Academic literature on the topic 'Rossby waves'

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Journal articles on the topic "Rossby waves":

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Knessl, Charles, and Joseph B. Keller. "Rossby Waves." Studies in Applied Mathematics 94, no. 4 (May 1995): 359–76. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/sapm1995944359.

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Müller, Detlev. "Trapped Rossby waves." Physical Review E 61, no. 2 (February 1, 2000): 1468–85. http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/physreve.61.1468.

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Cheverry, Christophe, Isabelle Gallagher, Thierry Paul, and Laure Saint-Raymond. "Trapping Rossby waves." Comptes Rendus Mathematique 347, no. 15-16 (August 2009): 879–84. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.crma.2009.05.007.

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Biancofiore, L., and F. Gallaire. "Counterpropagating Rossby waves in confined plane wakes." Physics of Fluids 24, no. 7 (July 2012): 074102. http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4729617.

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Avalos-Zuniga, R., F. Plunian, and K. H. Rädler. "Rossby waves andα-effect." Geophysical & Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics 103, no. 5 (October 2009): 375–96. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03091920903006099.

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Miles, John. "Resonantly Forced Rossby Waves." Journal of Physical Oceanography 15, no. 4 (April 1985): 467–74. http://dx.doi.org/10.1175/1520-0485(1985)015<0467:rfrw>2.0.co;2.

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Fedotova, Maria, Dmitry Klimachkov, and Arakel Petrosyan. "Resonant interactions of magneto-Poincaré and magneto-Rossby waves in quasi-two-dimensional rotating astrophysical plasma." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 509, no. 1 (October 14, 2021): 314–26. http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/mnras/stab2957.

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ABSTRACT Increased interest in research of non-linear resonant interactions of waves in rotating astrophysical plasma has taken place in recent years. This is due to the discovering solar magneto-Rossby waves and the emergence of new data on the effect of three-wave interactions of magneto-Rossby waves on solar activity. In context of large-scale magnetohydrodynamic flows in presence of rotation, magneto-Poincaré waves and magneto-Rossby waves are highlighted. The β-plane approximation is developed to simplify the theory of spherical Rossby waves. Nevertheless, the representation of the Coriolis force in this approximation contains a latitude-independent term that ensures the existence of magneto-Poincaré waves on β-plane along with magneto-Rossby waves. In this paper, it is shown that they satisfy the phase matching condition, which leads to emergence of new non-linear interactions mechanisms of waves: two magneto-Poincaré waves and one magneto-Rossby wave; two magneto-Rossby waves and one magneto-Poincaré. Complete dispersion equations on β-plane in quasi-two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic approximation is analysed both for homogeneous and stratified astrophysical plasma with vertical magnetic field. New dispersion relations for magneto-Poincaré waves on β-plane are obtained. Detailed qualitative analysis of the phase matching condition is carried out, and new types of three-wave interactions of magneto-Poincaré waves and magneto-Rossby waves are found. Three-wave interactions are studied and instabilities of the decay and amplification type are investigated.
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Gorman, Arthur D. "On caustics associated with Rossby waves." Applications of Mathematics 41, no. 5 (1996): 321–28. http://dx.doi.org/10.21136/am.1996.134329.

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Egger, Joseph. "Counterpropagating Rossby waves and barotropic instability." Meteorologische Zeitschrift 16, no. 5 (October 26, 2007): 581–85. http://dx.doi.org/10.1127/0941-2948/2007/0239.

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Dörnbrack, Andreas, Stephen D. Eckermann, Bifford P. Williams, and Julie Haggerty. "Stratospheric Gravity Waves Excited by a Propagating Rossby Wave Train—A DEEPWAVE Case Study." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences 79, no. 2 (February 2022): 567–91. http://dx.doi.org/10.1175/jas-d-21-0057.1.

