Academic literature on the topic 'Greek poetry'

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Journal articles on the topic "Greek poetry"

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Ghosh, Ritwik. "Contemporary Greek Poetry as World Literature." International Journal of English and Comparative Literary Studies 2, no. 3 (April 22, 2021): 71–78. http://dx.doi.org/10.47631/ijecls.v2i3.247.

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In this paper, I argue that Greek poetry is a living tradition characterized by a diversity of voices and styles and that Greek poetry is a vital part of contemporary World Literature. The diversity of voices in contemporary Greek poetry gives it both aesthetic value and political relevance. Greek poetry, as it survives translation into a number of languages, including English, gives us a model for the successful translation of texts in both World literature and Comparative literature. A thematic analysis of some poems is presented in this paper. The aim is not to chronicle the contemporary Greek poetic production but to show how Greek poetic tradition continues to expand beyond national boundaries.
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WILLETT, STEVEN J. "Anthologizing Greek Poetry." Arion: A Journal of the Humanities and the Classics 18, no. 3 (2010): 163–79. http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/arn.2010.0044.

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Knox, Bernard, Albin Lesky, and Matthew Dillon. "Greek Tragic Poetry." Classical World 78, no. 3 (1985): 229. http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/4349745.

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West, M. L. "EARLY GREEK POETRY." Classical Review 50, no. 2 (October 2000): 402–3. http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cr/50.2.402.

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Heath, Malcolm. "Greek Literature." Greece and Rome 69, no. 1 (March 7, 2022): 135–39. http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s0017383521000280.

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The influence of Greek poetry on Latin poetry is well known. Why, then, is the reciprocal influence of Latin poetry on Greek not so readily discernible? What does that reveal about Greek–Latin bilingualism and biculturalism? Perhaps not very much. The evidence that Daniel Jolowicz surveys in the densely written 34-page introduction to his 400-page Latin Poetry in the Ancient Greek Novel amply testifies to Greek engagement with Latin language and culture on a larger scale than is usually recognized. That this engagement is more readily discernible in Greek novels than in Greek poetry is no reason to dismiss the evidence that the novels provide. On the contrary, the seven main chapters provide ‘readings of the Greek novels that establish Latin poetry…as an essential frame of reference’ (2). In Chapters 1–3 Chariton engages with the love elegy of Propertius, Ovid and Tibullus, with Ovid's epistolary poetry and the poetry of exile, and with the Aeneid. In Chapters 4–5 Achilles Tatius engages with Latin elegy and (again) the Aeneid, and also with the ‘destruction of bodies’ (221) in Ovid, Lucan, and Seneca. In Chapter 7 Longus engages with Virgil's Eclogues and the Aeneid. The strength of the evidence requires only a brief conclusion. Jolowicz's rigorously argued and methodologically convincing monograph deserves to be read widely, and with close attention.
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Andrade, Tadeu. "Insularity and the Unique Position of Aeolic Song in Archaic Greek Poetry." Mare Nostrum 12, no. 2 (August 4, 2021): 79–114. http://dx.doi.org/10.11606/issn.2177-4218.v12i2p79-114.

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Archaic Greek poetry was a multiple phenomenon: different areas developed diverse, though interrelated genres. This article comments on the unique position Aeolic mélos had in the archaic Greek song tradition. Firstly, it points to Sappho and Alcaeus’ somewhat ambivalent reception by ancient authors. Secondly, it shows how different aspects of their corpus exhibit a pattern of communication with other Greek poetry, while maintaining its own particularities. This unique status is demonstrated by an analysis of Aeolic poetic formulae. Finally, the article proposes the insular geography of Lesbos as one of the reasons for the singularity of this poetry.
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Giangrande, Giuseppe. "Written Composition and Early Greek Lyric Poetry." Emerita 82, no. 1 (June 2, 2014): 149–51. http://dx.doi.org/10.3989/emerita.2014.07.1312.

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Heath, Malcolm. "Greek Literature." Greece and Rome 63, no. 2 (September 16, 2016): 251–55. http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s0017383516000127.

