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Articles de revues sur le sujet "Australia Languages":

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Pauwels, Anne. « Australia as a Multilingual Nation ». Annual Review of Applied Linguistics 6 (mars 1985) : 78–99. http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s026719050000307x.

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For the benefit of readers unfamiliar with Australia's multilingual situation, the following statistics on language are provided, all derived from the 1976 Australian Census, the most recent one to provide detailed information on language use.lA wealth of languages is represented in Australia: depending on what is considered a language and what a dialect, the number of languages present in Australia is estimated at around 150 for the Aboriginal languages (100 of which are threatened by extinction) and between 75 and 100 for the immigrant languages.
2

Jorgensen, Eleanor, Jennifer Green et Anastasia Bauer. « Exploring Phonological Aspects of Australian Indigenous Sign Languages ». Languages 6, no 2 (30 avril 2021) : 81. http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/languages6020081.

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Spoken languages make up only one aspect of the communicative landscape of Indigenous Australia—sign languages are also an important part of their rich and diverse language ecologies. Australian Indigenous sign languages are predominantly used by hearing people as a replacement for speech in certain cultural contexts. Deaf or hard-of-hearing people are also known to make use of these sign languages. In some circumstances, sign may be used alongside speech, and in others it may replace speech altogether. Alternate sign languages such as those found in Australia occupy a particular place in the diversity of the world’s sign languages. However, the focus of research on sign language phonology has almost exclusively been on sign languages used in deaf communities. This paper takes steps towards deepening understandings of signed language phonology by examining the articulatory features of handshape and body locations in the signing practices of three communities in Central and Northern Australia. We demonstrate that, while Australian Indigenous sign languages have some typologically unusual features, they exhibit the same ‘fundamental’ structural characteristics as other sign languages.
3

Fullagar, Susan, et Anthony J. Liddicoat. « The role of the national languages institute of Australia in the development and implementation of language policy in Australia ». Language Planning and Language Policy in Australia 8 (1 janvier 1991) : 64–76. http://dx.doi.org/10.1075/aralss.8.04ful.

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The establishment of a languages institute has long been seen as an important step in the development of Australian language policy. After the adoption of the National Policy Languages, renewed impetus for a languages institute gave rise to the establishment of the National Languages Institute of Australia, a languages institute with a broad charter and wide-ranging functions. This paper reviews the development of the structure of the NLIA and examines the role the institute has in language policy development and implementation in three main areas: research, policy advice and service provision.
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Smolicz, J. J. « National Policy on Languages : A Community Language Perspective ». Australian Journal of Education 30, no 1 (avril 1986) : 45–65. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/000494418603000103.

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A brief historical review of language policies in Australia up to the publication of the Senate Standing Committee's Report on a National Language Policy in 1984 is given. The recommendations of the Report are discussed in the light of the ethno-cultural or core value significance that community languages have for many minority ethnic groups in Australia. Recent research findings on such languages are presented and their implications for a national language policy considered. It is postulated that the linguistic pluralism generated by the presence of community languages needs to be viewed in the context of a framework of values that includes English as the shared language for all Australians. From this perspective, it is argued that the stress that the Senate Committee Report places upon the centrality of English in Australia should be balanced by greater recognition of the linguistic rights of minorities and their implications for bilingual education. It is pointed out that both these aspects of language policy have been given prominence in recent statements and guidelines released by the Ministers of Education in Victoria and South Australia. The paper concludes by pointing to the growing interest in the teaching of languages other than English to all children in Australian schools.
5

Hamid, M. Obaidul, et Andy Kirkpatrick. « Foreign language policies in Asia and Australia in the Asian century ». Language Problems and Language Planning 40, no 1 (9 mai 2016) : 26–46. http://dx.doi.org/10.1075/lplp.40.1.02ham.

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This article provides a comparative analysis of foreign language policies in Asia and Australia with reference to policy contexts, motivations and processes. The analysis is specifically motivated by the recent publication of the Australia in the Asian Century White Paper that represents Australia’s renewed desire to engage with Asia by developing “Asia literacy” including the development of national proficiency in selected Asian languages. It is argued that, although foreign language policies in the two regions present interesting similarities in terms of policy contexts and goals, there is notable disconnect between Asia and Australia that potentially undermines Australian policy desire to connect with Asia. Furthermore, although languages, like other national resources, are planned to address social needs and aspirations, subjecting languages to economic imperative reflects not only misconceptions of languages but also misappropriation of their potential.
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Oliver, Rhonda, Honglin Chen et Stephen Moore. « Review of selected research in applied linguistics published in Australia (2008–2014) ». Language Teaching 49, no 4 (23 septembre 2016) : 513–48. http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s0261444816000148.

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This article reviews the significant and diverse range of research in applied linguistics published in Australia in the period 2008–2014. Whilst acknowledging that a great deal of research by Australian scholars has been published internationally during these seven years, this review is based on books, journal articles, and conference proceedings published in Australia. Many of these sources will be unfamiliar to an international audience, and the purpose of this article is to highlight this body of research and the themes emerging from it. The journals selected in this review includeAustralian Journal of Language and Literacy, Australian Review of Applied Linguistics (ARAL), BABEL, English in Australia, English Australia, Papers in Language Testing and Assessment, Prospect: An Australian Journal of TESOL, TESOL in Context, andUniversity of Sydney Papers in TESOL. Selected refereed proceedings are from key national conferences including: ALAA (Applied Linguistics Association of Australia), ACTA (Australian Council of TESOL Association), ASFLA (Australian Systemic Functional Linguistics Association), and ALS (Australian Linguistics Society). Our review of selected applied linguistics work revolves around the following themes: the responses to the needs of government planning and policy; the complexity of Australia's multicultural, multilingual society; the concern for recognizing context and culture as key factors in language and language learning; social activism in supporting language pedagogy and literacy programmes at all levels of education; and acknowledgement of the unique place held by Indigenous languages and Aboriginal English in the national linguistic landscape.
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Eggington, William. « Language Policy and Planning in Australia ». Annual Review of Applied Linguistics 14 (mars 1994) : 137–55. http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s0267190500002865.

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Australian federal and state government language policy and planning efforts have had a remarkable effect on Australian educational and non-educational life during the past twenty years. This effort has resulted in strong international recognition of the Australian language policy experience. For example, Romaine, in the introduction to her anthology focusing on the languages of Australia states that “the movement to set up a national language policy is so far unprecedented in the major Anglophone countries” (Romaine 1991:8).
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Lo Bianco, Joseph. « Our (not so) polyglot pollies ». Australian Review of Applied Linguistics 30, no 2 (1 janvier 2007) : 21.1–21.17. http://dx.doi.org/10.2104/aral0721.

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The present article reports on research conducted during late 2004 on the language abilities of Australia’s parliamentarians and a parliamentary debate in 2005 on languages in Australia. A small questionnaire was administered to all members of the nine legislative structures of Australia comprising six states, two territories and the one Federal parliament. This is the first such survey in Australia. While the response rate was uneven, from good to poor, the survey does shed light on the range and number of languages other than English spoken by Australia’s parliamentary representatives, where their language capabilities were gained, how proficient they estimate themselves to be, and in what settings their language skills are used. The paper includes a comparison between these Australian data and equivalent, though slightly less sketchy, data from the UK. The article concludes with the text and debate of a recent private members’ bill on languages and makes comments on the responses in light of the language abilities of the parliamentarians.
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Lo Bianco, Joseph. « Our (not so) polyglot pollies ». Australian Review of Applied Linguistics 30, no 2 (2007) : 21.1–21.17. http://dx.doi.org/10.1075/aral.30.2.04lob.