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Abstract Stratospheric gravity waves observed during the DEEPWAVE research flight RF25 over the Southern Ocean are analyzed and compared with numerical weather prediction (NWP) model results. The quantitative agreement of the NWP model output and the tropospheric and lower-stratospheric observations is remarkable. The high-resolution NWP models are even able to reproduce qualitatively the observed upper-stratospheric gravity waves detected by an airborne Rayleigh lidar. The usage of high-resolution ERA5 data—partially capturing the long internal gravity waves—enabled a thorough interpretation of the particular event. Here, the observed and modeled gravity waves are excited by the stratospheric flow past a deep tropopause depression belonging to an eastward-propagating Rossby wave train. In the reference frame of the propagating Rossby wave, vertically propagating hydrostatic gravity waves appear stationary; in reality, of course, they are transient and propagate horizontally at the phase speed of the Rossby wave. The subsequent refraction of these transient gravity waves into the polar night jet explains their observed and modeled patchy stratospheric occurrence near 60°S. The combination of both unique airborne observations and high-resolution NWP output provides evidence for the one case investigated in this paper. As the excitation of such gravity waves persists during the quasi-linear propagation phase of the Rossby wave’s life cycle, a hypothesis is formulated that parts of the stratospheric gravity wave belt over the Southern Ocean might be generated by such Rossby wave trains propagating along the midlatitude waveguide.

Dissertations / Theses on the topic "Rossby waves":

1

Cotto, Amaryllis. "Intermittently Forced Vortex Rossby Waves." Text, FIU Digital Commons, 2012. http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/553.

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Wavelike spiral asymmetries are an intriguing aspect of Tropical Cyclone dynamics. Previous work hypothesized that some of them are Vortex Rossby Waves propagating on the radial gradient of mean–flow relative vorticity. In the Intermittently Forced Vortex Rossby Wave theory, intermittent convection near the eyewall wind maximum excites them so that they propagate wave energy outward and converge angular momentum inward. The waves’ energy is absorbed as the perturbation vorticity becomes filamented near the outer critical radii where their Doppler–shifted frequencies and radial group velocities approaches zero. This process may initiate outer wind maxima by weakening the mean–flow just inward from the critical radius. The waves are confined to a relatively narrow annular waveguide because of their slow tangential phase velocity and the narrow interval between the Rossby wave cut–off frequency, where the radial wavenumber is locally zero, and the zero frequency, where it is locally infinite.
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Proehl, Jeffrey A. "Equatorial wave-mean flow interaction : the long Rossby waves /." Theses, Connect to this title online; UW restricted, 1988. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/10960.

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Murphy, Darryl Guy. "Rossby waves in the Southern Ocean." Electronic Thesis or Diss., University of Exeter, 1991. http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.303178.

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Wood, R. G. "Rossby waves in mid-latitude oceans." Electronic Thesis or Diss., University of Essex, 1987. http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.379474.

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Kovalam, Sujata. "MF radar observations of tides and planetary waves." Title page, contents and abstract only, 2000. http://web4.library.adelaide.edu.au/theses/09PH/09phk878.pdf.

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Copies of previously published articles inserted. Bibliography: p. 185-200. Data obtained from six radar stations covering a wide latitude range has been used to determine the global distribution of planetary waves and tides. In the process a number of data analyses techniques were considered for their characterisation.
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Fyfe, John. "A barotropic stability study of free and forced planetary waves /." Electronic Thesis or Diss., McGill University, 1987. http://digitool.Library.McGill.CA:80/R/?func=dbin-jump-full&object_id=75433.

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The stability of free and forced planetary waves in a $ beta$-channel is investigated with a barotropic model. The forced waves at equilibrium result from a constant mean-zonal wind interacting with a finite-amplitude topography.
The frequencies of all infinitesimal perturbations to the equilibrium flows are determined numerically as a function of the flow parameters. The results are interpreted using a truncated spectral model and related to those of previous studies with infinite $ beta$-planes. In contrast to some earlier analytical studies we find that unstable long waves $(L sb{x}$ $>$ $L sb{y})$ exist under superresonant conditions. We also report on the existence of an interesting travelling topographic instability.
The linear instability of a weakly non-zonal flow is investigated numerically and analytically (via WKB theory). The theory reproduces the qualitative nature of the numerically-determined fastest-growing mode.
Nonlinear integrations, involving many degrees of freedom, reveal that initially-infinitesimal disturbances may grow explosively to finite-amplitude. The longer-term integrations are interpreted using a statistical mechanical model.
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Giannitsis, Constantine 1971. "Non-linear saturation of vertically propagating Rossby waves." Thesis, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2001. http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/53043.

