Academic literature on the topic 'Stratigraphic Proterozoic'

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Journal articles on the topic "Stratigraphic Proterozoic":

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Wu, He Yuan, and Bin Hao. "Third-Order Sequence Division of Yunmengshan and Baicaoping Formation of Proterozoic in Yuxi District of China: an Example from Xiatang Profile in Lushan." Advanced Materials Research 998-999 (July 2014): 1492–97. http://dx.doi.org/10.4028/www.scientific.net/amr.998-999.1492.

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There are controversies on the Proterozoic stratigraphic genesis, division, correlation and palaeogeographical evolution of western Henan in China. Based on the basic description of sedimentary facies, Yunmengshan and Baicaoping formation of Proterozoic typical section in western Henan is divided into 4 third-order sequences. Sequence stratigraphy framework which reflects sedimentary and overlap is established with basis of two kinds of facies-change surface and two kinds of diachrononism in stratigraphical records. Although chronostratigraphic belonging of Precambrian strata is controversial and Precambrian sequential stratigraphic study is tremendously challenging, the establishment of sequence stratigraphy framework of proterozoic Yunmengshan and Baicaoping formation in western Henan provides actual data to reshape palaeogeographic pattern of Palaeoproterozoic North China craton. What is more, it becomes a typical example of characteristics and exploration of stratigraphic accumulation under the background of tidal action.
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Halverson, Galen P., Susannah M. Porter, and Timothy M. Gibson. "Dating the late Proterozoic stratigraphic record." Emerging Topics in Life Sciences 2, no. 2 (July 13, 2018): 137–47. http://dx.doi.org/10.1042/etls20170167.

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The Tonian and Cryogenian periods (ca. 1000–635.5 Ma) witnessed important biological and climatic events, including diversification of eukaryotes, the rise of algae as primary producers, the origin of Metazoa, and a pair of Snowball Earth glaciations. The Tonian and Cryogenian will also be the next periods in the geological time scale to be formally defined. Time-calibrating this interval is essential for properly ordering and interpreting these events and establishing and testing hypotheses for paleoenvironmental change. Here, we briefly review the methods by which the Proterozoic time scale is dated and provide an up-to-date compilation of age constraints on key fossil first and last appearances, geological events, and horizons during the Tonian and Cryogenian periods. We also develop a new age model for a ca. 819–740 Ma composite section in Svalbard, which is unusually complete and contains a rich Tonian fossil archive. This model provides useful preliminary age estimates for the Tonian succession in Svalbard and distinct carbon isotope anomalies that can be globally correlated and used as an indirect dating tool.
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Sergeeva, Nina Dmitrievna, and Viktor Nikolaevich Puchkov. "REGIONAL STRATIGRAPHIC SCHEME OF THE UPPER AND FINAL RIPHEAN AND VENDIAN DEPOSITS OF THE SOUTHERN URALS (PROJECT 2022)." Geologicheskii vestnik, no. 2 (July 14, 2022): 3–14. http://dx.doi.org/10.31084/2619-0087/2022-2-1.

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The need to correct individual stratigraphic levels of the Regional Stratigraphic Scheme of the Upper Precambrian deposits of the Urals, existing since 1993, is due to the receipt of new data from lithological-stratigraphic, geotectonic and isotope-geochronological studies of the Upper Precambrian of the Southern Urals. Significant changes and clarifications in the stratigraphy of the Upper Precambrian formations of the region occurred in the Upper Riphean and Vendian of the Bashkir meganticlinorium in the Southern Urals, where the sections stratotypical for the Riphean and reference for the Vendian are located. The results of dating igneous (primarily volcanic) rocks in the Riphean by modern methods made it possible to refine the geochronological basis of the Ural and General Stratigraphic Scale of the Upper Proterozoic of Russia and identify a new event level: the final Riphean (Arshinian), corresponding to the Arshinian series. Changes and clarifications to the correlation of local stratigraphic sections of the Upper and Final Riphean and Vendian of the Southern Urals are reflected in the draft scheme.
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Roscoe, S. M., and K. D. Card. "The reappearance of the Huronian in Wyoming: rifting and drifting of ancient continents." Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences 30, no. 12 (December 1, 1993): 2475–80. http://dx.doi.org/10.1139/e93-214.

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Striking stratigraphic and sedimentological similarities between the Early Proterozoic Huronian Supergroup of the Canadian Shield and the Snowy Pass Supergroup of Wyoming suggest that they were deposited in a single, broad, epicratonic basin developed atop a large Archean continent that included the Superior and Wyoming geological provinces. Breakup of the continent after the 2.2 Ga intrusion of widespread gabbro sheets and dykes resulted in the separation of the Archean Superior and Wyoming cratons and their Early Proterozoic covers. These crustal fragments were subsequently reassembled during Early Proterozoic (~1.85 Ga) orogenesis, the end result being the present 2000 km separation of the Huronian and Snowy Pass supergroups and their Archean basements.
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Martins-Neto, Marcelo A. "Sequence stratigraphic framework of Proterozoic successions in eastern Brazil." Marine and Petroleum Geology 26, no. 2 (February 2009): 163–76. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.marpetgeo.2007.10.001.

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Phillips, Bruce J., Alan W. James, and Graeme M. Philip. "THE GEOLOGY AND HYDROCARBON POTENTIAL OF THE NORTH-WESTERN OFFICER BASIN." APPEA Journal 25, no. 1 (1985): 52. http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/aj84004.