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Let us begin, as is proper, with the gods rich in praise – or, more precisely, with The Gods Rich in Praise, one of three strikingly good monographs based on doctoral theses that will appear in this set of reviews. Christopher Metcalf examines the relations between early Greek poetry and the ancient Near East, focusing primarily on hymnic poetry. This type of poetry has multiple advantages: there is ample primary material, it displays formal conservatism, and there are demonstrable lines of translation and adaptation linking Sumerian, Akkadian, and Hittite texts. The Near Eastern material is presented in the first three chapters; four chapters examine early Greek poetry. Two formal aspects are selected for analysis (hymnic openings and negative predication), and two particular passages: the birth of Aphrodite in Theogony 195–206, and the mention of a dream interpreter in Iliad 1.62–4. In this last case, Metcalf acknowledges the possibility of transmission, while emphasizing the process of ‘continuous adaptation and reinterpretation’ (225) that lie behind the Homeric re-contextualization. In general, though, his detailed analyses tend to undermine the ‘argument by accumulation’ by which West and others have tried to demonstrate profound and extensive Eastern influence on early Greek poetry. Metcalf finds no evidence for formal influence: ‘in the case of hymns, Near Eastern influence on early Greek poetry was punctual (i.e. restricted to particular points) at the most, but certainly not pervasive’ (3). His carefully argued case deserves serious attention.
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Clayman, Dee L. "Sigmatism in Greek Poetry." Transactions of the American Philological Association (1974-) 117 (1987): 69. http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/283960.

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Thalmann, William G., and David Mulroy. "Early Greek Lyric Poetry." Classical World 87, no. 6 (1994): 522. http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/4351591.

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Dissertations / Theses on the topic "Greek poetry"

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Ahern, Liam Thomas. "The Poet’s Eye: Autopsy and Authority in Early Greek Poetry." Thesis, The University of Sydney, 2015. http://hdl.handle.net/2123/13510.

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Traditionally associated with the intellectual revolution of the 6th and 5th centuries B.C. and especially a hallmark of the historiographical authors Herodotus and Thucydides, earlier engagements with the concept of autopsy are often seen as self-explanatory and responding to a basic human sensibility, that is, “I have seen it for myself and therefore know it”. This thesis instead engages with poetic autopsy on its own terms. I examine the rhetorical function of autopsy, its role in the creation of authority and legitimacy. I enquire, in some ways, into the cultural contingency of autopsy, but only in so far as it reveals the structures of authority in and around early Greek poetry. Divided into two chapters, this thesis takes a holistic view towards the study of Greek poetry, taking into account not only the texts as we have them, but also their surrounding apparatus. The first chapter looks at the rhetorical strategies of poetic language in regards to autoptic claims, both by the narrator and by figures internal to the text. The second chapter considers the world outside the text through an analysis of paratexts and what I have termed extratext (that is performance context, biographical works, local tradition and early reception). I consider how these theatres of poetic representation lead to new readings of autopsy in the corpus at hand. I ultimately argue for a reassessment of the heritage of historiography and a more complex reading of the rhetorical place of epistemological thought in early Greek poetry.
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Giannakopoulou, Aglaia. "Ancient Greek sculpture in modern Greek poetry, 1860-1960." Thesis, King's College London (University of London), 2000. http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.322258.

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Cazzato, Vanessa. "Imaginative worlds in Greek lyric poetry." Thesis, University of Oxford, 2011. http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.559804.

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The thesis examines the imagery of Archaic Greek lyric poetry and its relation to the 'here and now' and to the implied context of performance. Chapter One sets out the conceptual programme and establishes a critical vocabulary. Various theoretical notions are discussed which are drawn from linguistics (deixis and deictic field), philosophy (reference, language games, and possible worlds), and modern literary theory (fictional worlds and text worlds); some new critical tools are established (,imaginative worlds', visual analogies and 'representational planes', the idea of 'degrees of reference'). Chapter Two sets the scene by looking at specific examples drawn from sympotic imagery shared by pottery and poetry. The rest of the thesis exemplifies the theory set out initially through a series of close readings from a broad selection of Archaic Greek monody. The close readings start with smaller scale fragments which conjure up worlds corresponding to circumscribed situations, and progress to poems which conjure up more extensive worlds. Chapters Three, Four, and Five look at diverse kinds of erotic poetry drawn respectively from Anacreon, Ibycus, and Archilochus. Chapter Six takes as its subject- matter the martial elegy of Callinus, Tyrteus, and Mimnermus. Chapter Seven moves from poetry which conjures up a markedly heroic world to poetry which conjures a contrasting unheroic world: the iambic poetry of Hipponax. Chapter Eight turns to a political poem by Solon. Chapter Nine concludes the thesis in a ring composition by returning to erotic poetry (Sappho's) and to the theoretical considerations set out in Chapter One.
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Agócs, P. A. "Talking song in early Greek poetry." Thesis, University College London (University of London), 2011. http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/1317722/.