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Thesis (Ph.D.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, February 2001.
Includes bibliographical references (p. 203-208).
Linear quasi-geostrophic theory predicts an exponential amplitude increase with height for Rossby waves propagating vertically through a stratified atmosphere, as a result of wave activity density conservation. At the same time layer-wise conservation of potential enstrophy constrains wave amplitudes, given the limited amount of potential enstrophy available in the initial mean flow. A break down of linear theory is thus expected above a certain critical wave amplitude, raising the question of how the non-linear flow reacts to limit the vertical penetration of waves. Keeping in mind the potential importance for the dynamics of the winter stratosphere, where strong wave penetration and amplitude growth are often observed, the issue of wave saturation in a non-linear flow is examined in a generally abstract context, through a variety of simple model studies. We thus consider the cases of a topographically forced barotropic beta plane channel model, of vertical propagation through a three-dimensional beta plane channel model, and of a polar coordinate model with realistic basic state and geometry. In the barotropic model transient wave growth is forced through the use of bottom topography and the deviations of the non-linear flow evolution from the predictions of both a linear and a quasi-linear analytical solution are examined for strong topographic anomalies. The growth of the forced wave is found to decelerate the zonal mean flow which in turn reduces the topographic forcing. Wave-mean flow interactions are thus found to be sufficient in leading to saturation of the eddy amplitudes. Interestingly it is the formation of zonal mean easterlies, rather than the depletion of mean available potential enstrophy, that is found to be the crucial factor in the saturation dynamics. Similar results are obtained for the case of vertical propagation through a three dimensional beta plane channel. The vertical penetration of the forced wave is shown to cause a reduction of the zonal mean winds and mean potential vorticity gradients in the center of the channel, eventually leading to the formation of either a critical line or a refractive index turning surface. In both cases the penetration of the wave to high altitudes is prohibited, thus constraining wave amplitudes. While signs of non-linear behaviour are clear in synoptic maps of potential vorticity, wave-wave interactions are found to play a secondary role in the saturation process. The results of the three-dimensional beta plane channel model are then extended to a more realistic set-up, using a polar coordinate model with a basic state based on the observed winter stratosphere climatology. The basic conclusions of the idealized study are shown to remain unchanged.
by Constantine Giannitsis.
Ph.D.
8

Ash, Ellis R. "Rossby waves and mean currents in the Southern Ocean." Electronic Thesis or Diss., University of Edinburgh, 2000. http://hdl.handle.net/1842/11542.

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Dynamics in the Southern Ocean are dominated by the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), and this large eastward current has an important influence on the earth's climate. Output from the last six years of the Fine Resolution Antarctic Model, where the mean flow is known, is used to develop techniques for quantifying Rossby waves and eddy activity. Some eastward jets in the mean flow are found to act as waveguides for Rossby waves. Phase speeds are found to increase linearly with frequency, but do not vary with the strength of mean flow. The reason for this is demonstrated using the dispersion relation, but it is shown that Rossby waves cannot be used to measure mean flows in the ACC without a further understanding of the theory involved. A property of the time-average eddy activity, known as the eddy orientation angle, is shown to indicate the axes of the prominent eastward jets in the mean flow. This shows that eddies are acting to force these jets. Five yeas of measurements from the TOPEX/POSEIDON satellite mission are used to identify Rossby waves in the real ocean. Coherent Rossby wave propagation is again confined to localised regions, some of which act as waveguides. Phase speeds are measured in these regions, and shown to be consistent with previous measurements of Rossby waves. An improved resolution dataset, combining TOPEX/POSEIDON and ERS altimetry measurements, is used to analyse the time-average eddy activity and associated forcing on the mean flow in unprecedented detail. Current data from cruises of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment are used in conjunction with altimetry data to estimate the mean flow at locations along ship tracks. Using these estimates, and the position of temperature fronts as an indication of prominent jets in the mean flow, the eddy forcing is shown to be different to that observed in FRAM. Instead of forcing the mean flow, eddies are being generated within the jets which are likely to be maintained by topographic forcing.
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Yang, Gui-Ying. "Propagation of nonstationary Rossby waves and extratropical-tropical interaction." Electronic Thesis or Diss., University of Reading, 1997. http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.646005.