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Recent petroleum exploration in EP 186 and EP 187 in the north-western Officer Basin has greatly increased knowledge of the regional stratigraphy, structure and petroleum prospectivity of the region. This exploration programme has involved the drilling of two deep stratigraphic wells (Dragoon 1 and Hussar 1) and the acquisition of 1438 km of seismic data. Integration of regional gravity and aeromagnetic data with regional seismic and well data reveals that the Gibson Sub-basin primarily contains a Proterozoic evaporitic sequence. In contrast, the Herbert Sub-basin contains a Late Proterozoic to Cambrian clastic and carbonate sequence above the evaporites. This sequence, which was intersected in Hussar 1, is identified as the primary exploration target in the Western Officer Basin. The sequence contains excellent reservoir and seal rocks in association with mature source rocks. Major structuring of the basin has also been caused by compressive movements associated with the Alice Springs Orogeny. The northwestern Officer Basin thus has all of the ingredients for the discovery of commercial hydrocarbons.
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Cook, Frederick A., and Samantha M. Siegel. "From Proterozoic strata to a synthesized seismic reflection trace: implications for regional seismic reflection patterns in northwestern Canada." Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences 43, no. 11 (November 1, 2006): 1639–51. http://dx.doi.org/10.1139/e06-040.

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Calculation of a synthetic seismic reflection trace from detailed descriptions of exposed Proterozoic strata in northwestern Canada permits correlation of reflections on regional seismic profiles to surface outcrop. Approximately 5.4 km (composite thickness) of Paleo- and Mesoproterozoic strata are exposed in the Muskwa anticlinorium that is located within the foreland of the Cordillera in northeastern British Columbia. The Tuchodi anticline is the easternmost structure of the Muskwa anticlinorium and has the deepest levels of Proterozoic strata exposed. At this location, prominent seismic reflection layering rises toward the surface and is easily correlated to the deeper formations of the Muskwa assemblage stratigraphy. These layers are followed westward into the middle crust, where they are overlain by dramatically thickened (by about five times) strata, primarily of the Tuchodi Formation. Along the same line of section, the Muskwa assemblage reflections overlie additional subparallel layered reflections at depth whose lithology and origin are unknown. However, coupled with other observations, including regional refraction results that indicate the crustal layers have both low seismic p-wave velocities and low ratios of p- and s-velocities, regional gravity observations that indicate the layers are low density, and correlation to similar layers on other seismic profiles that exhibit characteristic seismic stratigraphic features, the subparallel layers that are present beneath the known Muskwa assemblage are most easily interpreted as layered Proterozoic (meta-) sedimentary rocks. These results provide the basis for interpreting the Muskwa anticlinorium as a crustal-scale structure that formed when a deep basin of Proterozoic strata was inverted and thrust over an ~20 km high footwall ramp during Cordilleran orogenesis.
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Dub, S. A. "Upper Precambrian General Stratigraphic Scale of Russia: Main problems and proposals for improvement." LITHOSPHERE (Russia) 21, no. 4 (August 28, 2021): 449–68. http://dx.doi.org/10.24930/1681-9004-2021-21-4-449-468.

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Research subject. Main problems of the General Stratigraphic Scale (GSS) of the Upper Precambrian including uncertainties in the hierarchy of subdivisions are analyzed.Results. Prospects for detailing the Upper Precambrian GSS are discussed, along with questions of its correlation with International Chronostratigraphic Chart (ICSC) and establishing the lower boundaries of chronostratigraphic subdivisions. The importance of unifying the existing views is emphasized.Conclusions. It is proposed to carry out the following reforms of GSS: to abolish Acrothemes / Acrons; to approve the Proterozoic (as well as the Archean) as an Eonotheme / Eon; to minimize the use of terms “Upper Proterozoic” and “Lower Proterozoic”; to assign the Riphean and Vendian to the rank of Erathem / Era (while preserving the status of the Vendian as a System / Period); to consider Burzyanian, Yurmatinian, Karatavian and Arshinian as Systems / Periods of the Riphean. Attention is focused on the Upper Riphean-Vendian interval. The lower boundary of the Upper Riphean (Karatavian) was proposed to establish according to the first appearance of the Trachyhystrichosphaera sp. microfossils. Then, the Terminal Riphean (Arshinian) lower boundary should be traced to the base of the tillites formed during the global Sturtian glaciation (which approximately corresponds to the base of the Cryogenian in ICSC). Apparently, the Vendian lower boundary may be raised to the level of the top of the Gaskiers tillites, as the deposits of the last major glaciation in the Precambrian. The indicated proposals are substantiated. It is necessary to form work groups to develop solutions.
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Hiatt, Eric E., T. Kurtis Kyser, Paul A. Polito, Jim Marlatt, and Peir Pufahl. "The Paleoproterozoic Kombolgie Subgroup (1.8 Ga), McArthur Basin, Australia: Sequence stratigraphy, basin evolution, and unconformity-related uranium deposits following the Great Oxidation Event." Canadian Mineralogist 59, no. 5 (September 1, 2021): 1049–83. http://dx.doi.org/10.3749/canmin.2000102.

