Findings – The findings indicate that most of the drivers identified in earlier research are relevant for the construction industry. In addition, the study identified some new drivers that are categorised as “targeted demands by an exclusive clientele”. These drivers were found to be complementary to the economic, environmental and social drivers as previously conceptualised. In addition, a set of factors affecting the strength of drivers that had been overlooked in previous studies emanated from the interview analysis. These include the type of project and the attributes of clients, both of which strongly affect the drivers of RL implementation in construction. Research limitations/implications – The major limitations are the relatively small size of the sample of interviewees and having interviewees from one geographic area with specific socio-economic characteristics. Practical implications – The identified drivers and the clustering of RL themes could be used by practitioners as a “road map” for the development of appropriate solutions to successfully promote RL within the construction industry. Organisational energies could thus be channelled towards the drivers that need the most improvement. Originality/value – The study contributes to this research sphere by employing cluster analysis to customise and contextualise the drivers that were previously identified. The study goes beyond the extant literature by discovering the prominent effects of these drivers on the impact of targeted demands by an exclusive clientele. This could be of great value in terms of creating avenues for future investigations on the topic.
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Talukhaba, Alfred Atsango, Earnest Acheampong y Collins Ogutu Miruka. "Improving time management in the South African construction industry". International Journal of Decision Sciences, Risk and Management 2, n.º 3/4 (2010): 327. http://dx.doi.org/10.1504/ijdsrm.2010.037490.

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Selby Smith, Chris. "Health services management education in South Australia". Australian Health Review 18, n.º 4 (1995): 15. http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/ah950015.

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In December 1994 the Australian College of Health Service Executives (SABranch) sought ?a needs analysis for health management training programs withinSouth Australia?. Although the college was interested in a range of matters, thecentral issue was whether the current Graduate Diploma in Health Administration(or a similar course) would continue to be provided in Adelaide. The college providedbackground material and discussions were held with students, the health industry,relevant professional associations and the universities. This commentary sets out someof the background factors and my conclusions, which have been accepted by the SouthAustralian authorities.
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Ibem, Eziyi O. y Samuel Laryea. "E-tendering in the South African construction industry". International Journal of Construction Management 17, n.º 4 (20 de septiembre de 2016): 310–28. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15623599.2016.1222666.

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Bierman, M., A. Marnewick y J. H. C. Pretorius. "Productivity management in the South African civil construction industry - factors affecting construction productivity". South African Institution of Civil Engineering 58, n.º 3 (2016): 37–44. http://dx.doi.org/10.17159/2309-8775/2016/v58n3a5.

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Hosseini, M. Reza, Nicholas Chileshe y George Zillante. "Investigating the Factors Associated with Job Satisfaction of Construction Workers in South Australia". Construction Economics and Building 14, n.º 3 (13 de septiembre de 2014): 1–17. http://dx.doi.org/10.5130/ajceb.v14i3.4154.

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The purpose of this paper is twofold. Firstly, its aim is to ascertain the major aspects of job satisfaction for South Australian construction workers including the main ramifications of job satisfaction in the working environment. Secondly, it investigates the influence of key age-related factors i.e. chronological age, organisational age and length of service on major aspects of job satisfaction. The collected data for this study comprised 72 questionnaires completed by construction practitioners working at operational levels in the South Australian construction industry. Based on the responses from the target group, this study deduced that job dissatisfaction was predominantly related to the adverse impact on personal health and quality of life. In addition, indifference and the perception of dejection in the workplace are the main consequences of low levels of job satisfaction. Inferential analyses revealed that none of the age-related factors could significantly affect the major aspects of job satisfaction of construction workers in the South Australian context. The study concludes with providing practical suggestions for redesigning human resources practices for increasing the level of job satisfaction within the South Australian construction industry.Keywords: Job satisfaction, workers, age, construction industry, South Australia
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Chancellor, Will. "Drivers of Productivity: a Case Study of the Australian Construction Industry". Construction Economics and Building 15, n.º 3 (31 de agosto de 2015): 85–97. http://dx.doi.org/10.5130/ajceb.v15i3.4551.

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Australian construction productivity has grown slowly since 1985 and remains arguably stagnant. The importance of this study is therefore to examine several factors through to be drivers of construction productivity and to understand possible avenues for improvement. The drivers tested are research and development, apprentices, wage growth, unionisation and safety regulation. Expenditure on research and development and the number of apprentices were found to be drivers of productivity growth in Victoria, New South Wales and Western Australia. These findings are important because collectively, these three states account for a majority of construction activity in Australia.
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Ramaru, Pretty, Matthew Ikuabe, Clinton Aigbavboa y Douglas Aghimien. "Bolstering Measures for Adopting Lean Construction in the South African Construction Industry". International Journal of Productivity and Quality Management 1, n.º 1 (2021): 1. http://dx.doi.org/10.1504/ijpqm.2021.10038552.