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The thesis is a contribution to the study of early Greek poetics. It surveys general terms for speaking and singing in early Greek poetry from a foothold in performance theory, narratology and the ethnography of speaking, examining the pragmatics of these terms, the values and ideas about poetics, performance, literary tradition and textuality that they imply, and the contribution they make to the self-fashioning of poetic voice. The main focus is the interaction of early fifth-century choral melos’ with older hexameter traditions (Homer, Hesiod, and the Hymns), though Attic tragedy and comedy are also taken where necessary into account. The argument, which attempts both to correct old misprisions through a more thorough reading of the primary sources and to provide new interpretations of familiar texts, falls into three main parts. The first is a study of the most important Greek terms for song and singing: hymnos, melos, molpe, oime, and aoide. The second chapter studies the values that attach to song, and aoide and related concepts in particular, examining how the terms and implied values of Homeric and Hesiodic singing are used in the metapoetic discourse of fifth-century praise-poetry to articulate a complex vision of song’s tradition and functions. The third chapter begins with a survey of speech-terms (particularly epos, mythos, and logos) across the corpus of early Greek song, designed to elucidate the background of meanings available to early fifth-century poets. It continues with a close examination of how speech-terms are used, together with words for song, to create the sense of a speaking voice so crucial to melic praise, to mark themes and phases in the lyric argument, to express a sense of the ode as a verbal object with an existence both in and outside performance, and to articulate a wider sense of oral tradition. The conclusions draw the main themes of the argument together in an analysis of types of melic textuality and voice. The material in the chapters is supplemented by appendices which provide both discussion of key passages, and catalogues of important material to which the text alludes, but which it does not discuss in detail.
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Dandoulakis, G. "The struggle for Greek liberation : The contributions of Greek and English poetry." Thesis, Loughborough University, 1985. http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.354293.

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Metcalf, Christopher Michael Simon. "Aspects of early Greek and Babylonian hymnic poetry." Thesis, University of Oxford, 2013. http://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:70c45666-9768-41ac-bf42-5b5e1926d6d6.

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This thesis is a case study of early Greek poetry in comparison to the literature of the ancient Near East, especially Mesopotamia, based on a selection of hymns (or: songs in praise of gods) mainly in Sumerian, Akkadian, Hittite and Greek. Chapters 1–3 present the core groups of primary sources from the ancient Near East: Old Babylonian Sumerian, Old Babylonian Akkadian, Hittite. The aim of these chapters is to analyse the main features of style and content of Sumerian and Akkadian hymnic poetry, and to show how certain compositions were translated and adapted beyond Mesopotamia (such as in Hittite). Chapter 4 contains introductory remarks on early Greek hymnic poetry accompanied by some initial comparative observations. On the basis of the primary sources presented in Chapters 1–4, the second half of the thesis investigates selected elements of form and content in a comparative perspective: hymnic openings (Chapter 5), negative predication (Chapter 6), the birth of Aphrodite in the Theogony of Hesiod (Chapter 7), and the origins and development of a phrase in Hittite prayers and the Iliad of Homer (Chapter 8). The conclusion of Chapters 4–6 is that, in terms of form and style, early Greek hymns were probably not indebted to ancient Near Eastern models. This contradicts some current thinking in Classical scholarship, according to which Near Eastern influence was pervasive in early Greek poetry in general. Chapters 7–8 argue that such influence may nevertheless be perceived in certain closely defined instances, particularly where supplementary evidence from other ancient sources is available, and where the extant sources permit a reconstruction of the process of translation and adaptation. Hence this thesis seeks to contribute to the current debate on early Greek and ancient Near Eastern literature with a detailed analysis of a selected group of primary sources.
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Marks, James Richard. "Divine plan and narrative plan in archaic Greek epic /." Digital version:, 2001. http://wwwlib.umi.com/cr/utexas/fullcit?p3026208.