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The propagation of Rossby waves with positive and negative frequency, corresponding to eastward and westward phase speeds respectively, is investigated. The techniques used are theoretical analysis, ray tracing, and initial value problems in barotropic and baroclinic numerical models. It is found that the characteristics of positive and negative frequency Rossby waves can differ significantly from each other andfrom those of stationary, zero frequency Rossby waves. However, general deductions from studies of stationary Rossby waves are still found to be valid. Using an analytic Gill-type model and a dry primitive equation model with only idealised vorticity or thermal forcing, a possible trigger mechanism for the Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO) has been studied. The results show that eastward moving forcing in the subtropics or extratropics can lead to a significant equatorial Kelvin wave response which tends to be a maximum in the African/Indian Ocean sector, and is enhanced by easterly winds in the upper troposphere. It is suggested . that one mechanism for initiating the MJO is for eastward moving extratropical waves to excite a large equatorial response, sufficient to trigger large-scale convection, in the presence of favourable easterly winds in the upper troposphere. The dry primitive equation model is used to study the possible interaction of atmospheric flow in the two hemispheres and the triggering of other equatorial waves. It is found that stationary and westward moving forcing in the Northern Hemisphere extratropics can give a significant Southern Hemisphere response. A westward moving forcing in the subtropics, with a period of several days, can trigger the equatorial mixed Rossby-gravity and n=l Rossby waves. The zonal basic flow is found to have a significant effect on these equatorial wave responses.
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Jonsson, Eskil. "Modelling the Formation and Propagation of Orographic Rossby Waves." Student thesis, Uppsala universitet, Luft-, vatten och landskapslära, 2017. http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-325188.

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Orographic Rossby waves are the main mechanism by which the jet streams meander aroundthe Earth and have possibly far-reaching impacts on weather and climate (chapter 1). Hence,they are of particular importance to study and this project should serve as a starting point inwhat to consider when trying to model these waves. For example, we have to account forpressure gradients, Coriolis effect, orography, potential vorticity conservation and also Earth’scurvature at this scale. These are covered in detail in ch. 2 and adapted to the Shallow WaterEquations. In addition, some entry-level numerical techniques for solving these equations arepresented throughout ch. 2.4 and then implemented for the global-scale Shallow WaterEquations with conserved potential vorticity in ch. 3. The model is validated to work for typicalshallow water flows in a bath tub and passes common tests like the Gaussian curve test (ch.4.1). However, when considering atmospheric flows (ch. 4.2) it becomes evident that ourmodel, as well as our numerical methods are lacking and cannot reproduce Rossby waves ina stable manner. Hence, a heavily modified version of Hogan’s model (Hogan, n.d) isemployed with a simplified numerical scheme. With these corrections, orographic Rossbywaves appear to naturally form at appropriate locations. However, they do not fully exhibit theexpected behaviours discussed in ch. 2.2. Even Hogan’s model appears to have severelimitations as waves propagate in the wrong direction. Hence, this study is not complete andwarrants further development in order to be useful.
Orografiska Rossby-vågor är den huvudsakliga mekanismen genom vilken jetströmmarnaslingrar runt jorden och kan ha en omfattande inverkan på väder och klimat (kapitel 1). Därförär de av särskild betydelse att studera och detta projekt bör fungera som en utgångspunkt förvad man måste överväga när man försöker modellera dessa vågor. Till exempel så måste vi tahänsyn till tryckgradienter, Coriolis-effekten, orografi, potentiell vorticitetsbevarande och ävenjordens krökning på denna skala. Dessa beskrivs i detalj i kap. 2 och anpassas tillrörelseekvationerna för grunt vatten (Saint-Venant-ekvationerna). Därefter presenteras någranumeriska tekniker på grundläggande nivå för att lösa dessa ekvationer i kap. 2.4, varvid desedan implementeras för de globala Saint-Venant-ekvationerna med bevarad potentiellvorticitet i kap 3. Modellen är validerad för typiska grunda vattenflöden i ett badkar ochpasserar vanliga numeriska tester så som Gauss-kurvtestet (kap. 4.1) och bore-testet. Mennär vi överväger atmosfäriska flöden (kap. 4.2) blir det tydligt att våra modeller och numeriskametoder är primitiva och inte kan reproducera Rossby-vågor på ett stabilt sätt. Därmed,modifierar vi Hogans modell (Hogan, n.d) för att passa vår modell vilket resulterar orografiskaRossby-vågor. Dock så är dessa förskjutna och stämmer inte riktigt överens med teorin i kap.2.2. Även Hogans modell visar sig ha allvarliga begränsningar då vågorna propagerar i felriktning. Därmed är denna studie ej komplett och kräver ytterligare utveckling för att varaanvändbar.