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The present article reports on research conducted during late 2004 on the language abilities of Australia’s parliamentarians and a parliamentary debate in 2005 on languages in Australia. A small questionnaire was administered to all members of the nine legislative structures of Australia comprising six states, two territories and the one Federal parliament. This is the first such survey in Australia. While the response rate was uneven, from good to poor, the survey does shed light on the range and number of languages other than English spoken by Australia’s parliamentary representatives, where their language capabilities were gained, how proficient they estimate themselves to be, and in what settings their language skills are used. The paper includes a comparison between these Australian data and equivalent, though slightly less sketchy, data from the UK. The article concludes with the text and debate of a recent private members’ bill on languages and makes comments on the responses in light of the language abilities of the parliamentarians.
10

Hill, Peter. « Teaching Slavonic languages in Australia ». Volume 3 3 (1 janvier 1986) : 123–30. http://dx.doi.org/10.1075/aralss.3.08hil.

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The absence of suitable materials for use in beginners’ courses in Macedonian for Australian undergraduates has led to the production of an Australia-based audio-visual course. The development of this course has involved decisions that fall within the area of language planning. Macedonians in Australia are not normally very conversant with the Macedonian standard or “literary” language (MSL), which is, in any case, not very highly standardized. It still shows considerable variation in lexicon and syntax. The MSL was chosen as the basis for the course, despite initial consideration being given to the idea that some form of dialectal language might be taught. The MSL Provides a neutral idiom that can serve people of different dialectal backgrounds. However, forms that are not likely to be accepted or even understood by large sections of the Macedonian communities in Australia are avoided. Colloquial, obsolescent and dialectal lexical items are included if they rate positively by this criterion.

Thèses sur le sujet "Australia Languages":

1

Robson, Stephen William. « Rethinking Mabo as a clash of constitutional languages / ». Access via Murdoch University Digital Theses Project, 2006. http://wwwlib.murdoch.edu.au/adt/browse/view/adt-MU20070207.131859.

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Rubino, Antonia. « From trilingualism to monolingualism : a case study of language shift in a Sicilian-Australian family ». University of Sydney, 1993. http://hdl.handle.net/2123/1614.

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Doctor of Philosophy
This thesis analyses language shift in a Sicilian-Australian family, from the parents' use of three languages: Sicilian, Italian and English, to the children's almost exclusive use of English.
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Kumar, Manoharan. « Genomics, Languages and the Prehistory of Aboriginal Australia ». Thesis, Griffith University, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10072/405626.

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When European settlers first arrived in Australia in 1788, Aboriginal Australians, or Traditional Owners, spoke more than 250 languages. Indigenous Australian languages are now broadly categorised into two groups: Pama-Nyungan (PN) and Non-Pama-Nyungan (NPN) languages. PN speakers traditionally inhabited more than 90% of the land mass of mainland Australia, whereas NPN speakers traditionally occupied only 10% of the land area, and this was in the far northwest of the continent. The NPN language group in particular shows very high linguistic diversity. Studies of nuclear DNA variation can provide valuable information on population polymorphism, structure, and demographics such as expansion, settlement and to date, there have been no such studies on NPN populations. Hence, population genetic studies are important to understand the genetic structure and history of NPN speaking populations. To understand the settlement of NPN language speakers in Australia and their genetic relationship with PN speakers, I undertook a comprehensive population genetic analysis of Aboriginal Australians across the continent. I obtained 56 samples with approval of Aboriginal Australian Elders from six different regions of the country, including Groote Eylandt Island (Anindilyakwa language speaker; NPN), Mornington Island (where Lardil, Kaidal and Yangkaal language speaker; NPN), northeast Arnhem Land (Yolngu language speakers; PN) and Normanton (Gkuthaarn/Kukatj language), Cairns (Gunggandjii) and Stradbroke Island (Jandai language speakers; PN). I performed whole genome sequencing with coverage (30-60X) and population genetic analysis of individuals representing three PN-speakers from three locations and four NPN-speaking populations from two locations. The 56 new genomes reported here were combined with previously published whole genome sequences of contemporary (100) and high coverage (5X) ancient (4) individuals to understand maternal and paternal ancestry, as well as nuclear genetic diversity. Mitochondrial DNA analyses revealed that Aboriginal Australians comprise four major haplogroups. These comprised N and S haplogroups that are unique to Aboriginal Australians while P, M haplogroups are shared with their neighbours from Papua and South East Asia. Phylogenetic analysis of whole mitochondrial genomic sequences showed NPN and PN speakers have shared ancestry within Australia and outside Australia, prior to European settlement. Analysis of Y-Chromosome haplogroups showed that NPN language speakers from Gulf of Carpentaria Island regions and PN speakers (Yolngu) from northeast Arnhem land have experienced very little admixture with Europeans since they arrived. However, Y-Chromosome marker from individuals belong to Stradbroke Island and Normanton showed that 90-100% of samples have European and East Asian ancestry. In addition, Y-Chromosome sequences from the Arnhem Land region showed that members of the Yolngu speaking population have a higher level of shared male ancestry with NPN speakers from Groote Eylandt and Mornington Islands than with other PN populations. Analyses of nuclear whole genome data, including PCA, ADMIXTURE & Out-group F3-statistics, revealed that NPN have distinct ancestry shared among NPNs. In addition, genetic analysis shows that PNs are the closest population to NPNs. This suggests that Australia were likely colonised by a single founder population. Furthermore, Nuclear analysis of PN speaking Arnhem Land population show that they are more closely related to NPN speakers than any other PN speakers in Australia. This is owing to the geographical proximity between these populations than their linguistic relatedness. Finally, the above 56 Aboriginal Australians samples were used to address the intriguing hypothesis, first proposed by Thomas Henry Huxley in 1870, that a close genetic relationship exists between the Indigenous peoples of Australia and India. To investigate this hypothesis, I sampled 14 genomes from South Asia and sequenced these to 30X coverage. These were compared to 160 Aboriginal Australian genomes which comprised newly sequenced (56) and previously published modern (100) together with ancient (4) samples. Population genetic analysis revealed that Aboriginal Australians do have Indian ancestry, ranging from 1-7%. However, due to the low proportion of Indian ancestry in a very few individuals I could not further confirm the potential Holocene migration from India to Australia. Future studies based on more modern and ancient Aboriginal Australian genomes could help to confirm or reject the hypothesis. The datasets presented in this thesis provide new knowledge about Aboriginal Australians including insights into their uniparental sequence ancestry, as well as genetic structure and settlement of NPN language speakers. These results will be invaluable for future research on contemporary Aboriginal Australians and will provide important implications for the identification of unprovenanced remains from regions across Australia.
Thesis (PhD Doctorate)
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)
School of Environment and Sc
Science, Environment, Engineering and Technology
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Clendon, Mark. « Topics in Worora grammar ». Title page, table of contents and abstract only, 2000. http://web4.library.adelaide.edu.au/theses/09PH/09phc627.pdf.