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ABSTRACT Proterozoic continental sedimentary basins contain a unique record of the evolving Earth in their sedimentology and stratigraphy and in the large-scale, redox-sensitive mineral deposits they host. The Paleoproterozoic (Stratherian) Kombolgie Basin, located on the Arnhem Land Plateau, Northern Territory, is an exceptionally well preserved, early part of the larger McArthur Basin in northern Australia. This intracratonic basin is filled with 1 to 2 km-thick, relatively undeformed, nearly flat-lying, siliciclastic rocks of the Kombolgie Subgroup. Numerous drill cores and outcrop exposures from across the basin allow sedimentary fabrics, structures, and stratigraphic relationships to be studied in great detail, providing an extensive stratigraphic framework and record of basin development and evolution. Tectonic events controlled the internal stratigraphic architecture of the basin and led to the formation of three unconformity-bounded sequences that are punctuated by volcanic events. The first sequence records the onset of basin formation and is comprised of coarse-grained sandstone and polymict lithic conglomerate deposited in proximal braided rivers that transported sediment away from basin margins and intra-basin paleohighs associated with major uranium mineralization. Paleo-currents in the upper half of this lower sequence, as well as those of overlying sequences, are directed southward and indicate that the major intra-basin topographic highs no longer existed. The middle sequence has a similar pattern of coarse-grained fluvial facies, followed by distal fluvial facies, and finally interbedded marine and eolian facies. An interval marked by mud-rich, fine-grained sandstones and mud-cracked siltstones representing tidal deposition tops this sequence. The uppermost sequence is dominated by distal fluvial and marine facies that contain halite casts, gypsum nodules, stromatolites, phosphate, and “glauconite” (a blue-green mica group mineral), indicating a marine transgression. The repeating pattern of stratigraphic sequences initiated by regional tectonic events produced well-defined coarse-grained diagenetic aquifers capped by intensely cemented distal fluvial, shoreface, eolian, and even volcanic units, and led to a well-defined heterogenous hydrostratigraphy. Basinal brines migrated within this hydrostratigraphy and, combined with paleotopography, dolerite intrusion, faulting, and intense burial diagenesis, led to the economically important uranium deposits the Kombolgie Basin hosts. Proterozoic sedimentary basins host many of Earth's largest high-grade iron and uranium deposits that formed in response to the initial oxygenation of the hydrosphere and atmosphere following the Great Oxygenation Event. Unconformity-related uranium mineralization like that found in the Kombolgie Basin highlights the interconnected role that oxygenation of the Earth, sedimentology, stratigraphy, and diagenesis played in creating these deposits.
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Ansdell, Kevin M., T. Kurtis Kyser, Mel R. Stauffer, and Garth Edwards. "Age and source of detrital zircons from the Missi Formation: a Proterozoic molasse deposit, Trans-Hudson Orogen, Canada." Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences 29, no. 12 (December 1, 1992): 2583–94. http://dx.doi.org/10.1139/e92-205.

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The Missi Formation in the Flin Flon Basin forms part of a discontinuous series of molasse-type sediments found throughout the Early Proterozoic Trans-Hudson Orogen in northern Saskatchewan and Manitoba. The Flin Flon Basin contains a sequence of proximal-fan to braided-stream fluvial conglomerates and sandstones, which unconformably overlie subaerially weathered Amisk Group volcanic rocks. Stratigraphic way-up indicators have been preserved, even though these rocks have undergone greenschist-facies metamorphism and polyphase deformation. The sedimentary rocks are crosscut by intrusive rocks, which provide a minimum age of sedimentation of 1840 ± 7 Ma.Detrital zircons from each of the six stratigraphic subdivisions of the Flin Flon Basin were analyzed using the single-zircon Pb-evaporation technique. Euhedral to slightly rounded zircons dominate each sample, and these zircons give ages of between about 1854 and 1950 Ma. The Missi sediments were thus deposited between 1840 and 1854 Ma. Possible sources for the detrital zircons are Amisk Group felsic volcanic rocks and post-Amisk granitoid rocks and orthogneisses in adjacent domains within the Trans-Hudson Orogen. However, the immature character of the sedimentary rocks, the composition of clasts, the euhedral character of many of the zircons, and the range in ages suggest that most were likely derived from Amisk Group and granitoid rocks in the western Flin Flon Domain. Rounded zircons are uncommon but provide evidence for the reworking of older Proterozoic sedimentary rocks, or a distant Archean or Early Proterozoic granitoid terrane.

Dissertations / Theses on the topic "Stratigraphic Proterozoic":

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Strauss, Toby Anthony Lavery. "The geology of the Proterozoic Haveri Au-Cu deposit, Southern Finland." Thesis, Rhodes University, 2004. http://hdl.handle.net/10962/d1015978.