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Allan, Cameron, Andrew Dungan y David Peetz. "‘Anomalies’, Damned ‘Anomalies’ and Statistics: Construction Industry Productivity in Australia". Journal of Industrial Relations 52, n.º 1 (febrero de 2010): 61–79. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022185609353985.

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Coggins, Jeremy, Bianca Teng y Raufdeen Rameezdeen. "Construction insolvency in Australia: reining in the beast". Construction Economics and Building 16, n.º 3 (8 de septiembre de 2016): 38–56. http://dx.doi.org/10.5130/ajceb.v16i3.5113.

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Insolvency has become endemic in the Australian construction industry. The scale of the problem has reached such proportions that both the NSW Parliament and the Senate have, in recent times, commissioned inquiries into construction insolvency. This paper aims to identify the reasons as to why the construction industry is so susceptible to insolvency, evaluate the effectiveness of any existing insolvency protection measures available to construction firms, and to identify proposed future measures to address the factors causing construction insolvency. The results of a questionnaire survey designed to discover the extent of the construction insolvency problem, as well as building contractors’ views with respect to the causes and regulation of construction insolvency, in South Australia are presented. The research found that there is an appetite amongst building contractors for the introduction of further regulation to address construction insolvency. Further, although the research found underbidding to be the biggest contributory factor towards construction insolvency, it appears to be the most difficult factor to address through regulation which explains the paucity of recommendations which directly address underbidding emanating from the Senate inquiry in 2015.
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Aghimien, Douglas, Clinton Aigbavboa, Ayodeji Oke y Mbavhalelo Makhwathana. "South African Construction Craftsmen’s Perceptions of Effective Personnel Management Practices". MATEC Web of Conferences 266 (2019): 03020. http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/matecconf/201926603020.

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The recent skill shortage within South Africa has raised the need for proper management of the available craftsmen in the construction industry, as a large portion of work executed within the industry is done by this set of workers. It is based on this knowledge that this study assessed South African construction craftsmen’s perception on how effective personnel management can be achieved. A survey approach was adopted and a structured questionnaire was used in harnessing information form craftspeople within the construction industry in Johannesburg metropolitan area. Data analyses were done using percentage, mean item score and standard deviation. The reliability of the questionnaire was also tested using Cronbach alpha test. The study revealed that provision of competitive pay, effective leadership, recruiting the multi-skilled workers, the reward for dedicated workers, and paying attention to employee’s needs were the key measures for improving the management of personnel. The study further recommends that managers of construction organisations should give attention to the identified measures of improving management of employees and implement them to recruit and retain employees within their organisations. The study adds to existing knowledge on the theme of measures for effective personnel management in the construction industry.
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Mani, Deepa, Kim-Kwang Raymond Choo y Sameera Mubarak. "Information security in the South Australian real estate industry". Information Management & Computer Security 22, n.º 1 (4 de marzo de 2014): 24–41. http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/imcs-10-2012-0060.

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Purpose – Opportunities for malicious cyber activities have expanded with the globalisation and advancements in information and communication technology. Such activities will increasingly affect the security of businesses with online presence and/or connected to the internet. Although the real estate sector is a potential attack vector for and target of malicious cyber activities, it is an understudied industry. This paper aims to contribute to a better understanding of the information security threats, awareness, and risk management standards currently employed by the real estate sector in South Australia. Design/methodology/approach – The current study comprises both quantitative and qualitative methodologies, which include 20 survey questionnaires and 20 face-to-face interviews conducted in South Australia. Findings – There is a lack of understanding about the true magnitude of malicious cyber activities and its impact on the real estate sector, as illustrated in the findings of 40 real estate organisations in South Australia. The findings and the escalating complexities of the online environment underscore the need for regular ongoing training programs for basic online security (including new cybercrime trends) and the promotion of a culture of information security (e.g. when using smart mobile devices to store and access sensitive data) among staff. Such initiatives will enable staff employed in the (South Australian) real estate sector to maintain the current knowledge of the latest cybercrime activities and the best cyber security protection measures available. Originality/value – This is the first academic study focusing on the real estate organisations in South Australia. The findings will contribute to the evidence on the information security threats faced by the sector as well as in develop sector-specific information security risk management guidelines.
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Thomsen, D. A., K. Muir y J. Davies. "Aboriginal perspectives on kangaroo management in South Australia". Rangeland Journal 28, n.º 2 (2006): 127. http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/rj05028.