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Holt, Timothy. "Fighting in the shadow of epic : the motivations of soldiers in early Greek lyric poetry." Thesis, University of Oxford, 2017. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:0e705e39-2ba1-4ac0-9833-f4f6afb04af2.

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This thesis explores the theme of the motivation of soldiers in Greek lyric poetry while holding it up against the backdrop of epic. The motivation of soldiers expressed in lyric poetry depicts a complex system that demanded cohesion across various spheres in life. This system was designed to create and maintain social, communal, and political cohesion as well as cohesion in the ranks. The lyric poems reveal a mutually beneficial relationship between citizen and polis whereby the citizens were willing to fight and potentially die on behalf of the state, and in return they received prominence and rewards within the community. It is no coincidence that these themes were so common in a genre that was popular at the same time as the polis and citizen army were both developing.
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Dimopoulou, Ekaterina. "Human and divine responsibility in archaic Greek poetry." Thesis, University of Glasgow, 2001. http://theses.gla.ac.uk/3477/.

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The purpose of my thesis is to examine the relation between the human and the divine in the Homeric poems, and define thereupon the limits of human and divine responsibility. To this end I particularly focus on the Homeric concepts of fate and divine justice, as these are expressed mainly by the terms and . Nonetheless, since the Greek terms do not always coincide in their semantics with the respective terms of any modern language, it is regarded as necessary that the field of each term be defined prior to the examination of the concepts themselves. Similarly, issues such as morality and Homeric ethics have to be raised, since they form the basis upon which any discussion of Homeric thought can rely. The Iliad and the Odyssey employ the two basic ideas of fate and divine justice each in a discrete manner, and this requires that each poem be examined separately. A comparison between the two works, necessary for a more overall idea of the Homeric world and the Homeric compositions, is incorporated in the chapter on the Odyssey.
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Ladianou, Aikaterini. "Logos Gynaikos: Feminine Voice in Archaic Greek Poetry." The Ohio State University, 2009. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1236711421.

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Books on the topic "Greek poetry"

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G, Balme M., ed. Greek lyric poetry. Amherst, Mass: Available from G. Lawall, 1994.

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Kimon, Friar, and Greece. Ypourgeion Politismou kai Episte mo n., eds. Contemporary Greek poetry. [Athens]: Greek Ministry of Culture, 1985.

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Dover, Kenneth James. Greek and the Greeks: Language, poetry, drama. Oxford, UK: B. Blackwell, 1987.

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Dorgan, Theo. Greek. Dublin: Dedalus Press, 2010.

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1943-, Mulroy David D., ed. Early Greek lyric poetry. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1992.

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Solomou, Kiriakoula. Byron and Greek poetry. Athens: National and Capodistrian University of Athens, School of Philosophy, 1990.

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Marcovich, Miroslav. Studies in Greek poetry. Atlanta, Ga: Scholars Press, 1991.

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Seminar, Langford Latin. Greek and Roman poetry, Greek and Roman historiography. Cambridge: Francis Cairns, 2005.

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Riu, Xavier, and Jaume Pòrtulas. Approaches to archaic Greek poetry. Messina: Dipartimento di scienze dell'antichità, 2012.

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Lattimore, Richmond Alexander. The poetry of Greek tragedy. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003.

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Book chapters on the topic "Greek poetry"

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Hitch, Sarah. "Tastes of Greek poetry." In Taste and the Ancient Senses, 22–44. Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon; New York, NY: Routledge, 2017. |: Routledge, 2017. http://dx.doi.org/10.4324/9781315719245-2.

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Jusdanis, Gregory. "3.4 Greek Romanticism: A Cosmopolitan Discourse." In Romantic Poetry, 269–86. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2002. http://dx.doi.org/10.1075/chlel.xvii.19jus.