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Bibliography: leaves 526-532. A description of the grammar of Worora, a language from the north west Kimberley region of Western Australia, proceeds along pedagogical lines. Introducing the speakers of Worora and their history and society, and the nature of the land in which they used to live, as well as to the manner and circumstances in which this account came to be written; describing in outline six important lexical categories, essential to a basic understanding of the grammar.
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Schiavon, Sara <1994&gt. « Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Languages Education in Australia. The importance and limits of teaching Australian Indigenous languages in schools ». Master's Degree Thesis, Università Ca' Foscari Venezia, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10579/18689.

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Questa tesi tratta l’importanza e i limiti dell’educazione delle lingue Aborigene e dello Stretto di Torres nelle scuole in Australia. Le lingue Indigene in Australia hanno una storia difficile, fatta di privazioni che ne misero in pericolo la sopravvivenza. Negli scorsi decenni le lingue Aborigene sono state messe in risalto, in modo da salvarle dalla loro estinzione. Diversi programmi incoraggiano il loro insegnamento nelle scuole, tuttavia non c’è ancora una politica che lo regoli a livello nazionale. La prima parte della tesi si focalizza sulla condizione delle lingue Aborigene in Australia e sulla loro storia recente, così come sulle politiche e tattiche pedagogiche efficaci. Nella seconda parte, la ricerca si focalizza su due interviste con due insegnanti coinvolti nell’insegnamento delle lingue Aborigene, L’obiettivo è di portare alla luce l’importanza dell’introduzione delle lingue Indigene a scuola, e i limiti che le esperienze denotano. Le interviste sono state analizzate e confrontate in modo da evidenziare i diversi aspetti delle due esperienze. Entrambi gli intervistati valutano positivamente gli effetti che l’introduzione delle lingue Aborigene nelle scuole ha sugli studenti e le comunità. Tuttavia gli ostacoli non mancano e riguardano maggiormente la motivazione, la mancanza di politiche adeguate e la formazione degli insegnanti. Inoltre, entrambi concordano sulla necessità di una maggiore regolazione dell’insegnamento delle lingue Aborigene nelle scuole, cominciando dalle politiche, che faciliterebbero gli insegnanti e le comunità a creare programmi linguistici più efficaci.
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Liando, Nihta V. F. « Foreign language learning in primary schools with special reference to Indonesia, Thailand and Australia / ». Title page, contents and abstract only, 1999. http://web4.library.adelaide.edu.au/theses/09ARM/09arml693.pdf.

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Amery, Rob. « A new diglossia : contemporary speech varieties at Yirrkala in North East Arnhem land ». Thesis, Canberra, ACT : The Australian National University, 1985. http://hdl.handle.net/1885/132957.

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This subthesis is concerned with one aspect of the sociolinguistic situation at Yirrkala in N.E. Arnhem Land. In particular I shall be looking at the role and structure of a contemporary dialect of Yolngu Matha, Dhuwaya or so called "Baby Gumatj" in relation to other clan dialects. The main purpose of choosing this thesis topic is to lay some linguistic groundwork for the making of an informed decision in regard to the use of Dhuwaya within the bilingual program at Yirrkala Community School. If it is decided to employ Dhuwaya in the earlier grades (which appears to be the case), then guidelines are needed to determine which Dhuwaya forms should be employed. Adult language should be employed to serve as a model. Thus criteria are presented for choosing adult forms in preference to developmental forms. By undertaking research into Dhuwaya, I am not trying to encourage the use of Dhuwaya in any way. On the contrary, by establishing the ways in which Dhuwaya differs from clan languages and by making these differences explicit, any formal language programs undertaken in the school or in the community in the future may utilize these findings. This then would facilitate clan language acquisition by the younger generation. I use the title R New Diglossio in two senses : a) Yirrkala is a diglossic situation not previously described and is a departure from the diglossia originally defined by Ferguson (1959). b) The diglossic situation at Yirrkala appears to have been a recent development and is in fact s till in the making. In this sense it is a new diglossia chronologically. See Section 4.4 for explication. This study is by necessity a somewhat cursory overview. As a Balanda (white Australian) without having previous exposure to Top End Northern Territory communities or to Aboriginal languages of N.E. Arnhem Land3, data collection and transcription proved extremely difficult. This was especially the case because Dhuwaya is a highly stigmatized language variety at Yirrkala. This preliminary study points to the need for an in-depth longitudinal sociolinguistic study. Such a study should prove valuable in understanding issues of language maintenance within the bilingual program at Yirrkala Community School and for educational policies in the isolated homeland centres. Brief chapter summaries are as follows: CHAPTER 1 provides background material including: a) historical, b) sociological and c) linguistic, relevant to the study of Dhuwaya and its sociolinguistic context. Methodology and approach is outlined in 1.6. There are three varieties, Baby Dhuwaya, Deuelopmental Dhuwaya and Rdult Dhuwaya, all subsumed by the labels Dhuwaya or “Baby Gumatj" in common usage. These three varieties have separate identifiable phonological and morphological features. CHAPTER 2 outlines and discusses phonological features of Dhuwaya and makes comparisons between Baby Dhuwaya, Developmental Dhuwaya and Adult Dhuwaya phonology. CHAPTER 3 discusses morphological features of Adult Dhuwaya relative to a) clan dialects and b) Developmental Dhuwaya. Dhuwaya is characterized by specific morphological rules applying to dialect sensitive morphemes; rules which take into account the dialect differences between Dhuwal and Dhuwala dialects. CHAPTER 4 discusses the differences between the three varieties of Dhuwaya and the rationale for differentiating between them. Baby Dhuwaya is a restricted register demonstrating universal characteristics of Baby Talk registers whilst Developmental Dhuwaya is a maturational or child language variety illustrating features typical of developmental varieties universally. Although Developmental Dhuwaya as spoken by very young children shares many features in common with Baby Dhuwaya, there are s till important differences remaining. Adult Dhuwaya functions as a communilect or common language for the younger generation, but belongs specifically to Yirrkala and its homelands. The Yirrkala situation is quite different to other Yolngu communities in N.E. Arnhem Land (e.g. Galiwin’ku where a clan language Djambarrpuyngu has become the communilect.) At Yirrkala Dhuwaya functions as the L (Low) variety in a diglossic situation, where multilingualism is the norm. CHAPTER 5 summarizes the linguistic findings and in the light of these and other sociolinguistic evidence discusses various theories on the origin of Dhuwaya. It differs from other Yolngu Matha dialects in much the same way linguistically as these dialects differ from each other. I conclude that the most likely theory is that Dhuwaya has developed by means of koineization of Eastern Dhuwala/Dhuwal Baby Talk or ‘motherese' and developmental varieties. Dhuwaya is structurally and functionally an almost prototypical koine language variety. The implications for sociolinguistic theory, of this unique diglossic situation in North East Arnhem Land, are discussed briefly. CHAPTER 6 discusses the implications of these findings for the future in terms of a) language maintenance and b) the Yirrkala Community School bilingual education program. I conclude that the linguistic differences between Dhuwaya and other Dhuwala/Dhuwal dialects are really quite minimal. Should the community agree to the use of Dhuwaya in the earlier grades in the school, I am suggesting specific recommendations as to the variety of Dhuwaya to be employed. Adult Dhuwaya forms are better employed and I present criteria for differentiating adult forms from developmental and Baby Talk forms. Several sample texts, chosen for their exemplification of different varieties of Dhuwaya, are included in an appendix.
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Nical, Iluminado C. « Language usage and language attitudes among education consumers : the experience of Filipinos in Australia and in three linguistic communities in the Philippines ». Title page, contents and abstract only, 2000. http://web4.library.adelaide.edu.au/theses/09PH/09phn582.pdf.