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Kangaroos are culturally significant to Aboriginal people but Aboriginal people are generally not involved in kangaroo management or in the kangaroo industry. Our research has provided the first opportunity for Aboriginal people in South Australia to present their perspectives on the commercial harvest of kangaroos. Research methods were qualitative, involving consultations with authoritative Aboriginal people about their perspectives, aspirations, and how they see their rights and interests in relation to the commercial harvest of kangaroos. We found diverse views on this topic from Aboriginal research participants. For some Aboriginal people, strict cultural protocols preclude any involvement in the commercial harvest, but for people from other regions where the cultural laws concerning kangaroos are quite different, there is interest in developing enterprises based on kangaroo harvest. Despite the diversity of views about commercial kangaroo harvest, Aboriginal people across South Australia highly value kangaroos, and want to be included in decision-making processes for kangaroo management. There is potential for appropriate engagement of Aboriginal people in kangaroo management through improved communication, greater understanding and respect for the diversity of Aboriginal perspectives and protocols regarding native wildlife.
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Rahmani, Farshid, Tayyab Maqsood y Malik Khalfan. "An overview of construction procurement methods in Australia". Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management 24, n.º 4 (17 de julio de 2017): 593–609. http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/ecam-03-2016-0058.

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Purpose The purpose of this paper is to review the use of various construction procurement systems in the past and present, specifically within the Australian construction industry and to overview the historical development of procurement both globally and in the Australian context through the existing literature. Design/methodology/approach The paper is an in-depth literature review of various construction procurement systems used in the past and present, both in general and within the context of Australian construction industry. Findings The findings suggest that even though relationship-based procurement (RBP) systems offer significant benefits to all project participants, they are unproved by many decision makers because of lack of robust theoretical concept and inability in demonstrating value for money (VfM) for public projects, which would be one of the factors causing move away from RBP in the future. Originality/value This review is one of its kind. There is no such review done before within the context of Australian construction industry in such a detail. This review is a part of a recently completed PhD study.
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Thomsen, D. A. y J. Davies. "Social and cultural dimensions of commercial kangaroo harvest in South Australia". Australian Journal of Experimental Agriculture 45, n.º 10 (2005): 1239. http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/ea03248.

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Kangaroo management is important to the sustainability of Australia’s rangeland landscapes. The commercial harvest of kangaroos assists in reduction of total grazing pressure in the rangelands and provides the potential for supplementary income to pastoralists. Indeed, the commercial kangaroo industry is considered by natural resource scientists as one of the few rural industry development options with potential to provide economic return with minimal environmental impact. While the biology and population ecology of harvested kangaroo species in Australia is the subject of past and present research, the social, institutional and economic issues pertinent to the commercial kangaroo industry are not well understood. Our research is addressing the lack of understanding of social issues around kangaroo management, which are emerging as constraints on industry development. The non-indigenous stakeholders in kangaroo harvest are landholders, regional management authorities, government conservation and primary production agencies, meat processors, marketers and field processors (shooters) and these industry players generally have little understanding of what issues the commercial harvest of kangaroos presents to Aboriginal people. Consequently, the perspectives and aspirations of Aboriginal people regarding the commercial harvest of kangaroos are not well considered in management, industry development and planning. For Aboriginal people, kangaroos have subsistence, economic and cultural values and while these values and perspectives vary between language groups and individuals, there is potential to address indigenous issues by including Aboriginal people in various aspects of kangaroo management. This research also examines the Aboriginal interface with commercial kangaroo harvest, and by working with Aboriginal people and groups is exploring several options for greater industry involvement. The promotion of better understandings between indigenous and non-indigenous people with interests in kangaroo management could promote industry development through the marketing of kangaroo as not only clean and green, but also as a socially just product.
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Detsimas, Nicole, Vaughan Coffey, Zabihullah Sadiqi y Mei Li. "Workplace training and generic and technical skill development in the Australian construction industry". Journal of Management Development 35, n.º 4 (9 de mayo de 2016): 486–504. http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/jmd-05-2015-0073.

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Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate the current skills gap in both generic and skill areas within the construction industry in Queensland, Australia. Design/methodology/approach – An internet-based survey was administered to collect the opinions of construction employees about the workplace-training environment and their perceptions towards training. The survey intended to address the following research questions, specifically in relation to the construction industry. Findings – The survey results reveal that whilst overall participation in workplace training is high, the current workplace training environments do not foster balanced skill development. The study reveals that in the current absence of a formal and well-balanced training mechanism, construction workers generally resort to their own informal self-development initiatives to develop the needed role-specific theoretical knowledge. Research limitations/implications – The findings of the research are based on the data primarily collected in the construction industry in Queensland, Australia. The data are limited to a single Tier 2 construction company. Practical implications – The findings of this study can be utilised to suggest improvements in the current (or develop new) workplace training initiatives. Social implications – The research suggests that workplace training has positive relationship with career growth. The results suggest that in the construction industry, employees are generally well aware of the importance of workplace training in their career development and they largely appreciate training as being a critical factor for developing their capacity to perform their roles successfully, and to maintain their employability. Originality/value – This paper is unique as it investigates the current skills gap in both generic and skill areas within the construction industry in Queensland, Australia. So far no work has been undertaken to identify and discusses the main method of workplace learning within the Tier 2 industry in the context of Queensland Australia.
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Short, J. R. "Construction Workers and the City: 1. Analysis". Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space 20, n.º 6 (junio de 1988): 719–32. http://dx.doi.org/10.1068/a200719.