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The Haveri Au-Cu deposit is located in southern Finland about 175 km north of Helsinki. It occurs on the northern edge of the continental island arc-type, volcano-sedimentary Tampere Schist Belt (TSB) within the Palaeoproterozoic Svecofennian Domain (2.0 – 1.75 Ga) of the Fennoscandian Shield. The 1.99 Ga Haveri Formation forms the base of the supracrustal stratigraphy consisting of metavolcanic pillow lavas and breccias passing upwards into intercalated metatuffs and metatuffites. There is a continuous gradation upwards from the predominantly volcaniclastic Haveri Formation into the overlying epiclastic meta-greywackes of the Osara Formation. The Haveri deposit is hosted in this contact zone. This supracrustal sequence has been intruded concordantly by quartz-feldspar porphyries. Approximately 1.89 Ga ago, high crustal heat flow led to the generation and emplacement of voluminous synkinematic, I-type, magnetite-series granitoids of the Central Finland Granitoid Complex (CFGC), resulting in coeval high-T/low-P metamorphism (hornfelsic textures), and D₁ deformation. During the crystallisation and cooling of the granitoids, a magmatic-dominated hydrothermal system caused extensive hydrothermal alteration and Cu-Au mineralisation through the late-D₁ to early-D₂ deformation. Initially, a pre-ore Na-Ca alteration phase caused albitisation of the host rock. This was closely followed by strong Ca-Fe alteration, responsible for widespread amphibolitisation and quartz veining and associated with abundant pyrrhotite, magnetite, chalcopyrite and gold mineralisation. More localised calcic-skarn alteration is also present as zoned garnetpyroxene- epidote skarn assemblages with associated pyrrhotite and minor sphalerite, centred on quartzcalcite± scapolite veinlets. Post-ore alteration includes an evolution to more K-rich alteration (biotitisation). Late D₂-retrograde chlorite began to replace the earlier high-T assemblage. Late emanations (post-D₂ and pre-D₃) from the cooling granitoids, under lower temperatures and oxidising conditions, are represented by carbonate-barite veins and epidote veinlets. Later, narrow dolerite dykes were emplaced followed by a weak D₃ deformation, resulting in shearing and structural reactivation along the carbonate-barite bands. This phase was accompanied by pyrite deposition. Both sulphides and oxides are common at Haveri, with ore types varying from massive sulphide and/or magnetite, to networks of veinlets and disseminations of oxides and/or sulphides. Cataclastites, consisting of deformed, brecciated bands of sulphide, with rounded and angular clasts of quartz vein material and altered host-rock are an economically important ore type. Ore minerals are principally pyrrhotite, magnetite and chalcopyrite with lesser amounts of pyrite, molybdenite and sphalerite. There is a general progression from early magnetite, through pyrrhotite to pyrite indicating increasing sulphidation with time. Gold is typically found as free gold within quartz veins and within intense zones of amphibolitisation. Considerable gold is also found in the cataclastite ore type either as invisible gold within the sulphides and/or as free gold within the breccia fragments. The unaltered amphibolites of the Haveri Formation can be classified as medium-K basalts of the tholeiitic trend. Trace and REE support an interpretation of formation in a back-arc basin setting. The unaltered porphyritic rocks are calc-alkaline dacites, and are interpreted, along with the granitoids as having an arc-type origin. This is consistent with the evolution from an initial back-arc basin, through a period of passive margin and/or fore-arc deposition represented by the Osara Formation greywackes and the basal stratigraphy of the TSB, prior to the onset of arc-related volcanic activity characteristic of the TSB and the Svecofennian proper. Using a combination of petrogenetic grids, mineral compositions (garnet-biotite and hornblendeplagioclase thermometers) and oxygen isotope thermometry, peak metamorphism can be constrained to a maximum of approximately 600 °C and 1.5 kbars pressure. Furthermore, the petrogenetic grids indicate that the REDOX conditions can be constrained at 600°C to log f(O₂) values of approximately - 21.0 to -26.0 and -14.5 to -17.5 for the metasedimentary rocks and mafic metavolcanic rocks respectively, thus indicating the presence of a significant REDOX boundary. Amphibole compositions from the Ca-Fe alteration phase (amphibolitisation) indicate iron enrichment with increasing alteration corresponding to higher temperatures of formation. Oxygen isotope studies combined with limited fluid inclusion studies indicate that the Ca-Fe alteration and associated quartz veins formed at high temperatures (530 – 610°C) from low CO₂, low- to moderately saline (<10 eq. wt% NaCl), magmatic-dominated fluids. Fluid inclusion decrepitation textures in the quartz veins suggest isobaric decompression. This is compatible with formation in high-T/low-P environments such as contact aureoles and island arcs. The calcic-skarn assemblage, combined with phase equilibria and sphalerite geothermometry, are indicative of formation at high temperatures (500 – 600 °C) from fluids with higher CO₂ contents and more saline compositions than those responsible for the Fe-Ca alteration. Limited fluid inclusion studies have identified hypersaline inclusions in secondary inclusion trails within quartz. The presence of calcite and scapolite also support formation from CO₂-rich saline fluids. It is suggested that the calcic-skarn alteration and the amphibolitisation evolved from the same fluids, and that P-T changes led to fluid unmixing resulting in two fluid types responsible for the observed alteration variations. Chlorite geothermometry on retrograde chlorite indicates temperatures of 309 – 368 °C. As chlorite represents the latest hydrothermal event, this can be taken as a lower temperature limit for hydrothermal alteration and mineralisation at Haveri.The gold mineralisation at Haveri is related primarily to the Ca-Fe alteration. Under such P-T-X conditions gold was transported as chloride complexes. Ore was localised by a combination of structural controls (shears and folds) and REDOX reactions along the boundary between the oxidised metavolcanics and the reduced metasediments. In addition, fluid unmixing caused an increase in pH, and thus further augmented the precipitation of Cu and Au. During the late D₂-event, temperatures fell below 400 °C, and fluids may have remobilised Au and Cu as bisulphide complexes into the shearcontrolled cataclastites and massive sulphides. The Haveri deposit has many similarities with ore deposit models that include orogenic lode-gold deposits, certain Au-skarn deposits and Fe-oxide Cu-Au deposits. However, many characteristics of the Haveri deposit, including tectonic setting, host lithologies, alteration types, proximity to I-type granitoids and P-T-X conditions of formation, compare favourably with other Early Proterozoic deposits within the TSB and Fennoscandia, as well as many of the deposits in the Cloncurry district of Australia. Consequently, the Haveri deposit can be seen to represent a high-T, Ca-rich member of the recently recognised Fe-oxide Cu-Au group of deposits.
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Baghiyan-Yazd, Mohammad Hassan. "Palaeoichnology of the terminal Proterozoic-Early Cambrian transition in central Australia : interregional correlation and palaeoecology." Title page, table of contents and abstract only, 1998. http://web4.library.adelaide.edu.au/theses/09PH/09phb1445.pdf.

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Li, Longming, and 李龙明. "The crustal evolutionary history of the Cathaysia Block from the paleoproterozoic to mesozoic." PG_Thesis, The University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong), 2010. http://hub.hku.hk/bib/B45693596.

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Zhao, Junhong, and 趙軍紅. "Geochemistry of neoproterozoic arc-related plutons in the Western margin of the Yangtze Block, South China." PG_Thesis, The University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong), 2008. http://hub.hku.hk/bib/B40203748.

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Wang, Wei, and 王伟. "Sedimentology, geochronology and geochemistry of the proterozoic sedimentary rocks in the Yangtze Block, South China." PG_Thesis, The University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong), 2013. http://hdl.handle.net/10722/196033.