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Errata inserted facing t. p. Bibliography: leaves 406-457. A comparative investigation of language usage and language attitudes in relation to Filipino/Tagalog, Philippine languages other than Tagalog and English among senior high school students and their parents in two countries, the Philippines and Australia. The study provides an historical overview of the development of national language policies in Australia and in the Philippines, focussing on the way in which multiculturalism in Australia influenced language policies, and on the reasons for the adoption of the Bilingual Education Program in the Philippines.
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Bungey, Leith Joy. « The importance of languages other than English to Western Australia ». Thesis, Bungey, Leith Joy (1996) The importance of languages other than English to Western Australia. PhD thesis, Murdoch University, 1996. https://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/51511/.

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This thesis describes the lack of official support for the teaching and learning of languages other than English (LOTE) in Western Australian schools and gauges community attitudes towards LOTE as well as the degree of appreciation of their sociological and economic importance to Western Australia. LOTE’s socio-economic significance is explained from the perspectives of enhancing communicability and maximising understanding between English background Australians and non-English speaking people, and promoting Western Australia’s tourism, trade, industry, and international relations. Primary sources of information including reports, records and media articles concerning events and government policies are examined, and survey results and interviews are analysed to discover the extent of recognition of the value of LOTE. Historical accounts provide secondary material. The study demonstrates a proportional decline in LOTE enrolments in Western Australian schools. A certain residual xenophobia accounts for some of this deterioration but the major cause is official action which militates against the learning of LOTE. Such action includes the University of Western Australia abolishing its LOTE entry prerequisite, the Education Department of Western Australia implementing the Achievement Certificate and the Unit Curriculum, state government tardiness, federal government processes and an emphasis on vocational education. The attitudes of students, parents and teachers towards LOTE were surveyed to determine the degree of community support for learning LOTE. It was found that although the community recognises the importance of LOTE to this state and partly supports their compulsory study, students are deterred from learning LOTE by the difficulties inherent in the Unit Curriculum, and by the belief that studying a LOTE detracts from a high tertiary entrance score. This research found that the government effects no real measures to promote LOTE. The thesis concludes that languages other than English are a highly desirable part of education. Government commitment by way of appropriate funding to train and employ LOTE teachers, and to alleviate administrative problems, and official promotion of the benefits of LOTE study, are necessary to integrate LOTE into the curriculum and to increase student enrolments.
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Johnson, Edward. « Karajarri sketch grammar ». Thesis, University of Sydney, 1992. http://hdl.handle.net/1885/277329.

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This thesis is a reference ( or sketch) grammar of Karajarri, an Australian Aboriginal language. As such, there is no attempt to be fully comprehensive at any point, but rather to provide a broad overview of the grammar of the language. I have chosen, however, to include in the study a more detailed analysis of one aspect of the language, namely the case-marking system (based on a framework developed by Dench and Evans 1988). This overview may be a basis for further research into particular aspects of the language. The reference grammar style of this study will also be of use in understanding the texts of Karajani which already exist from past work. The analysis is based on previous work done on Karajarri, as well as a period of field research in June 1992.

Livres sur le sujet "Australia Languages":

1

1951-, Romaine Suzanne, dir. Language in Australia. Cambridge [England] : Cambridge University Press, 1991.

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1939-, Clyne Michael G., dir. Australia, meeting place of languages. Canberra, A.C.T., Australia : Dept. of Linguistics, Research School of Pacific Studies, Australian National University, 1985.

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Mushin, Ilana. A grammar of (Western) Garrwa. Boston, [MA] : De Gruyter Mouton, 2012.

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Kendon, Adam. Sign languagesof aboriginal Australia : Cultural, semiotic and communicative perspectives. Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 1988.

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Kendon, Adam. Sign languages of Aboriginal Australia : Cultural, semiotic, and communicative perspectives. Cambridge [Cambridgeshire] : Cambridge University Press, 1988.

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McGregor, William. The Nyulnyul language of Dampier Land, Western Australia. Canberra, A.C.T : Pacific Linguistics, 2012.

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Clyne, Michael G. Community languages : The Australian experience. Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 1991.

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Terrill, Angela. Dharumbal : The language of Rockhampton, Australia. Canberra : Pacific Linguistics, Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies, Australian National University, 2002.

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McGregor, William, et William McGregor. The languages of the Kimberley, Western Australia. New York : RoutledgeCurzon, 2004.

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Jonsen, Helen. Hippocrene language and travel guide to Australia. New York : Hippocrene Books, 1994.

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Chapitres de livres sur le sujet "Australia Languages":

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Kipp, Sandra. « Community languages in Australia ». Dans Mapping Linguistic Diversity in Multicultural Contexts, 293–310. Berlin, New York : Mouton de Gruyter, 2008. http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/9783110207347.4.293.

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Laugesen, Amanda, et Catherine Fisher. « Conclusion : Languages of War ». Dans Expressions of War in Australia and the Pacific, 229–34. Cham : Springer International Publishing, 2019. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-23890-2_11.

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Ndhlovu, Finex. « Belonging and Attitudes Towards Migrant Heritage Languages ». Dans Becoming an African Diaspora in Australia, 86–100. London : Palgrave Macmillan UK, 2014. http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/9781137414328_4.

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Harris, Stephen, et Brian Devlin. « Bilingual Programs Involving Aboriginal Languages in Australia ». Dans Bilingual Education, 1–14. Dordrecht : Springer Netherlands, 1997. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-94-011-4531-2_1.

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Evans, Nicholas. « 8. Experiencer objects in Iwaidjan languages (Australia) ». Dans Typological Studies in Language, 169. Amsterdam : John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2004. http://dx.doi.org/10.1075/tsl.60.10eva.

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Disbray, Samantha, et Gillian Wigglesworth. « Indigenous Children’s Language Practices in Australia ». Dans The Palgrave Handbook of Minority Languages and Communities, 357–81. London : Palgrave Macmillan UK, 2018. http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-54066-9_14.

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Meakins, Felicity. « Australia and the South West Pacific ». Dans The Routledge Handbook of Pidgin and Creole Languages, 88–105. Other titles : Handbook of Pidgin and Creole languages Description : New York : Routledge, 2020. | Series : Routledge handbooks in linguistics : Routledge, 2020. http://dx.doi.org/10.4324/9781003107224-7.

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Ndhlovu, Finex, et Louisa Willoughby. « Migration, Heritage Languages, and Changing Demographics in Australia ». Dans The Routledge Handbook of Heritage Language Education, 22–32. New York, NY ; Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon : Routledge, [2017] | Series : Routledge Handbooks in Linguistics : Routledge, 2017. http://dx.doi.org/10.4324/9781315727974-3.

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Lo Bianco, Joseph. « Contrasting and Comparing Minority Language Policy : Europe and Australia ». Dans Maintaining Minority Languages in Transnational Contexts, 78–104. London : Palgrave Macmillan UK, 2007. http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/9780230206397_5.

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Pym, Anthony, Bei Hu, Maria Karidakis, John Hajek, Robyn Woodward-Kron et Riccardo Amorati. « Community Trust in Translations of Official COVID-19 Communications in Australia ». Dans The Languages of COVID-19, 110–27. New York : Routledge, 2022. http://dx.doi.org/10.4324/9781003267843-10.