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The aim in this paper is to highlight the importance of construction workers in the making of the built environment. After a discussion about the general nature of capital—labour relations in the construction industry, an example is taken of the recent history of the Builders' Labourers Federation of New South Wales, Australia. The impact of the union during the Sydney property boom of the 1970s is examined.
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Dumrak, Jantanee, Sherif Mostafa, Imriyas Kamardeen y Raufdeen Rameezdeen. "Factors associated with the severity of construction accidents: The case of South Australia". Construction Economics and Building 13, n.º 4 (11 de diciembre de 2013): 32–49. http://dx.doi.org/10.5130/ajceb.v13i4.3620.

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While the causes of accidents in the construction industry have been extensively studied, severity remains an understudied area. In order to provide more evidence for the currently limited number of empirical investigations on severity, this study analysed 24,764 construction accidents reported during 2002-11 in South Australia. A conceptual model developed through literature uses personal characteristics such as age, experience, gender and language. It also employs work-related factors such as size of organization, project size and location, mechanism of accident and body location of the injury. These were shown to discriminate why some accidents result in only a minor severity while others are fatal. Factors such as time of accident, day of the week and season were not strongly associated with accident severity. When the factors affecting severity of an accident are well understood, preventive measures could be developed specifically to those factors that are at high risk.
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W.D, Thwala. "Motivators of Construction Workers in the South African Construction Sites: A Case Study". Journal of Economics and Behavioral Studies 4, n.º 11 (15 de noviembre de 2012): 625–34. http://dx.doi.org/10.22610/jebs.v4i11.363.

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Construction industry involves laborious and hazard work because of its demands it requires energetic and enthusiastic people and this are the attributes that in most cases young people poses. Construction industry stakeholder should shift their attention and prioritize the motivation of its workers since the industry has a way of cubing poverty and uplifting the county’s economy. This study used data from both primary and secondary sources a special focus on leadership and human resource management context. A survey was conducted with managers and employees regarding motivation on construction site were conducted at different parts of Gauteng. Furthermore, employees work because they obtain something that they need from work and that something obtained from work impacts morale, employee motivation, and the quality of life. Workforce motivation affects productivity. Because most of the activities are done under difficult conditions including harsh weather conditions, to make it attractive employees should be motivated to carry out different activities. Motivators should be in place to improve the chances of the industry’s competitiveness both locally and internationally.
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Chileshe, Nicholas y Theo C. Haupt. "Industry and Academia Perceptions of Construction Management Education: the Case of South Africa". Journal for Education in the Built Environment 2, n.º 2 (octubre de 2007): 85–114. http://dx.doi.org/10.11120/jebe.2007.02020085.

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33

Shooshtarian, Salman, Tayyab Maqsood, Peter SP Wong, Malik Khalfan y Rebecca J. Yang. "Extended Producer Responsibility in the Australian Construction Industry". Sustainability 13, n.º 2 (11 de enero de 2021): 620. http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/su13020620.

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With the COVID-19 outbreak across the world, policymakers and authorities have realised that they cannot solve the emerging issues using conventional policies and practices. COVID-19 has severely affected many industries, including construction and demolition (C&D) waste management and C&D waste resource recovery sector. Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) and schemes alike are policy instruments that prevent waste generation and promote a circular economy in the construction industry. These schemes are long adopted in various countries for different waste streams. EPR policy development and implementation, particularly for C&D waste, is still at an early stage in Australia. This study aims to review the Australian regulatory environment and practice to identify barriers and enablers towards successful policy development and implementation of C&D waste-related EPR. This study is based on secondary data that are publicly available. The document analysis was conducted to identify the level of regulatory and other stakeholders support in Australia. Following three rounds of examination of sources and applying multiple selection criteria, 59 different sources were reviewed in total. The results showed that there is widespread support among different stakeholders to develop EPR and expand the existing regulation to other materials. The barriers were cost and time implications for EPR policy establishment and enforcement, diversity of stakeholders involved, construction product lifecycle, responsibility of manufacturers, complexity in implantation of EPR regulations, modification inbuilt facilities and health and safety issues. Recommendations are made to alleviate these challenges. The outcome of this study could serve as a guideline for designing effective EPR policies.
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Shooshtarian, Salman, Tayyab Maqsood, Peter SP Wong, Malik Khalfan y Rebecca J. Yang. "Extended Producer Responsibility in the Australian Construction Industry". Sustainability 13, n.º 2 (11 de enero de 2021): 620. http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/su13020620.