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The South China Craton comprises the Yangtze Block in the northwest and Cathaysia Block in the southeast. Located in the southeastern Yangtze Block, the Jiangnan Orogen formed through the amalgamation between the Yangtze and Cathaysia Blocks. The Yangtze Block has sporadically exposed Archean rocks in the north, Paleoproterozoic to Mesoproterozoic volcano-sedimentary sequences in the southwest and widespread Neoproterozoic sedimentary sequences accompanied by syn-sedimentary igneous rocks on the western and southeastern margins. The late Paleoproterozoic to early Mesoproterozoic Dongchuan, Dahongshan and Hekou groups in the southwestern Yangtze Block formed in a series of fault-controlled, rift-related basins associated with the fragmentation of the supercontinent Columbia. These sedimentary sequences were deposited between 1742 and 1503 Ma, and recorded continuous deposition from alluvial fan and fluvial sedimentation during the initial rifting to deep marine sedimentation in a passive margin setting. Sedimentation during initial rifting received felsic detritus mainly from adjacent continents, whereas sedimentation in a passive margin basin received detritus from felsic to intermediate rocks of the Yangtze Block. Paleoproterozoic to Mesoproterozoic rift basins in the southwestern Yangtze Block are remarkably similar to those of north Australia and northwestern Laurentia in their lower part (1742-1600 Ma), but significantly different after ca. 1600 Ma. The southwestern Yangtze Block was likely connected with the north Australia and northwestern Laurentia in Columbia but drifted away from these continents after ca. 1600 Ma. Traditionally thought Mesoproterozoic sedimentary sequences in the southeastern Yangtze Block are now confirmed to be Neoproterozoic in age and include the 835-830 Ma Sibao, Fanjingshan and Lengjiaxi groups, and 831-815 Ma Shuangqiaoshan and Xikou groups. These sequences are unconformably overlain by the ~810-730 Ma Danzhou, Xiajiang, Banxi, Heshangzheng, Luokedong and Likou groups. The regional unconformity likely marked the amalgamation between the Yangtze and Cathaysia Blocks and thus occurred at ~815-810 Ma. The lower sequences (835-815 Ma) received dominant Neoproterozoic (~980-820) felsic to intermediate materials in an active tectonic setting related to continental arc and orogenic collision, whereas the upper sequences represent sedimentation in an extensional setting with input of dominant Neoproterozoic granitic to dioritic materials (~740-900 Ma). The upper parts of the Shuangqiaoshan and Xikou groups, uncomfortably underlain by lower units, are molasse-type assemblages with additional input of pre-Neoproterozoic detritus, representing accumulation of sediments in a retro-arc foreland basin associated with the formation of the Jiangnan Orogen. Stratigraphic correlation, similarly low-δ18O and tectonic affinity of igneous rocks from different continents suggest that the Yangtze Block should be placed in the periphery of Rodinia probably adjacent to northern India. Paleoproterozoic (~2480 Ma and ~2000 Ma) and Early Neoproterozoic (711-997 Ma) were the most important periods of crustal and magmatic events of the southeastern Yangtze Block, but there is a lack of significant Grenvillian magmatism. Early Neoproterozoic magmatism highlights the contribution from both juvenile materials and pre-existing old crust, whereas ~2480 Ma and ~2000 Ma events are marked by reworking of pre-existing continental crust. Magmatism at 1600-1900 Ma was dominated by reworking of pre-existing crust, whereas the 1400-1600 Ma magmatic event recorded some addition of juvenile materials.
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Earth Sciences
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Swift, Peter Norton. "EARLY PROTEROZOIC TURBIDITE DEPOSITION AND MELANGE DEFORMATION, SOUTHEASTERN ARIZONA." Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic), The University of Arizona, 1987. http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187544.

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Greenschist-facies, Lower Proterozoic metasedimentary rocks of the Johnny Lyon Rills and Little Dragoon Mountains of southeastern Arizona were deposited prior to the intrusion of an approximately 1690 Ma rhyodacite pluton. Well-preserved primary structures indicate deposition by turbidity currents in an intermediate to neardistal setting. Sandstone compositions suggest derivation from either a complex, heterogeneous source or multiple source terranes that provided mature, quartzose sediment as well as lesser quantities of volcaniclastic detritus. Earliest deformation, predating both intrusion of the rhyodacite and metamorphism, produced sections of melange composed primarily of dismembered turbidite beds, but also incorporating large (up to several km long) blocks of deformed basalt. Subsequent deformation, in part post-dating intrusion of the rhyodacite and in part coinciding with metamorphism, affected both melange and coherent strata, and involved isoclinal folding and layerparallel faulting and shearing. It is proposed that turbidite deposition occurred in a trench associated with a north-dipping subduction zone or on ocean floor outboard of such a trench. Melange formed primarily by ductile disruption of unlithified sediments within the subduction zone. Basalt blocks incorporated within the melange represent fragments of oceanic crust or seamounts detached from the lower plate during subduction. Later deformation and intrusion of the rhyodacite occurred within an accretionary prism above the subduction zone. Deformation within the prism ended prior to intrusion of the 1625 ± 10 Ma posttectonic Johnny Lyon Granodiorite.
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Baldim, Maurício Rigoni 1983. "O domo gnáissico Alto Alegre, transição embasamento-greenstone belt do Rio Itapicuru : evolução e significado tectônico." PublishedVersion, [s.n.], 2014. http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/286596.