Books on the topic "Rossby waves":

1

Stanford, John. Rossby-gravity waves in tropical total ozone data. [Washington, DC: National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 1993.

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Stanford, John. Rossby-gravity waves in tropical total ozone data. [Washington, DC: National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 1993.

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Volland, Hans. Atmospheric tidal and planetary waves. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1988.

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Chiu, Ching-Sang. Estimation of planetary wave parameters from the data of the 1981 Ocean Acoustic Tomography Experiment. Woods Hole, Mass: Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 1985.

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Kelley, Michael C. Aspects of weather and space weather in the earth's upper atmosphere: The role of internal atmospheric waves. Washington, D.C: National Academy Press, 1997.

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Haack, Tracy. Mixed convective/dynamic roll vortices and their effects on initial wind and temperature profiles. University Park, PA: Dept. of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University, 1991.

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Kessler, William S. Observations of long Rossby waves in the northern tropical Pacific. Seattle, Wash: U.S. Dept. of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Environmental Research Laboratories, 1989.

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Grigorkina, R. G. Vozdeĭstvie taĭfunov na okean. Leningrad: Gidrometeoizdat, 1986.

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Grigorkina, R. G. Vozdeĭstvie taĭfunov na okean. Leningrad: Gidrometeoizdat, 1986.

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Swart, H. E. de. Vacillation and predictability properties of low-order atmospheric spectral models. Amsterdam, the Netherlands: Centrum voor Wiskunde en Informatica, 1989.

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Book chapters on the topic "Rossby waves":

1

Zeytounian, Radyadour. "Rossby Waves." In Asymptotic Modeling of Atmospheric Flows, 44–62. Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 1990. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-73800-5_4.

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Monin, A. S. "Rossby Waves." In Theoretical Geophysical Fluid Dynamics, 237–75. Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands, 1990. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-94-009-1880-1_7.

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Pedlosky, Joseph. "Rossby Waves." In Waves in the Ocean and Atmosphere, 149–58. Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2003. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-05131-3_14.

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Kamenkovich, V. M., M. N. Koshlyakov, and A. S. Monin. "Theory of Rossby Waves." In Synoptic Eddies in the Ocean, 34–130. Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands, 1986. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-94-009-4502-9_2.

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Pedlosky, Joseph. "Rossby Waves (Continued), Quasi-Geostrophy." In Waves in the Ocean and Atmosphere, 159–71. Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2003. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-05131-3_15.

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Dolzhansky, Felix V. "The Obukhov–Charney Equation; Rossby Waves." In Fundamentals of Geophysical Hydrodynamics, 61–70. Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2013. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-31034-8_7.

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Skiba, Yuri N. "Stability of Rossby-Haurwitz (RH) Waves." In Mathematical Problems of the Dynamics of Incompressible Fluid on a Rotating Sphere, 109–33. Cham: Springer International Publishing, 2017. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-65412-6_5.

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Boyd, John P. "Kelvin, Yanai, Rossby and Gravity Waves." In Dynamics of the Equatorial Ocean, 35–67. Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2017. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-55476-0_3.

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Pedlosky, Joseph. "Energy and Energy Flux in Rossby Waves." In Waves in the Ocean and Atmosphere, 173–82. Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2003. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-05131-3_16.

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Sardeshmukh, Prashant, Cécile Penland, and Matthew Newman. "Rossby waves in a stochastically fluctuating medium." In Stochastic Climate Models, 369–84. Basel: Birkhäuser Basel, 2001. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-0348-8287-3_17.