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With the COVID-19 outbreak across the world, policymakers and authorities have realised that they cannot solve the emerging issues using conventional policies and practices. COVID-19 has severely affected many industries, including construction and demolition (C&D) waste management and C&D waste resource recovery sector. Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) and schemes alike are policy instruments that prevent waste generation and promote a circular economy in the construction industry. These schemes are long adopted in various countries for different waste streams. EPR policy development and implementation, particularly for C&D waste, is still at an early stage in Australia. This study aims to review the Australian regulatory environment and practice to identify barriers and enablers towards successful policy development and implementation of C&D waste-related EPR. This study is based on secondary data that are publicly available. The document analysis was conducted to identify the level of regulatory and other stakeholders support in Australia. Following three rounds of examination of sources and applying multiple selection criteria, 59 different sources were reviewed in total. The results showed that there is widespread support among different stakeholders to develop EPR and expand the existing regulation to other materials. The barriers were cost and time implications for EPR policy establishment and enforcement, diversity of stakeholders involved, construction product lifecycle, responsibility of manufacturers, complexity in implantation of EPR regulations, modification inbuilt facilities and health and safety issues. Recommendations are made to alleviate these challenges. The outcome of this study could serve as a guideline for designing effective EPR policies.
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English, Jane y Paul Bowen. "Overcoming Potential Risks to Females Employed in the South African Construction Industry". International Journal of Construction Management 12, n.º 1 (enero de 2012): 37–49. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15623599.2012.10773183.

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36

Bowen, Paul, Rob Dorrington, Greg Distiller, Harry Lake y Sarika Besesar. "HIV/AIDS in the South African construction industry: an empirical study". Construction Management and Economics 26, n.º 8 (agosto de 2008): 827–39. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01446190802061225.

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37

McGavin, Robert L., Tony Dakin y Jon Shanks. "Mass-timber construction in Australia: Is CLT the only answer?" BioResources 15, n.º 3 (1 de mayo de 2020): 4642–45. http://dx.doi.org/10.15376/biores.15.3.4642-4645.

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Wood-based mass-panels (WBMP) are emerging as an attractive construction product for large-scale residential and commercial construction. Australia is following the lead of Europe and North America with several recent projects being completed using predominately cross-laminated timber panels (CLT). These sawn timber-based panels offer some key advantages to the construction and sawmilling industry. However, veneer-based mass-panel (VBMP) systems could offer additional benefits including the more efficient use of the available forest resources to produce WBMPs that have equivalent to superior performance to CLT. Research to confirm the expected technical viability of veneer-based systems is required. VBMPs could provide a valuable contribution, alongside CLT, to the Australian timber products market.
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Denny-Smith, George y Martin Loosemore. "Integrating Indigenous enterprises into the Australian construction industry". Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management 24, n.º 5 (18 de septiembre de 2017): 788–808. http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/ecam-01-2016-0001.

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Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore the barriers to entry for Indigenous businesses into the Australian construction industry. Design/methodology/approach A national survey was conducted with 33 Indigenous businesses operating in the Australian construction industry. Findings The findings show that Indigenous enterprises face similar challenges to many small non-Indigenous enterprises wishing to enter the industry. These include adjusting to unique construction industry cultures and practices, breaking into existing business networks and building social capital and being under-cut by industry incumbents and competitors when tendering for projects. These barriers are similar to those faced by other non-Indigenous social enterprises, although Indigenous enterprises do appear to experience relatively greater difficulty in starting-up their businesses and in securing sufficient capital, finance and assistance to enable them to scale-up and tender for normal work packages at a competitive price. Research limitations/implications The results are limited to Australian Indigenous businesses. The survey does not allow a comparison of non-Indigenous and Indigenous businesses, although comparison of results with existing non-Indigenous research into small to medium-sized firms in construction does allow some tentative insights. These need to be explored further. Practical implications These results indicate that there are significant barriers to be addressed within the Australian construction industry if government indigenous procurement policies are to achieve their stated aims of increasing the number of Indigenous firms in the industry. The results also have important implications for Indigenous businesses and for non-Indigenous firms operating in the Australian construction industry. Social implications This is an important gap in knowledge to address if countries like Australia are to redress the significant inequalities in income and health suffered by Indigenous populations. Originality/value In countries like Australia, with significant Indigenous populations, governments are seeking to address persistent disadvantage by using new social procurement initiatives to create quasi construction markets for Indigenous enterprises to participate in the construction industry. While there is an emerging body of research into the barriers facing mainstream small to medium-sized enterprises and, to a lesser extent, social enterprises in construction, the barriers to entry facing Indigenous construction enterprises have been largely ignored.
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Osunsanmi, Temidayo Oluwasola, Clinton Ohis Aigbavboa, Ayodeji Emmanuel Oke y Muredini Liphadzi. "Appraisal of stakeholders' willingness to adopt construction 4.0 technologies for construction projects". Built Environment Project and Asset Management 10, n.º 4 (10 de marzo de 2020): 547–65. http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/bepam-12-2018-0159.