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Orientador: Elson Paiva de Oliveira
Dissertação (mestrado) - Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Instituto de Geociências
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Resumo: Domos gnáissicos são estruturas que podem estar associadas tanto aos orógenos extensionais quanto aos colisionais. Em orógenos colisionais, normalmente balizam os distintos terrenos dispondo-se em corredores estruturais. Na região nordeste do Cráton São Francisco, Bloco Serrinha, localiza-se o Greenstone Belt Paleoproterozoico do Rio Itapicuru, interpretado como arco continental acrecionado a um Complexo de alto grau mesoarqueano. Mapeamento geológico realizado no segmento norte da transiçao, embasamento-greenstone, revelou a ocorrência de um domo gnáissico-migmatítico que limita dois terrenos, um arqueano e outro paleoproterozoico, que destoa litoestruturalmente de outros domos reconhecidos a sul do greenstone (e.g. domos do Ambrósio, Salgadália e Pedra Alta). Além disso, dados estruturais mostram que a evolução tectônica da área ocorreu a partir de tectônica compressiva em D1 com direção E-W, seguido de transcorrência N-S em D2, possivelmente associados a transpressão. O domo, denominado Alto Alegre, possui núcleo granito-diatexítico, sendo delineado por faixas anfibolíticas concêntricas e preserva paragênese de alto grau metamórfico. Análises de elementos maiores e traços revelam que as faixas de anfibolitos do referido domo possuem características geoquímicas semelhantes aos diques máficos que cortam o embasamento, e destoam dos basaltos toleíticos do greenstone belt. Dados geocronológicos e de campo revelam idades de ca. 3080 Ma para o embasamento arqueano e para gnaisses do domo Alto Alegre, e idades de ca. 2080 Ma para o granito que intrude a porção central do domo. Os dados mostram que o domo Alto Alegre representa o embasamento arqueano retrabalhado tectonicamente e influenciado por atividade granítica, durante colisão continente-continente em ca. 2080 Ma
Abstract: Gneiss domes are structures that may be associated with both extensional and collisional orogens. In collisional orogens typically delimit distinct land forming structural corridors. In northeastern of São Francisco craton, Serrinha Block, is located the Paleoproterozoic Rio Itapicuru Greenstone Belt which is interpreted as a continental arc acrecionado to a Mesoarqueano high degree Complex. Geological mapping carried out in the northern segment of the greenstone-basement transition, revealed the occurrence of a gneissic-migmatitic dome that limits two lands, one Archean and another Paleoproterozoic. This dome is different both on litology as structuraly when comparing with other domes recognized in a south of the greenstone (e.g., domes of Ambrose, Salgadália and Pedra Alta). Furthermore, structural data show that the tectonic evolution of the area occurred from compressive tectonics E-W in D1, followed by transcurrent N-S in D2, possibly associated with transpression. The dome, called Alto Alegre, has granite-diatexítico core being outlined by concentric amphibolitic bands that preserves high metamorphic grade paragenesis. Results of major and trace elements analyzes reveal that the amphibolites bands of dome has geochemical characteristics similar to mafic dikes that cut the basement, and differ from Rio Itapicuru greenstone belt basalts. Geochronological and field data reveal ages ca. 3080 Ma for the Archean basement and the dome Alto Alegre gneisses, and ages of ca 2080 Ma for the granite that intrude the central portion of the dome. The data show that the dome Alto Alegre represents the tectonically reworked Archean basement and influenced by granite activity during continent-continent collision at ca 2080 Ma
Mestrado
Geologia e Recursos Naturais
Mestre em Geociências
8

Lane, Robert Andrew. "Geologic setting and petrology of the Proterozoic Ogilvie Mountains breccia of the Coal Creek inlier, southern Ogilvie Mountains, Yukon Territory." Thesis/Dissertation, University of British Columbia, 1990. http://hdl.handle.net/2429/29196.

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Abstract:
Ogilvie Mountains breccia (OMB) is in Early (?) to Late Proterozoic rocks of the Coal Creek Inlier, southern Ogilvie Mountains, Yukon Territory. Host rocks are the Wernecke Supergroup (Fairchild Lake, Quartet and Gillespie Lake groups) and lower Fifteenmile group. Distribution and cross-cutting relationships of the breccia were delineated by regional mapping. OMB was classified by clast type and matrix composition. Ogilvie Mountains breccia crops out discontinuously along two east-trending belts called the Northern Breccia Belt (NBB) and the Southern Breccia Belt (SBB). The NBB extends across approximately 40 km of the map area, and the SBB is about 15 km long. Individual bodies of OMB vary from dyke- and sill-like to pod-like. The breccia belts each coincide with a regional structure. The NBB coincides with a north side down reverse fault—an inferred ruptured anticline—called the Monster fault. The SBB coincides with a north side down fault called the Fifteenmile fault. These faults, at least in part, guided ascending breccia. The age of OMB is constrained by field relationships and galena lead isotope data. It is younger than the Gillespie Lake Group, and is at least as old as the lower Fifteenmile group because it intrudes both of these units. A galena lead isotope model age for the Hart River stratiform massive sulphide deposit that is in Gillespie Lake Group rocks is 1.45 Ga. Galena from veinlets cutting a dyke that cuts OMB in lower Fifteenmile group rocks is 0.90 Ga in age. Therefore the age of OMB formation is between 1.45 and 0.90 Ga. Ogilvie Mountains breccia (OMB) has been classified into monolithic (oligomictic) and heterolithic (polymictic) lithologies. These have been further divided by major matrix components—end members are carbonate-rich, hematite-rich and chlorite-rich. Monolithic breccias with carbonate matrices dominate the NBB. Heterolithic breccias are abundant locally in the NBB, but are prevalent in the SBB. Fragments were derived mainly from the Wernecke Supergroup. In the SBB fragments from the lower Fifteenmile group are present. Uncommon mafic igneous fragments were from local dykes. OMB are generally fragment dominated. Recognized fragments are up to several 10s of metres across and grade into matrix sized grains. Hydrothermal alteration has locally overprinted OMB and introduced silica, hematite and sulphide minerals. This mineralization has received limited attention from the mineral exploration industry. Rare earth element chemistry reflects a lack of mantle or deep-seated igneous process in the formation of OMB. However, this may be only an apparent lack because flooding by a large volume of sedimentary material could obscure a REE pattern indicative of another source. The genesis of OMB is significantly similar to modern mud diapirs. It is proposed that OMB originated from pressurized, underconsolidated fine grained limey sediments (Fairchild Lake Group). These were trapped below and loaded by turbidites (Quartet Group) and younger units. Tectonics and the initiation of major faults apparently triggered movement of the pressurized fluid-rich medium. The resulting bodies of breccia are sill-like and diapir-like sedimentary intrusions. Fluid-rich phases may have caused hydrofracturing (brittle failure) of the surrounding rocks (especially in the hanging wall). Breccia intrusion would have increased the width of the passage way while encorporating more fragments. Iron- and oxygen-rich hydrothermal fluids apparently were associated with the diapirism. Presumably these fluids are responsible for the high contents of hematite and iron carbonate in fragments, and especially, in the matrix of the breccias. Exhalation of these fluids may have formed the sedimentary iron formations that are spatially associated with the breccias.
Science, Faculty of
Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, Department of
Graduate
9