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Race, William H. "Rhetoric and Lyric Poetry." In A Companion to Greek Rhetoric, 509–25. Oxford, UK: Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 2007. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/9780470997161.ch33.

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Michael, Christina. "Setting Greek Modernist Poetry to Greek Popular Music." In The Routledge Companion to Music and Modern Literature, 416–25. London: Routledge, 2022. http://dx.doi.org/10.4324/9780367237288-41.

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Rosen, Ralph M., and Catherine C. Keane. "Greco-Roman Satirical Poetry." In A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities, 381–97. Chichester, UK: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, 2013. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/9781118610657.ch23.

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Silk, Michael. "The Language of Greek Lyric Poetry." In A Companion to the Ancient Greek Language, 424–40. Oxford, UK: Wiley-Blackwell, 2010. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/9781444317398.ch28.

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Kurke, Leslie V. "Archaic Greek Poetry." In The Cambridge Companion to Archaic Greece, 141–68. Cambridge University Press, 2007. http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/ccol9780521822008.007.

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Attridge, Derek. "Late Antiquity: Latin and Greek, Private, Public, Popular." In The Experience of Poetry, 122–44. Oxford University Press, 2019. http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780198833154.003.0007.

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The fourth to sixth centuries AD witnessed considerable poetic activity, which is the subject of this chapter. Itinerant poets gave performances, and festivals flourished. Poetry in both Latin and Greek was composed, and the reading of poems remained both a public and a private activity. This chapter pays particular attention to two poets: Ausonius, as an example of a poet who wrote for private consumption, and Claudian, whose poetry was performed in public for political ends. The rise of Christianity produced a more popular body of verse derived from Jewish psalmody: hymns in Latin metres that evolved from quantitative to accentual, reflecting the loss of quantitative distinctions in the language. The same loss occurred in Greek, the language of the eastern Empire centred on Constantinople, where one verse composer of particular interest in the sixth century was Romanos the Melodist.
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"POETRY." In A Short History of Greek Literature, 109–20. Routledge, 2003. http://dx.doi.org/10.4324/9780203431795-18.

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Harder, Annette. "Miniaturization of Earlier Poetry in Greek Epigrams." In Greek Epigram from the Hellenistic to the Early Byzantine Era, 85–101. Oxford University Press, 2019. http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780198836827.003.0006.

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Chapter 6 offers a diachronic study of Hellenistic epigram with a focus on the issues of thematic and generic variety and on the reception and ‘miniaturization’ of earlier poetic genres—particularly of small-scale poetry such as elegy, bucolic poetry and various kinds of erotic poetry, but also of didactic poetry—in Hellenistic epigram. The chapter finds that, although these developments are more obvious in later epigrammatists, their seeds can be found in Callimachus and other poets of his generation. The earlier generations still carried out their thematic and generic experiments largely within the framework of funeral, dedicatory, or ecphrastic and the new subgenre of erotic epigram, while later epigrammatists grew bolder and explored the possibilities of ‘miniaturization’ much further.
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Conference papers on the topic "Greek poetry"

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Christakoudy-Konstantinidou, F. "Semiotic aspects of the concept ‘Port' in Greek interwar poetry." In VI Международная научная конференция по эллинистике памяти И.И. Ковалевой. Москва: Московский государственный университет им. М.В. Ломоносова, 2021. http://dx.doi.org/10.52607/9785190116113_99.

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Nicolosi, Anika, Monica Monachini, and Beatrice Nova. "CLARIN-IT and the Definition of a Digital Critical Edition for Ancient Greek Poetry." In Introduction. Linköping University Electronic Press, 2020. http://dx.doi.org/10.3384/ecp2020172011.

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Sun, Li. "Zhou Zuoren' Translation of Japanese and Ancient Greek Poetry and Forming of the Literary Thought of Chinese Vernacular Prose." In Proceedings of the 2017 5th International Education, Economics, Social Science, Arts, Sports and Management Engineering Conference (IEESASM 2017). Paris, France: Atlantis Press, 2018. http://dx.doi.org/10.2991/ieesasm-17.2018.53.