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Actes de conférences sur le sujet "Australia Languages":

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Omar, Asmah Haji. « The Malay Language in Mainland Southeast Asia ». Dans GLOCAL Conference on Asian Linguistic Anthropology 2019. The GLOCAL Unit, SOAS University of London, 2019. http://dx.doi.org/10.47298/cala2019.16-1.

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Today the Malay language is known to have communities of speakers outside the Malay archipelago, such as in Australia inclusive of the Christmas Islands and the Cocos (Keeling) Islands in the Indian Ocean (Asmah, 2008), the Holy Land of Mecca and Medina (Asmah et al. 2015), England, the Netherlands, France, and Germany. The Malay language is also known to have its presence on the Asian mainland, i.e. Thailand, Cambodia, and Vietnam. As Malays in these three countries belong to a minority, in fact among the smallest of the minorities, questions that arise are those that pertain to: (i) their history of settlement in the localities where they are now; (ii) the position of Malay in the context of the language policy of their country; and (iii) maintenance and shift of the ancestral and adopted languages.
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Johnstone, Penelope. « Accommodating Diversity of the 21st CenturyLanguage learner in primary Languages Education inNew South Wales, Australia. » Dans 6th Annual International Conference on Language, Literature and Linguistics (L3 2017). Global Science & Technology Forum (GSTF), 2017. http://dx.doi.org/10.5176/2251-3566_l317.138.

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Shariati, Saeed, Jocelyn Armarego et Fay Sudweeks. « The Impact of e-Skills on the Settlement of Iranian Refugees in Australia ». Dans InSITE 2017 : Informing Science + IT Education Conferences : Vietnam. Informing Science Institute, 2017. http://dx.doi.org/10.28945/3684.

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[This Proceedings paper was revised and published in the Interdisciplinary Journal of E-Skills and Lifelong Learning (IJELL)] Aim/Purpose: The research investigates the impact of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) on Iranian refugees’ settlement in Australia. Background: The study identifies the issues of settlement, such as language, cultural and social differences. Methodology: The Multi-Sited Ethnography (MSE), which is a qualitative methodology, has been used with a thematic analysis drawing on a series of semi-structured interviews with two groups of participants (51 Iranian refugees and 55 people with a role in assisting refugees). Contribution: The research findings may enable the creation of a model for use by the Australian Government with Iranian refugees. Findings: The findings show the vital role ICT play in refugees’ ongoing day-to-day life towards settlement. Recommendations for Practitioners: The results from this paper could be generalised to other groups of refugees in Australia and also could be used for Iranian refugees in other countries. Recommendation for Researchers: Researchers may use a similar study for refugees of different backgrounds in Australia and around the world. Impact on Society: ICT may assist refugees to become less isolated, less marginalized and part of mainstream society. Future Research: Future research could look into the digital divide between refugees in Australia and main stream Australians.
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Jordan, Colin Lyle, Roozbeh Koochak, Martin Roberts, Ajay Nalonnil et Mike Honeychurch. « A Holistic Approach to Big Data and Data Analytics for Automated Reservoir Surveillance and Analysis ». Dans SPE Asia Pacific Oil & Gas Conference and Exhibition. SPE, 2022. http://dx.doi.org/10.2118/210757-ms.

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Abstract Analyses have been widely applied in production forecasting of oil/gas production in both conventional and unconventional reservoirs. In order to forecast production, traditional regression and machine learning approaches have been applied to various reservoir analysis methods. Nevertheless, these methods are still suboptimal in detecting similar production trends in different wells due to data artifacts (noise, data scatter, outliers) that obscure the reservoir signal and leading to large forecast error, or fail due to lack of data access (inadequate SCADA systems, missing or abhorrent data, and much more). Furthermore, without proper and complete integration into a data system, discipline silos still exist reducing the efficiency of automation. This paper describes a recent field trial conducted in Australia's Cooper Basin with the objective to develop a completely automated end-to-end system in which data are captured directly from the field/SCADA system, automatically imported/processed, and finally analyzed entirely in automated system using modern computing languages, modern devices incl. IoT, as well as advanced data science and machine learning methods. This was a multidisciplinary undertaking requiring expertise from petroleum, computing/programming, and data science disciplines. The back-end layer was developed using Wolfram's computation engine, run from an independent server in Australia, while the front-end graphical user interface (GUI) was developed using a combination of Wolfram Language, Java, and JavaScript – all later switched to a Python-React combination after extensive testing. The system was designed to simultaneously capture data real-time from SCADA Historians, IIoT devices, and remote databases for automatic processing and analysis through API's. Automatic processing included "Smart Filtering" using apparent Productivity Index and similar methods. Automated analysis, including scenario analysis, was performed using customized M/L and statistical methods which are then applied to Decline curve analysis (DCA), flowing material balance analysis (FMB), and Water-Oil-Ratio (WOR). The entire procedure is automated, without need for any human intervention.
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Alan Hodgett, Richard. « The Acceptance of Object-Oriented Development Methodologies in Australian Organizations and the Place of UML in Information Systems Programs ». Dans 2003 Informing Science + IT Education Conference. Informing Science Institute, 2003. http://dx.doi.org/10.28945/2600.

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It is claimed that the Unified Modeling Language (UML) is emerging as the accepted standard graphical language for specifying, constructing, visualizing and documenting the object oriented information systems development process. As such it has gained a place in many information systems programs. An investigation of Australian organizations indicates that the use of object oriented development methodologies and UML is gradually increasing in Australia but is still to see general acceptance. This raises the question of the priority that should be accorded to the inclusion of UML in competition with other topics and issues in information systems education programs.
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Fatima Hajizada, Fatima Hajizada. « SPECIFIC FEATURES OF THE AMERICAN VERSION OF THE BRITISH LANGUAGE ». Dans THE FIRST INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC – PRACTICAL VIRTUAL CONFERENCE IN MODERN & SOCIAL SCIENCES : NEW DIMENSIONS, APPROACHES AND CHALLENGES. IRETC, 2022. http://dx.doi.org/10.36962/mssndac-01-10.