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PurposeConstruction 4.0 technology has the capabilities for improving the design, management, operations and decision making of construction projects. Therefore, this study aimed at examining the willingness of construction professionals towards adopting construction 4.0 technologies.Design/methodology/approachThe study adopts a survey design, and construction professionals in South Africa are assessed using a convenience sampling technique through a structured questionnaire. The questionnaire was analysed with SPSS while statistical test like; mean score, t-test and principal component analysis was used to present the data.FindingsThe findings, from the analysis, revealed that the construction professionals are willing to adopt construction 4.0 technologies for construction project. However, the possibility of fully integrating the technologies into the construction industry is low. This is because the major technologies such as; Internet of things, robotics, human-computer interaction and cyber-physical systems that encourage smart construction site are rated as not important by the construction professionals.Practical implicationsIt is believed that the findings emanating from this study will serve as an indicator for investors that are interested in procuring construction 4.0 technologies for the construction industry.Originality/valueThis paper presents a framework for the application of construction 4.0 technologies for the construction industry. It also contributes to the development of digitalising construction industry in South Africa.
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Zou, Jian y George Zillante. "Relationship Contracting: The South Australian Experience - A Case Study". Construction Economics and Building 6, n.º 2 (22 de noviembre de 2012): 20–31. http://dx.doi.org/10.5130/ajceb.v6i2.2981.

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The construction industry has long been accusedof poor performance. The confrontational attitudeof its members and the resultant adversarial atmosphere has been identified as a major factor responsible for this poor performance. A cultural change is required to remove these barriers and to promote optimum project outcomes. Relationship contracting is promoted as a way to support the shift from the adversarial culture to the co-operative and collaborative culture within the industry and the project team.The Adelaide Convention Centre Extensions project was the first in South Australia to be procure und r the principles of relationship contract1ng. Usmg the case study approach, this paper reviews the form of relationship contracting used in this milestone project. The paper documents the lessons learned from this project and makes recommendations that can lead to improvements for future projects.
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Evenden, A. R. "Sea water reverse osmosis - energy efficiency & recovery". Water Practice and Technology 10, n.º 1 (1 de marzo de 2015): 187–95. http://dx.doi.org/10.2166/wpt.2015.023.

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The Adelaide desalination plant, located in South Australia, was designed and built by the AdelaideAqua construction consortium for the South Australian Water Corporation (SA Water), a wholly owned public utility. Construction commenced in 2009 at a green field site (Port Stanvac) south of Adelaide, with drinking water production from October 2011 and full production capability and handover to the plant operator on 12 December 2012. The facility uses 100% renewable energy and provides the people of South Australia with one of the most energy efficient sea water desalination plants in the World. This paper examines the performance of the Adelaide desalination plant in terms of energy efficiency. Specific energy saving technologies and innovations are described, including assessment of design and actual performance. The Adelaide desalination plant has achieved 8% lower energy consumption compared to the project's initial design requirements and the specific energy consumption of 3.48 kWh/m3 compares well with industry benchmark efficiencies.
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Hughes, Rami y David Thorpe. "A review of enabling factors in construction industry productivity in an Australian environment". Construction Innovation 14, n.º 2 (1 de abril de 2014): 210–28. http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/ci-03-2013-0016.

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Purpose – The purpose of the research discussed in this paper is to ascertain the perception, from the project manager's viewpoint, of factors affecting construction productivity in the State of Queensland, Australia. Design/methodology/approach – The research was conducted by a structured questionnaire that was sent to 89 randomly selected construction project managers in Queensland, Australia. This questionnaire requested background information about the respondents and then sought a score, using a 0-4 Likert scale, from each of them with respect to the importance of 47 factors identified from the literature that were considered likely to affect construction productivity. The factors were stratified into primary factors and secondary factors contributing to three of the primary factors. There were 36 responses. These factors were rated by the respondents and then ranked using a relative importance index approach. Findings – The research evaluated the relative importance of the primary factors with respect to their effect on construction productivity. The 15 highest ranking factors are discussed. Three factors – rework, poor supervisor competency, and incomplete drawings – were ranked as having a strong effect on construction productivity. There was also an analysis of the secondary factors in relation to three of the primary factors. Research limitations/implications – The research focused on the State of Queensland in Australia. It had a response rate of 40 per cent. It provides insight into the factors affecting productivity on construction projects in Australia. Further research to investigate the identified factors in depth, using targeted interviews of expert project management professionals, is currently being undertaken. Practical implications – The construction industry can use the findings in this paper as a basis for improving the productivity of construction projects. Originality/value – This research is original research, which has highlighted a number of key areas of which construction productivity can be improved.
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Smith, Anthony D. M. y David C. Smith. "A complex quota-managed fishery: science and management in Australia's South East Fishery. Introduction and overview". Marine and Freshwater Research 52, n.º 4 (2001): 353. http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/mf01029.