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Conference papers on the topic "Rossby waves":

1

Zaqarashvili, T. V., and Ivan Zhelyazkov. "Rossby Waves in Rotating Magnetized Fluids." In SPACE PLASMA PHYSICS: School of Space Plasma Physics. AIP, 2009. http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3137937.

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Sukoriansky, Semion, Nadejda Dikovskaya, Roger Grimshaw, and Boris Galperin. "Rossby waves and zonons in zonostrophic turbulence." In WAVES AND INSTABILITIES IN SPACE AND ASTROPHYSICAL PLASMAS. AIP, 2012. http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3701355.

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Chen, Y. N., U. Haupt, U. Seidel, and M. Rautenberg. "Experimental Investigation of the Longitudinal-Vortex-Nature of Rotating Stall in Vaneless Diffusers of Centrifugal Compressors." In ASME 1991 International Gas Turbine and Aeroengine Congress and Exposition. American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 1991. http://dx.doi.org/10.1115/91-gt-099.

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Rotating stall in a vaneless diffuser of a centrifugal compressor has been found to be guided by Rossby waves, which are composed of branches of high and low pressures (Chen, Haupt and Rautenberg, 1990a). The branch of the high pressure leads the unstalled region and that of the low pressure leads the stalled region. The phase velocity of the Rossby waves is then the pattern speed of the stall cell. We report here an additional experimental result, according to which the flow of rotating stall is composed of a longitudinal spiral vortex pair. The vorticity and the axis of the longitudinal vortex were measured by means of two pressure transducers fixed at a distance of 2 mm to the opposite walls of the diffuser downstream of its inlet. The analysis of the experimental result of Tsurusaki, Imaichi and Miyake (1987) about the fields of the total and fluctuating velocities of rotating stall in the vaneless diffuser reveals furthermore that the longitudinal spiral vortex is centred on the through flow. The two vortices of the pair stay side by side in touch but without mixing because of their opposite rotational sense. The longitudinal vortices make about 1 1/4 turns from the inlet to the outlet of the diffuser under the guidance of the Rossby waves. The vorticity of the longitudinal vortex is determined from the experimental result. Furthermore, the experimental result reveals that the fronts along the high pressure ridges and the low pressure troughs of the Rossby wave pattern are themselves longitudinal vortices. Then these fronts possess a behaviour of the jet stream, which is associated with the Rossby waves of the atmosphere in the midlatitude. Finally, the origin of the vorticity of the longitudinal vortices along the through flow and the Rossby-wave front is derived based on the experimental results obtained by Hergt and Jaberg (1988), and Hide (1958).
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Campbell, L. J. "Nonlinear dynamics of Rossby waves in a western boundary current." In ADVANCES IN FLUID MECHANICS 2006. Southampton, UK: WIT Press, 2006. http://dx.doi.org/10.2495/afm06045.

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Chu, Peter C., and Chin-Lung Fang. "Observed Rossby waves in the South China Sea from satellite altimetry data." In Remote Sensing, edited by Charles R. Bostater, Jr. and Rosalia Santoleri. SPIE, 2004. http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.509064.

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del-Castillo-Negrete, D., J. M. Finn, and D. C. Barnes. "The modified drift-Poisson model: Analogies with geophysical flows and Rossby waves." In Non-neutral plasma physics III. AIP, 1999. http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.1302113.

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7

KALADZE, T. D., D. J. WU, O. A. POKHOTELOV, R. Z. SAGDEEV, L. STENFLO, and P. K. SHUKLA. "ZONAL FLOW GENERATION BY MAGNETIZED ROSSBY WAVES IN THE IONOPHERIC E-LAYER." In Proceedings of the 12th Regional Conference. WORLD SCIENTIFIC, 2007. http://dx.doi.org/10.1142/9789812770523_0026.

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8

Morey, Steve, Dmitry Dukhovskoy, and Cortis K. Cooper. "SS: Metocean: Measurements and Modeling Measurements of Topographic Rossby Waves along the Sigsbee Escarpment." In Offshore Technology Conference. Offshore Technology Conference, 2010. http://dx.doi.org/10.4043/20694-ms.

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9

Dai, Yuqiang, Fengxia Liu, Jintao Wu, Wei Wei, Dapeng Hu, and Xuewu Liu. "Influence of Skewing of Contact Face on Performance of Wave Rotor Refrigerators and Superchargers." In ASME 2013 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition. American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 2013. http://dx.doi.org/10.1115/imece2013-63449.