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English is one of the most spoken languages in the world. A global language communication is inherent in him. This language is also distinguished by a significant diversity of dialects and speech. It appeared in the early Middle Ages as the spoken language of the Anglo-Saxons. The formation of the British Empire and its expansion led to the widespread English language in Asia, Africa, North America and Australia. As a result, the Metropolitan language became the main communication language in the English colonies, and after independence it became State (USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand) and official (India, Nigeria, Singapore). Being one of the 6 Official Languages of the UN, it is studied as a foreign language in educational institutions of many countries in the modern time [1, 2, s. 12-14]. Despite the dozens of varieties of English, the American (American English) version, which appeared on the territory of the United States, is one of the most widespread. More than 80 per cent of the population in this country knows the American version of the British language as its native language. Although the American version of the British language is not defined as the official language in the US Federal Constitution, it acts with features and standards reinforced in the lexical sphere, the media and the education system. The growing political and economic power of the United States after World War II also had a significant impact on the expansion of the American version of the British language [3]. Currently, this language version has become one of the main topics of scientific research in the field of linguistics, philology and other similar spheres. It should also be emphasized that the American version of the British language paved the way for the creation of thousands of words and expressions, took its place in the general language of English and the world lexicon. “Okay”, “teenager”, “hitchhike”, “landslide” and other words can be shown in this row. The impact of differences in the life and life of colonists in the United States and Great Britain on this language was not significant either. The role of Nature, Climate, Environment and lifestyle should also be appreciated here. There is no officially confirmed language accent in the United States. However, most speakers of national media and, first of all, the CNN channel use the dialect “general American accent”. Here, the main accent of “mid Pppemestern” has been guided. It should also be noted that this accent is inherent in a very small part of the U.S. population, especially in Nebraska, Iowa, and Illinois. But now all Americans easily understand and speak about it. As for the current state of the American version of the British language, we can say that there are some hypotheses in this area. A number of researchers perceive it as an independent language, others-as an English variant. The founder of American spelling, American and British lexicographer, linguist Noah Pondebster treats him as an independent language. He also tried to justify this in his work “the American Dictionary of English” written in 1828 [4]. This position was expressed by a Scottish-born English philologist, one of the authors of the “American English Dictionary”Sir Alexander Craigie, American linguist Raven ioor McDavid Jr. and others also confirm [5]. The second is the American linguist Leonard Bloomfield, one of the creators of the descriptive direction of structural linguistics, and other American linguists Edward Sapir and Charles Francis Hockett. There is also another group of “third parties” that accept American English as a regional dialect [5, 6]. A number of researchers [2] have shown that the accent or dialect in the US on the person contains significantly less data in itself than in the UK. In Great Britain, a dialect speaker is viewed as a person with a low social environment or a low education. It is difficult to perceive this reality in the US environment. That is, a person's speech in the American version of the British language makes it difficult to express his social background. On the other hand, the American version of the British language is distinguished by its faster pace [7, 8]. One of the main characteristic features of the American language array is associated with the emphasis on a number of letters and, in particular, the pronunciation of the letter “R”. Thus, in British English words like “port”, “more”, “dinner” the letter “R” is not pronounced at all. Another trend is related to the clear pronunciation of individual syllables in American English. Unlike them, the Britons “absorb”such syllables in a number of similar words [8]. Despite all these differences, an analysis of facts and theoretical knowledge shows that the emergence and formation of the American version of the British language was not an accidental and chaotic process. The reality is that the life of the colonialists had a huge impact on American English. These processes were further deepened by the growing migration trends at the later historical stage. Thus, the language of the English-speaking migrants in America has been developed due to historical conditions, adapted to the existing living environment and new life realities. On the other hand, the formation of this independent language was also reflected in the purposeful policy of the newly formed US state. Thus, the original British words were modified and acquired a fundamentally new meaning. Another point here was that the British acharism, which had long been out of use, gained a new breath and actively entered the speech circulation in the United States. Thus, the analysis shows that the American version of the British language has specific features. It was formed and developed as a result of colonization and expansion. This development is still ongoing and is one of the languages of millions of US states and people, as well as audiences of millions of people. Keywords: American English, English, linguistics, accent.
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Chun Wai, Wilson Yeung, et Estefanía Salas Llopis. « THE SPACE BETWEEN US ». Dans INNODOCT 2020. Valencia : Editorial Universitat Politècnica de València, 2020. http://dx.doi.org/10.4995/inn2020.2020.11901.

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This article explores how to integrate the collective creation of contemporary art exhibitions, and how to transform exhibition works into contemporary language and novel visual art materials, thereby generating cultural exchange between Australia and Spain. The Space Between Us (2017- ), co-curated by Australian artist-curator Wilson Yeung and Spanish artist Estefanía Salas Llopis, resolve these questions by examining the contemporary art exhibition. This paper also asks how to transform art exhibitions into laboratories, how artists and curators work together in a collective innovation environment, how collective creation generates new knowledge, and how to develop collective creation among creative participants from different cultures and backgrounds.
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De Raadt, Michael, Richard Watson et Mark Toleman. « Language Trends in Introductory Programming Courses ». Dans 2002 Informing Science + IT Education Conference. Informing Science Institute, 2002. http://dx.doi.org/10.28945/2464.

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Deciding what to teach novice programmers about programming and, in particular, which programming language to teach to novice programmers, and how to teach it, is a common topic for debate within universities. Should an industry relevant programming language be taught, or should a language designed for teaching novices be used? In order to design tools and methodologies for the teaching of novice programmers it is important to uncover what is being taught, and in turn, what will be taught in the future. A census of introductory programming courses administered within all Australian universities has been undertaken. The census aimed to reveal not only what computer programming languages are being taught, but also how they are being taught. From the results of this census two key factors emerged: perceived industry pressure for graduates with certain language skills versus academic training for generic programming skills.
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Li, Qiuyu. « Australia Media Studies ». Dans 2021 International Conference on Education, Language and Art (ICELA 2021). Paris, France : Atlantis Press, 2022. http://dx.doi.org/10.2991/assehr.k.220131.058.

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Tabain, Marija, Andrew Butcher, Gavan Breen et Richard Beare. « Lateral formants in three central australian languages ». Dans Interspeech 2014. ISCA : ISCA, 2014. http://dx.doi.org/10.21437/interspeech.2014-240.

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Rapports d'organisations sur le sujet "Australia Languages":

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Piller, Ingrid. Australia’s language challenges limit national potential. Sous la direction de Reece Hooker. Monash University, août 2022. http://dx.doi.org/10.54377/09e0-b6c3.

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Gattenhof, Sandra, Donna Hancox, Sasha Mackay, Kathryn Kelly, Te Oti Rakena et Gabriela Baron. Valuing the Arts in Australia and Aotearoa New Zealand. Queensland University of Technology, décembre 2022. http://dx.doi.org/10.5204/rep.eprints.227800.

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The arts do not exist in vacuum and cannot be valued in abstract ways; their value is how they make people feel, what they can empower people to do and how they interact with place to create legacy. This research presents insights across Australia and Aotearoa New Zealand about the value of arts and culture that may be factored into whole of government decision making to enable creative, vibrant, liveable and inclusive communities and nations. The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed a great deal about our societies, our collective wellbeing, and how urgent the choices we make now are for our futures. There has been a great deal of discussion – formally and informally – about the value of the arts in our lives at this time. Rightly, it has been pointed out that during this profound disruption entertainment has been a lifeline for many, and this argument serves to re-enforce what the public (and governments) already know about audience behaviours and the economic value of the arts and entertainment sectors. Wesley Enoch stated in The Saturday Paper, “[m]etrics for success are already skewing from qualitative to quantitative. In coming years, this will continue unabated, with impact measured by numbers of eyeballs engaged in transitory exposure or mass distraction rather than deep connection, community development and risk” (2020, 7). This disconnect between the impact of arts and culture on individuals and communities, and what is measured, will continue without leadership from the sector that involves more diverse voices and perspectives. In undertaking this research for Australia Council for the Arts and Manatū Taonga Ministry for Culture & Heritage, New Zealand, the agreed aims of this research are expressed as: 1. Significantly advance the understanding and approaches to design, development and implementation of assessment frameworks to gauge the value and impact of arts engagement with a focus on redefining evaluative practices to determine wellbeing, public value and social inclusion resulting from arts engagement in Australia and Aotearoa New Zealand. 2. Develop comprehensive, contemporary, rigorous new language frameworks to account for a multiplicity of understandings related to the value and impact of arts and culture across diverse communities. 3. Conduct sector analysis around understandings of markers of impact and value of arts engagement to identify success factors for broad government, policy, professional practitioner and community engagement. This research develops innovative conceptual understandings that can be used to assess the value and impact of arts and cultural engagement. The discussion shows how interaction with arts and culture creates, supports and extends factors such as public value, wellbeing, and social inclusion. The intersection of previously published research, and interviews with key informants including artists, peak arts organisations, gallery or museum staff, community cultural development organisations, funders and researchers, illuminates the differing perceptions about public value. The report proffers opportunities to develop a new discourse about what the arts contribute, how the contribution can be described, and what opportunities exist to assist the arts sector to communicate outcomes of arts engagement in Australia and Aotearoa New Zealand.
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Cassity, Elizabeth, Jacqueline Cheng et Debbie Wong. Teacher development multi-year study series. Vanuatu : Interim report 1. Australian Council for Educational Research, 2021. http://dx.doi.org/10.37517/978-1-74286-672-7.