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The stock assessment process in the South East Fishery involves scientists, industry, fishery managers, economists and non-government organizations. A comparison with such processes in other countries, where stakeholder involvement ranges from government scientists only to involvement of scientists, industry and conservation non-government organizations, suggests that Australia is the only country in which fishery managers are active and integral stock-assessment participants. In Australia, as in several other countries, the form of advice is comparative (consequences of alternative decisions) rather than prescriptive. Although all approaches have advantages and disadvantages, the South East Fishery process has advantages that appear to clearly outweigh the disadvantages. The advantages include better communication among interest groups, improved ownership of and hence support for outcomes and better interactions among groups. The disadvantages include the cost of the process, lack of consistency among assessments, vulnerability of scientists and the frustrations of industry.
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Chiliya, William, Ellen Chenesai Rungani, Norman Chiliya y Christopher Tarisayi Chikandiwa. "The impact of risk on the financial performance of small medium enterprises in the construction industry in Eastern Cape, South Africa". Risk Governance and Control: Financial Markets and Institutions 5, n.º 3 (2015): 224–34. http://dx.doi.org/10.22495/rgcv5i3c2art8.

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Risk management has become the driving force for business success due to the everchanging business environment. The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of the level of awareness and use of risk management techniques on the financial performance. The data was collected from 82 of Small Medium Enterprises (SMEs) owners/managers in the construction industry in Eastern Cape, South Africa. The results show that the level of awareness and use of risk management techniques have a significant impact on the financial performance of SMEs in the construction industry. The study recommends that the government, tertiary institutions, construction industry development board, and SME owners or managers in the construction industry should work together in improving the level of awareness and use of risk management techniques.
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Bradford, Russell y Rachel Robbins. "A Rapid Assessment Technique to Assist Management of the White Shark (Carcharodon Carcharias) Cage Dive Industry, South Australia". Open Fish Science Journal 6, n.º 1 (8 de marzo de 2013): 13–18. http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1874401x01306010013.

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Port Lincoln, South Australia is the departure port for the only white shark, Carcharodon carcharias, cage dive industry in Australia. Established in the early 1960’s as a niche tourism venture, the industry has recently undergone a rapid expansion to accommodate greater passenger numbers, more tourism operators, and additional infrastructure aimed at capturing a greater proportion of the tourist dollar. However, to date, there has been no assessment of growth in the industry. We have used the operator logbook system, introduced in 2000, as the basis for a rapid assessment of the maturity as well as a conservative estimate of the economic value of the industry, with a focus on 2011. From the logbook system the number of days on-site has increased from an average of 67 days per year prior to 2007 to 287 days on-site in 2011. In 2011 the industry accommodated approximately 5200 passengers with a direct domestic expenditure estimated to be in excess of 6 million AUD. Changes in shark behaviour have been observed following the increase in days on-site. The white shark cage dive industry has reached a stage in its development where increased management is required in order to ensure a viable industry into the future. The rapid assessment technique described herein will allow managers to track changes in cage dive participation rates and quickly respond to changes in the industry.
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Bong, Shanan, Raufdeen Rameezdeen, Jian Zuo, Rita Yi Man Li y Gui Ye. "The designer's role in workplace health and safety in the construction industry: post-harmonized regulations in South Australia". International Journal of Construction Management 15, n.º 4 (2 de octubre de 2015): 276–87. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15623599.2015.1094850.

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47

Langston, Craig y Min Wu. "A Comparative Study of Construction Industry Size and Structure between the UK and Australia and the Significance of Industry Fragmentation". International Journal of Construction Management 6, n.º 1 (enero de 2006): 39–55. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15623599.2006.10773081.

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48

Radujković, Mladen, Mladen Vukomanović y Ivana Burcar Dunović. "APPLICATION OF KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS IN SOUTH‐EASTERN EUROPEAN CONSTRUCTION". JOURNAL OF CIVIL ENGINEERING AND MANAGEMENT 16, n.º 4 (31 de diciembre de 2010): 521–30. http://dx.doi.org/10.3846/jcem.2010.58.