Stewart, Kathryn. "High temperature felsic volcanism and the role of mantle magmas in proterozoic crustal growth : the Gawler Range volcanic province /." Title page, contents and abstract only, 1992. http://web4.library.adelaide.edu.au/theses/09PH/09phs8488.pdf.

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Harris, Charles William. "A sedimentological and structural analysis of the Proterozoic Uncompahgre Group, Needle Mountains, Colorado." Diss., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 1987. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/79644.

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Abstract:
Siliciclastic sediments of the Proterozoic Uncompahgre Group can be subdivided into stratigraphic units of quartzite (Q) and pelite (P); these units include a basal, fining- and thinning-upward retrogradational sequence (Q1-P1) that records the transition from an alluvial to a shallow-marine setting. Overlying the basal sequence are three thickening- and coarsening-upward progradational sequences (P2-Q2, P3-Q3 and P4-Q4) that were influenced by tide-, storm- and wave-processes. The progradational units are subdivided into the following facies associations in a vertical sequence. Outer-to inner-shelf mudstones, Bouma sequence beds and storm beds of association A are succeeded by inner-shelf to shoreface cross-stratified sandstones of association B. Conglomerates and cross-bedded sandstones of upper association B represent alluvial braid-delta deposits. Tidal cross-bedded facies of the inner shelf/shoreface (association C) gradationally overlie association B. Interbedded within the tidal facies in upper association C are single pebble layers or <1 m-thick conglomerate beds and trough cross-bedded pebbly sandstones. Single pebble layers could be due to storm winnowing whereas conglomerates and pebbly sandstones may record shoaling to an alluvial/ shoreface setting. A temporally separated storm/alluvial and tidal shelf model best explains the origin and lateral distribution of facies in the progradational sequences. The presence of smaller progradational increments in the mudstone dominated units (P3) and the recurrence of facies associations in the thick quartzite/conglomerate units (Q2, Q3, Q4) suggests that external cyclic factors controlled sedimentation. A composite relative sea level curve integrating glacio-eustatic oscillations and long-term subsidence may account for the evolution of the thick progradational sequences of the Uncompahgre Group. Sedimentary rocks of the Uncompahgre Group have been subjected to polyphase deformation and greenschist facies metamorphism. Phase 1 structures (localized to the West Needle Mountains) include bedding-parallel deformation zones, F₁ folds and an S₁ cleavage. Phase 2 coaxial deformation resulted in the development of upright, macroscopic F₂ folds and an axial-planar crenulation cleavage, S₂. In addition basement-cover contacts were folded. Phase 3 conjugate shearing generated strike-parallel offset in stratigraphic units, a macroscopic F₃ fold, and an S₃ crenulation cleavage. In addition, oblique-slip, reverse faults were activated along basement-cover contacts. The Uncompahgre Group unconformably overlies and is inferred to be parautochthonous upon ca. 1750 Ma gneissic basement that was subjected to polyphase deformation (DB) and amphibolite facies metamorphism. Basement was intruded by ca. 1690 Ma granitoids. Deformation of gneissic and plutonic basement together with cover (DBC) postdates deposition of the Uncompahgre Group. The structural evolution of the Uncompahgre Group records the transition from a ductile, north-directed, fold-thrust belt to the formation of a basement involved “megamullion" structure which was subjected to conjugate strike-slip faulting to accommodate further shortening. DBC deformation may be analogous to the deep foreland suprastructure of an orogenic belt that developed from ca. 1690 to 1600 Ma in the southwestern U.S.A ..
Ph. D.

Books on the topic "Stratigraphic Proterozoic":

1

International Proterozoic Symposium (1981 University of Wisconsin--Madison). Proterozoic geology: Selected papers from an International Proterozoic Symposium. Boulder, Colo: Geological Society of America, 1986.

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F, Gower Charles, Rivers Toby 1948-, Ryan Arthur Bruce 1951-, and Geological Association of Canada, eds. Mid-Proterozoic Laurentia-Baltica. St. John's, Nfld., Canada: Geological Association of Canada, Dept. of Earth Sciences, 1990.

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A, Kröner, and International Geological Congress (27th : 1984 : Moscow, Russia), eds. Proterozoic lithospheric evolution. Washington, D.C: American Geophysical Union, 1987.

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A, Grambling Jeffrey, Tewksbury Barbara J, and Geological Society of America. Rocky Mountain Section., eds. Proterozoic geology of the southern Rocky Mountains. Boulder, Colo: Geological Society of America, 1989.

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Blake, D. H., fl. 1967-, ed. Geology of the Proterozoic Davenport province, central Australia. Canberra: Australian Government Publishing Service, 1987.

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A, Winchester J., ed. Later Proterozoic stratigraphy of the northern Atlantic regions. Glasgow: Blackie, 1988.

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Dawes, Peter R. The Proterozoic Thule Supergroup, Greenland and Canada: History, lithostratigraphy, and development. Copenhagen, Denmark: Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Ministry of Environment and Energy, 1997.