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The Government of Vanuatu is undertaking significant primary education reforms, including major curriculum changes, to improve equitable access to and the quality of education. Since 2016, a new primary education curriculum has been introduced by stages, accompanied by a suite of in-service teacher training. The new curriculum promotes teaching practices that support new pedagogies focused on student-centred learning and community support, language transition and class-based assessment practices. These reforms are being supported by the Australian Government, through its Vanuatu Education Support Program (VESP). The Australian Government's Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) has commissioned a study to investigate how the VESP is making a difference to the Government of Vanuatu’s ongoing primary education reforms. This research is part of a multi-year study series undertaken by DFAT's Education Analytics Service to investigate teacher and learning development initiatives in three countries: Lao PDR, Timor-Leste and Vanuatu. The purpose of this summary is to provide a brief overview of findings and recommendations from the first year (2019) of the Vanuatu study.
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Hollingsworth, Hilary, Debbie Wong, Elizabeth Cassity, Prue Anderson et Jessica Thompson. Teacher Development Multi-Year Study Series. Evaluation of Australia’s investment in teacher development in Lao PDR : Interim report 1. Australian Council for Educational Research, 2022. http://dx.doi.org/10.37517/978-1-74286-674-1.

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The Government of Lao People’s Democratic Republic (Lao PDR) is undertaking significant primary education reforms, supported by the Australian Government's Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) through its flagship Basic Education Quality and Access in Laos program (BEQUAL). The Australian Government has commissioned a study to investigate how the BEQUAL program is making a difference to improving teaching quality and student learning outcomes. This research is part of a multi-year study series undertaken by DFAT's Education Analytics Service to investigate teacher and learning development initiatives in three countries: Lao PDR, Timor-Leste and Vanuatu. In 2019, the new curriculum for Lao language and other subjects was introduced for Grade 1 and is being phased in across all five primary grades. The new curriculum promotes teaching practices that support pedagogies focused on student-centred approaches, active learning, assessment of student learning progress, and a phonics approach to teaching reading. Teachers are being provided with teacher guides and other teaching and learning resources, and receive face-to-face orientation on the new curriculum. In BEQUAL-targeted districts, education support grants are also available to facilitate additional in-service support for teachers and principals. This study has provided the opportunity to investigate teaching quality and student literacy outcomes in Lao PDR over two rounds of data collection, with another planned for October 2022. The Baseline Report captured ‘state of play’ information in 2019 prior to major curriculum changes, as well as the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. This summary provides an overview of findings and recommendations from the second year (2021) of the study, following two years of BEQUAL support for the implementation of the new Grade 1 Lao language curriculum.
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McEntee, Alice, Sonia Hines, Joshua Trigg, Kate Fairweather, Ashleigh Guillaumier, Jane Fischer, Billie Bonevski, James A. Smith, Carlene Wilson et Jacqueline Bowden. Tobacco cessation in CALD communities. The Sax Institute, juin 2022. http://dx.doi.org/10.57022/sneg4189.

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Background Australia is a multi-cultural society with increasing rates of people from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds. On average, CALD groups have higher rates of tobacco use, lower participation in cancer screening programs, and poorer health outcomes than the general Australian population. Lower cancer screening and smoking cessation rates are due to differing cultural norms, health-related attitudes, and beliefs, and language barriers. Interventions can help address these potential barriers and increase tobacco cessation and cancer screening rates among CALD groups. Cancer Council NSW (CCNSW) aims to reduce the impact of cancer and improve cancer outcomes for priority populations including CALD communities. In line with this objective, CCNSW commissioned this rapid review of interventions implemented in Australia and comparable countries. Review questions This review aimed to address the following specific questions: Question 1 (Q1): What smoking cessation interventions have been proven effective in reducing or preventing smoking among culturally and linguistically diverse communities? Question 2 (Q2): What screening interventions have proven effective in increasing participation in population cancer screening programs among culturally and linguistically diverse populations? This review focused on Chinese-, Vietnamese- and Arabic-speaking people as they are the largest CALD groups in Australia and have high rates of tobacco use and poor screening adherence in NSW. Summary of methods An extensive search of peer-reviewed and grey literature published between January 2013-March 2022 identified 19 eligible studies for inclusion in the Q1 review and 49 studies for the Q2 review. The National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Levels of Evidence and Joanna Briggs Institute’s (JBI) Critical Appraisal Tools were used to assess the robustness and quality of the included studies, respectively. Key findings Findings are reported by components of an intervention overall and for each CALD group. By understanding the effectiveness of individual components, results will demonstrate key building blocks of an effective intervention. Question 1: What smoking cessation interventions have been proven effective in reducing or preventing smoking among culturally and linguistically diverse communities? Thirteen of the 19 studies were Level IV (L4) evidence, four were Level III (L3), one was Level II (L2), none were L1 (highest level of evidence) and one study’s evidence level was unable to be determined. The quality of included studies varied. Fifteen tobacco cessation intervention components were included, with most interventions involving at least three components (range 2-6). Written information (14 studies), and education sessions (10 studies) were the most common components included in an intervention. Eight of the 15 intervention components explored had promising evidence for use with Chinese-speaking participants (written information, education sessions, visual information, counselling, involving a family member or friend, nicotine replacement therapy, branded merchandise, and mobile messaging). Another two components (media campaign and telephone follow-up) had evidence aggregated across CALD groups (i.e., results for Chinese-speaking participants were combined with other CALD group(s)). No intervention component was deemed of sufficient evidence for use with Vietnamese-speaking participants and four intervention components had aggregated evidence (written information, education sessions, counselling, nicotine replacement therapy). Counselling was the only intervention component to have promising evidence for use with Arabic-speaking participants and one had mixed evidence (written information). Question 2: What screening interventions have proven effective in increasing participation in population cancer screening programs among culturally and linguistically diverse populations? Two of the 49 studies were Level I (L1) evidence, 13 L2, seven L3, 25 L4 and two studies’ level of evidence was unable to be determined. Eighteen intervention components were assessed with most interventions involving 3-4 components (range 1-6). Education sessions (32 studies), written information (23 studies) and patient navigation (10 studies) were the most common components. Seven of the 18 cancer screening intervention components had promising evidence to support their use with Vietnamese-speaking participants (education sessions, written information, patient navigation, visual information, peer/community health worker, counselling, and peer experience). The component, opportunity to be screened (e.g. mailed or handed a bowel screening test), had aggregated evidence regarding its use with Vietnamese-speaking participants. Seven intervention components (education session, written information, visual information, peer/community health worker, opportunity to be screened, counselling, and branded merchandise) also had promising evidence to support their use with Chinese-speaking participants whilst two components had mixed (patient navigation) or aggregated (media campaign) evidence. One intervention component for use with Arabic-speaking participants had promising evidence to support its use (opportunity to be screened) and eight intervention components had mixed or aggregated support (education sessions, written information, patient navigation, visual information, peer/community health worker, peer experience, media campaign, and anatomical models). Gaps in the evidence There were four noteworthy gaps in the evidence: 1. No systematic review was captured for Q1, and only two studies were randomised controlled trials. Much of the evidence is therefore based on lower level study designs, with risk of bias. 2. Many studies provided inadequate detail regarding their intervention design which impacts both the quality appraisal and how mixed finding results can be interpreted. 3. Several intervention components were found to have supportive evidence available only at the aggregate level. Further research is warranted to determine the interventions effectiveness with the individual CALD participant group only. 4. The evidence regarding the effectiveness of certain intervention components were either unknown (no studies) or insufficient (only one study) across CALD groups. This was the predominately the case for Arabic-speaking participants for both Q1 and Q2, and for Vietnamese-speaking participants for Q1. Further research is therefore warranted. Applicability Most of the intervention components included in this review are applicable for use in the Australian context, and NSW specifically. However, intervention components assessed as having insufficient, mixed, or no evidence require further research. Cancer screening and tobacco cessation interventions targeting Chinese-speaking participants were more common and therefore showed more evidence of effectiveness for the intervention components explored. There was support for cancer screening intervention components targeting Vietnamese-speaking participants but not for tobacco cessation interventions. There were few interventions implemented for Arabic-speaking participants that addressed tobacco cessation and screening adherence. Much of the evidence for Vietnamese and Arabic-speaking participants was further limited by studies co-recruiting multiple CALD groups and reporting aggregate results. Conclusion There is sound evidence for use of a range of intervention components to address tobacco cessation and cancer screening adherence among Chinese-speaking populations, and cancer screening adherence among Vietnamese-speaking populations. Evidence is lacking regarding the effectiveness of tobacco cessation interventions with Vietnamese- and Arabic-speaking participants, and cancer screening interventions for Arabic-speaking participants. More research is required to determine whether components considered effective for use in one CALD group are applicable to other CALD populations.
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Ossoff, Will, Naz Modirzadeh et Dustin Lewis. Preparing for a Twenty-Four-Month Sprint : A Primer for Prospective and New Elected Members of the United Nations Security Council. Harvard Law School Program on International Law and Armed Conflict, décembre 2020. http://dx.doi.org/10.54813/tzle1195.