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The importance of performance based benchmarking has become a necessity in a modern construction company and presents a constant challenge for the construction industry. The aim of this paper is to elaborate significance, role and types of Key Performance Indicators (KPI) in the construction industry and show how different management perspectives perceive the indicators. A literature review was carried out in order to generate a listing of KPIs, used among academe and the industry. Afterwards, using surveys and semi‐structured interviews, the data was gathered from more than 30 South‐East European construction companies. Results were analyzed, producing a final set of 37 indicators. This study identified a low level of awareness of KPI models and performance management processes among the companies. Furthermore, the analysis showed a substantial difference in perception of KPIs among investors, consultants and contractors, which consequently led to a compiling list of KPIs. The top ten KPI's are: Quality, Cost, Number of investor interferences, Changes in project support, Time increase, Client satisfaction, Employees’ satisfaction, Innovation and learning, Time and Identification of client's interest. The paper concludes with final remarks and guidelines for the implementation of KPIs in practice. Santrauka Šiuolaikineje statybos imoneje efektyvumu pagristo lyginimo svarba jau yra neišvengiama, o statybu pramonei tai reiškia nuolatinius iššūkius. Šiuo darbu siekiama išnagrineti pagrindiniu statybu sektoriaus veiklos rodikliu (PVR) reikšme, vaidmeni ir rūšis bei pademonstruoti, kaip šie rodikliai vertinami remiantis skirtingais vadybos požiūriais. Apžvelgta literatūra, siekiant sudaryti akademineje aplinkoje ir pramoneje naudojamu PVR saraša. Pasitelkus apklausas ir iš dalies struktūrinius pokalbius, buvo surinkti duomenys iš daugiau kaip 30 pietryčiu Europos statybos imoniu. Išanalizavus rezultatus gautas galutinis 37 rodikliu rinkinys. Šiame tyrime nustatyta, kad imones menkai ka težino apie PVR modelius ir efektyvumo valdymo procesus. Be to, paaiškejo, kad investuotojai, konsultantai ir rangovai PVR suvokia gana skirtingai, ir del to teko sudaryti PVR saraša. Dešimt pagrindiniu PVR yra šie: kokybe, kaina, investuotojo kišimosi atveju skaičius, pasikeitusi parama projektui, nukelti terminai, kliento pasitenkinimas, darbuotoju pasitenkinimas, naujoves ir mokymasis, laikas, kliento interesu nustatymas. Darbo pabaigoje pateikiamos baigiamosios pastabos ir PVR taikymo praktikoje rekomendacijos.
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Gharaie, Ehsan, Ron Wakefield y Nick Blismas. "Explaining the Increase in the Australian Average House Completion Time:Activity-based versus Workflow-based Approach". Construction Economics and Building 10, n.º 4 (16 de diciembre de 2010): 34–49. http://dx.doi.org/10.5130/ajceb.v10i4.1688.

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The Australian house building industry has been facing an increase in the average house completion time in the last decade. This increase in some states is quite dramatic. For instance, Western Australia has faced a 70 percent increase in the average house completion time during this period. This paper uses two planning approaches to explain this; i) the activity-based planning methods and ii) the workflow-based planning methods. In addition, this research investigates the strengths and weaknesses of these two planning approaches in explaining the behaviour of the house building industry. For this purpose, a national case study and five state case studies including Victoria, Western Australia, New South Wales, Queensland and South Australia have been used. The data related to the key parameters have been collected and their correlation with the average house completion time has been investigated. These key parameters include the average house floor area, the number of house completions and the number of houses under construction. The reasons for the increasing trend of the average house completion time have been postulated in all case studies. According to this research, the increase in the average house completion time cannot be explained using activity-based planning methods. In contrast, by using workflow-based planning methods, it has been shown that the average house completion time is correlated with the number of houses under construction. This paper shows that the average completion time is influenced directly by the workflow in the house building industry and that workflow planning should be the basis for the house building industry planning.
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Edwards, Peter y Paul Bowen. "Language and communication issues in HIV/AIDS intervention management in the South African construction industry". Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management 26, n.º 6 (15 de julio de 2019): 962–88. http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/ecam-12-2017-0260.

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Purpose Effective communication is a key factor in presenting Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) awareness and prevention campaigns, and delivering treatment programmes, particularly in South Africa where different ethnic groups and a diversity of languages and educational attainment levels are encountered. Language is an important element of such communication. The purpose of this paper is to examine the communication effectiveness of AIDS-related intervention messages. Design/methodology/approach Case-based semi-structured interviews, with 42 employees from three construction organisations, and with six telephone counsellors from a service provider, were used to explore language in the HIV/AIDS context in the construction industry in the Western Cape region. Findings Workers’ knowledge about HIV (a key element in prevention and willingness to engage in treatment regimes) tended to align with their level of education. African cultures may inhibit the use of plain language about AIDS. Graphic posters with text in different languages were the most preferred communication media, but need periodic refreshment to remain effective. For toolbox talks and other company presentations, a comprehensive approach to language differences is limited, and appropriate confirmatory feedback loops are not used – the message sent is not always the message received. The recruitment and training processes for service provider counsellors ensure a more comprehensive grasp of HIV knowledge and a more consistent approach to communication. Practical implications Construction organisations should be more careful in their HIV/AIDS campaigns and programmes, ensure better targeting of audiences and pay more nuanced and sensitive attention to language needs, gender differences and cultural contexts with respect to communicating with workers in ways that engage them more fully about HIV/AIDS, stigma and disclosure. Originality/value Communication effectiveness is pivotal in the provision of intervention management by construction firms. Ineffective language and communication processes directly and adversely influence HIV/AIDS intervention management success.

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