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Abstract:
As a novel generation of rotational gas wave machines, wave rotor machines such as wave rotor refrigerators (WRR) and wave rotor superchargers (WRS) are unsteady flow devices. In their passages two gas streams (with different pressure or even different phases) comes into direct contact can exchange energy due to the movement of shock waves and expansion waves. A detailed study shows that, when rotor channels open to the high pressure port gradually, the contact face in rotor channels inevitably skews, which is always accompanied with reflection of shockwaves. This causes very large energy dissipation and influences adversely on the refrigeration performance of WRR or the supercharging performance of WRS. In this work, factors such as centrifugal forces, Coriolis forces, gradual channel opening and gradual channel closing, etc, which influence the wave transportation and skewing of shock waves and contact faces are studied by means of computational fluid dynamics and experiments. The skewing of contact faces causes uneven distribution of velocity and large local loss. With rotation Mach number smaller than 0.3, the skewing of contact face can be alleviated. To reduce the adverse influence of rotation Mach number, a smaller rotor channel width or higher rotational speed is necessary. The rotation effect plays an important role for the skewing of gas discontinuities. Both the centrifugal and Coriolis forces of wave rotor cannot be ignored with the Rossby number of 1.3∼3.5. To reduce the skewing loss of contact face, a lower rotational speed seems necessary. The rotation speed of wave rotors has dialectical influences on the skewing of shock waves and contact faces. The jetting width of high pressure port is the key factor of the gradual opening of rotor channels. A feasible way to reduce skewing losses of gas waves is to optimize the ratio between high pressure port width and channel width. The validation experiments have got at least 3∼5% rise of isentropic efficiency for WRRs.
10

Chen, Y. N., D. Hagelstein, U. Haupt, and M. Rautenberg. "Excitation Mechanism for Standing Stall of Centrifugal Compressors." In ASME 1998 International Gas Turbine and Aeroengine Congress and Exhibition. American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 1998. http://dx.doi.org/10.1115/98-gt-245.

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Abstract:
The standing stall of the centrifugal compressors appears with pulsating or switching pattern at operating points slightly away from the stall line. It is a weak form of the rotating stall and stands still in the absolute frame. The reverse flow of the compressed warm fluid travelling from the impeller’s outlet along the shroud surface towards the inlet is not yet powerful enough to generate rotating stall. The experimental investigations revealed that in the low-flow-rate off-design region, the inlet flow to the impeller has a large positive incidence angle. Nose bubbles are formed on the suction surface of the blade after the leading edge. Once the reverse flow as a pressure wave reaches the inlet of the blades, the nose bubble is stagnated to an enlarged size. The corresponding disturbance sends a rarefaction wave in the forward direction into the impeller. This wave of cool fluid meets the reverse pressure wave of the warm fluid at a circular front around the circumference of the impeller. Since this circular front has a weak baroclinicity, it cannot develop into Rossby waves which initiate the rotating stall. Instead it will either pulsate concentrically or switch linearly. We then experience a standing stall with the corresponding pattern.

Reports on the topic "Rossby waves":

1

Peng, Melinda S. Role of Vortex Rossby Waves on Tropical Cyclone Intensity. Fort Belvoir, VA: Defense Technical Information Center, September 2008. http://dx.doi.org/10.21236/ada532809.

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2

Peng, Melinda S. Role of Vortex Rossby Waves on Tropical Cyclone Intensity. Fort Belvoir, VA: Defense Technical Information Center, September 2007. http://dx.doi.org/10.21236/ada541436.

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3

Peng, Melinda S. Role of Vortex Rossby Waves on Tropical Cyclone Intensity. Fort Belvoir, VA: Defense Technical Information Center, September 2006. http://dx.doi.org/10.21236/ada631046.

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4

Montgomery, Michael T., and Lloyd J. Shapiro. Vortex Rossby Waves and Hurricane Evolution in the Presence of Convection and Potential Vorticity and Hurricane Motion. Fort Belvoir, VA: Defense Technical Information Center, September 1997. http://dx.doi.org/10.21236/ada628370.

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