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Under the United Nations Charter, the U.N. Security Council has several important functions and powers, not least with regard to taking binding actions to maintain international peace and security. The ten elected members have the opportunity to influence this area and others during their two-year terms on the Council. In this paper, we aim to illustrate some of these opportunities, identify potential guidance from prior elected members’ experiences, and outline the key procedures that incoming elected members should be aware of as they prepare to join the Council. In doing so, we seek in part to summarize the current state of scholarship and policy analysis in an effort to make this material more accessible to States and, particularly, to States’ legal advisers. We drafted this paper with a view towards States that have been elected and are preparing to join the Council, as well as for those States that are considering bidding for a seat on the Council. As a starting point, it may be warranted to dedicate resources for personnel at home in the capital and at the Mission in New York to become deeply familiar with the language, structure, and content of the relevant provisions of the U.N. Charter. That is because it is through those provisions that Council members engage in the diverse forms of political contestation and cooperation at the center of the Council’s work. In both the Charter itself and the Council’s practices and procedures, there are structural impediments that may hinder the influence of elected members on the Security Council. These include the permanent members’ veto power over decisions on matters not characterized as procedural and the short preparation time for newly elected members. Nevertheless, elected members have found creative ways to have an impact. Many of the Council’s “procedures” — such as the “penholder” system for drafting resolutions — are informal practices that can be navigated by resourceful and well-prepared elected members. Mechanisms through which elected members can exert influence include the following: Drafting resolutions; Drafting Presidential Statements, which might serve as a prelude to future resolutions; Drafting Notes by the President, which can be used, among other things, to change Council working methods; Chairing subsidiary bodies, such as sanctions committees; Chairing the Presidency; Introducing new substantive topics onto the Council’s agenda; and Undertaking “Arria-formula” meetings, which allow for broader participation from outside the Council. Case studies help illustrate the types and degrees of impact that elected members can have through their own initiative. Examples include the following undertakings: Canada’s emphasis in 1999–2000 on civilian protection, which led to numerous resolutions and the establishment of civilian protection as a topic on which the Council remains “seized” and continues to have regular debates; Belgium’s effort in 2007 to clarify the Council’s strategy around addressing natural resources and armed conflict, which resulted in a Presidential Statement; Australia’s efforts in 2014 resulting in the placing of the North Korean human rights situation on the Council’s agenda for the first time; and Brazil’s “Responsibility while Protecting” 2011 concept note, which helped shape debate around the Responsibility to Protect concept. Elected members have also influenced Council processes by working together in diverse coalitions. Examples include the following instances: Egypt, Japan, New Zealand, Spain, and Uruguay drafted a resolution that was adopted in 2016 on the protection of health-care workers in armed conflict; Cote d’Ivoire, Kuwait, the Netherlands, and Sweden drafted a resolution that was adopted in 2018 condemning the use of famine as an instrument of warfare; Malaysia, New Zealand, Senegal, and Venezuela tabled a 2016 resolution, which was ultimately adopted, condemning Israeli settlements in Palestinian territory; and A group of successive elected members helped reform the process around the imposition of sanctions against al-Qaeda and associated entities (later including the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant), including by establishing an Ombudsperson. Past elected members’ experiences may offer some specific pieces of guidance for new members preparing to take their seats on the Council. For example, prospective, new, and current members might seek to take the following measures: Increase the size of and support for the staff of the Mission to the U.N., both in New York and in home capitals; Deploy high-level officials to help gain support for initiatives; Partner with members of the P5 who are the informal “penholder” on certain topics, as this may offer more opportunities to draft resolutions; Build support for initiatives from U.N. Member States that do not currently sit on the Council; and Leave enough time to see initiatives through to completion and continue to follow up after leaving the Council.
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Children with low language ability are at risk of a poor health-related quality-of-life. ACAMH, octobre 2020. http://dx.doi.org/10.13056/acamh.13631.

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Ha Le and colleagues have examined the association between low language ability and health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) in an Australian community-based cohort of 1,910 children assessed throughout childhood.
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Mapping the Public Voice for Development—Natural Language Processing of Social Media Text Data : A Special Supplement of Key Indicators for Asia and the Pacific 2022. Asian Development Bank, août 2022. http://dx.doi.org/10.22617/fls220347-3.

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This publication explores how natural language processing (NLP) techniques can be applied to social media text data to map public sentiment and inform development research and policy making. The publication introduces the foundations of natural language analyses and showcases studies that have applied NLP techniques to make progress on the Sustainable Development Goals. It also reviews specific NLP techniques and concepts, supported by two case studies. The first case study analyzes public sentiments on the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in the Philippines while the second case study explores the public debate on climate change in Australia.

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