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Chronopoulou, Anna. "Music in the service of the directorial vision: The case study of the theatrical performance of Acharnians in 1976 by the Greek Art Theatre (Theatro Technis)." In 8th International e-Conference on Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences. Center for Open Access in Science, Belgrade, 2022. http://dx.doi.org/10.32591/coas.e-conf.08.03033c.

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Someone could claim that a well prepared, contemporary theatrical production consists of a thorough planning, a period of rehearsals and the final presentation of the work before the audience. Whether we talk about a collective theatrical organization or a hierarchical one, we should agree upon the fact that the directorial vision could be considered as the motivating gear of a theatrical performance. It is the director’s or the team’s directorial vision – in the cases of alternative, collective theatrical productions – which guides those who participate in a theatrical performance and, therefore, it is commonly accepted by actors and actresses that one should follow instructions, find his path and “build” his role as part of a team which serves a certain objective. Because of the diversity and complexity of modern productions as well as the increasing need for high quality, original performances – in terms of mise-en-scène, acting, stage and costume design, lightning and music – certain professional collaborates are called to participate in the stage of the preparation and contribute to the final aesthetics of a production. In the case of preparing the theatrical performance of an ancient Greek Comedy, the musician plays a significant role, as the choruses of ancient comedy are an integral part of this genre. The performance of the ancient Greek Comedy Acharnes in 1976 by the theatrical group of Greek Art Theatre (Theatro Technis), under the directorial guidance of Karolos Koun and the music which Christos Leontis composed for its needs, is a case study for the current thesis, the analysis of which intends to reveal the way the composer collaborated with the director and the members of the theatre company. The play, written by Aristophanes, was first taught and presented to the ancient Athenian audience in 425 B.C. The choral parts, accompanied by music and sang by the members of the chorus, have since antiquity been considered to be of significant importance for this ancient theatrical genre. It is, therefore, quite intriguing to thoroughly and methodologically examine the way the music composed for the needs of a specific performance contributed to the overall outgrowth of a contemporary attempt to present the ideas and the beliefs of an ancient Greek poet to the modern Greek theatrical audience. Did the composer follow the instructions of the director? Did he serve the directorial vision? Did he interact with the director and the members of the Greek Art Theatre? In what ways and up to what extent was music co-responsible for the commonly accepted success of this particular performance? It will be attempted to answer the above questions with the help of the composer’s personal testimony, his kind contribution of archival material from his personal files, accompanied by the simultaneous, cross-examined analysis of the performance which was filmed in 1976.
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Santamaria, Giovanni. "Merging Thresholds and New Landscapes of Knowledge." In 2019 ACSA Teachers Conference. ACSA Press, 2019. http://dx.doi.org/10.35483/acsa.teach.2019.11.

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It has become extremely important to revisit our teaching methodology along with pedagogical contents and objectives, in consideration of the impressive and sometimes overwhelming progress that the technology available to document, analyze and represent the complexity of our built and natural environments has reached, and also the role that it has been proactively playing in affecting our way of thinking, designing and building. A renewed “theory of formativity” (Pareyson)1 styles a knowledge that is generated by a constantly transforming process of “making,” in which methodologies, theoriesand learnings arise within the actions of designing and building, and mostly because of the making. Following the etymology of the Greek world2, this making could be understood as poetic way of actively participating to the changes of our environment. If we look carefully, this approach to structure the knowledge has been deeply rooted in the history and legacy of the most relevant architects and designers, as ontological condition imbedded also into the idea of progress. We have been witnessing several experimentations that have been capable of bringing theoretical explorations, such as the ones from the fields of philosophy and literature, into the realm of design and space making. These explorations reach various degrees of quality, but nevertheless they provide openings to further interesting discussions. An example of this sort could be among others, the collaboration between Eisenman and Derrida for the design proposal for Parc de la Villette in Paris of 19873, where the memory of the proposals for Cannaregio in Venice or the project “Romeo and Juliet” in Verona, are considered within the philosophical background of the criticism to the structuralism, and the projection towards a horizon of deconstruction. This concept migrated from the realm of thinking, to the one of designing and form making, in its highest sense, giving strength to role and identity within the field of architecture, of the idea of “fragment” and “text” often interrupted, following Lyotard’s suggestion4, as expression of the post-modern dimension.
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