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Truswell, J. F. Early Proterozoic red beds on the Kaapvaal craton. Johannesburg: University of the Witwatersrand, 1990.

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Aitken, James D. Uppermost Proterozoic formations in central Mackenzie Mountains, Northwest Territories. Ottawa, Ont., Canada: Energy, Mines and Resources Canada, 1989.

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Greene, Robert C. Stratigraphy of the Late Proterozoic Murdama Group, Saudi Arabia. [Menlo Park, CA: U.S. Geological Survey], 1993.

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Book chapters on the topic "Stratigraphic Proterozoic":

1

Young, Grant M. "Earth's Earliest Extensive Glaciations: Tectonic Setting and Stratigraphic Context of Paleoproterozoic Glaciogenic Deposits." In The Extreme Proterozoic: Geology, Geochemistry, and Climate, 161–81. Washington, D. C.: American Geophysical Union, 2013. http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/146gm13.

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van Aswegen, G., D. Strydom, W. P. Colliston, H. E. Praekelt, A. E. Schoch, H. J. Blignault, B. J. V. Botha, and S. W. van der Merwe. "The structural-stratigraphic development of part of the Namaqua metamorphic complex, South Africa—An example of Proterozoic major thrust tectonics." In Proterozic Lithospheric Evolution, 207–16. Washington, D. C.: American Geophysical Union, 1987. http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/gd017p0207.

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Christie-Blick, Nicholas, and Marjorie Levy. "Stratigraphic and tectonic framework of Upper Proterozoic and Cambrian rocks in the western United States." In Late Proterozoic and Cambrian Tectonics, Sedimentation, and Record of Metazoan Radiation in the Western United States: Pocatello, Idaho, to Reno, Nevada 20–29 July, 1989, 7–21. Washington, D. C.: American Geophysical Union, 1989. http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/ft331p0007.

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Frazier, William J., and David R. Schwimmer. "The Proterozoic." In Regional Stratigraphy of North America, 39–97. Boston, MA: Springer US, 1987. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4613-1795-1_3.

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Hibbard, James. "Stratigraphy of the Fleur de Lys Belt, northwest Newfoundland." In Later Proterozoic Stratigraphy of the Northern Atlantic Regions, 200–211. Boston, MA: Springer US, 1988. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-7344-9_16.

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Winchester, J. A. "Introduction." In Later Proterozoic Stratigraphy of the Northern Atlantic Regions, 1–13. Boston, MA: Springer US, 1988. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-7344-9_1.

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Gower, C. F. "The Double Mer Formation." In Later Proterozoic Stratigraphy of the Northern Atlantic Regions, 113–18. Boston, MA: Springer US, 1988. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-7344-9_10.

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Bentley, M. "The Colonsay Group." In Later Proterozoic Stratigraphy of the Northern Atlantic Regions, 119–30. Boston, MA: Springer US, 1988. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-7344-9_11.

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Winchester, J. A., and M. D. Max. "Pre-Dalradian rocks in NW Ireland." In Later Proterozoic Stratigraphy of the Northern Atlantic Regions, 131–45. Boston, MA: Springer US, 1988. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-7344-9_12.

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Winchester, J. A., and B. W. Glover. "The Grampian Group, Scotland." In Later Proterozoic Stratigraphy of the Northern Atlantic Regions, 146–61. Boston, MA: Springer US, 1988. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-7344-9_13.

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Conference papers on the topic "Stratigraphic Proterozoic":

1

Maloof, Adam, Ryan Manzuk, Emily C. Geyman, Akshay Mehra, Jaap A. Kaandorp, Mark Webster, Stacey Edmonsond, Bolton Howes, and Cedric Hagen. "FROM MODERN ANALOGS TO THREE DIMENSIONS: LESSONS LEARNED FOR INTERPRETING THE STRATIGRAPHIC RECORD OF THE PROTEROZOIC–PHANEROZOIC TRANSITION." In GSA Connects 2022 meeting in Denver, Colorado. Geological Society of America, 2022. http://dx.doi.org/10.1130/abs/2022am-379218.

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Crombez, Vincent, Marcus Kunzmann, Claudio Delle Piane, Mohinudeen Faiz, Stuart Munday, and Anne Forbes. "STRATIGRAPHIC ARCHITECTURE OF A PROTEROZOIC SHALE PLAY: INSIGHTS FROM WELL CORRELATION IN THE VELKERRI FORMATION (BEETALOO SUB-BASIN, NORTHERN TERRITORY, AUSTRALIA)." In GSA 2020 Connects Online. Geological Society of America, 2020. http://dx.doi.org/10.1130/abs/2020am-357071.

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Gorain, S., and A. Kumar. "Seismic-Sequence Stratigraphy and Paleo-Structure Analysis of Proterozoic Sediment within Ganga Basin, India." In 82nd EAGE Annual Conference & Exhibition. European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers, 2021. http://dx.doi.org/10.3997/2214-4609.202112620.

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Babu, Rupendra, and Veeru Kant Singh. "An Evaluation of Carbonaceous Metaphytic remains from the Proterozoic Singhora Group of Chhattisgarh Supergroup, India." In Proceedings of XXIII Indian Colloquium on Micropaleontalogy and Stratigraphy and International Symposium on Global Bioevents in Earth's History. Geological Society of India, 2015. http://dx.doi.org/10.17491/cgsi/2013/63405.

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Reports on the topic "Stratigraphic Proterozoic":

1

Lane, L. S., and R. B. MacNaughton. Central Foreland NATMAP Project: Proterozoic to Devonian stratigraphic sections in British Columbia and Yukon. Natural Resources Canada/ESS/Scientific and Technical Publishing Services, 2017. http://dx.doi.org/10.4095/299863.

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Cook, F. A. Lower Paleozoic and Proterozoic stratigraphy in the Colville Hills-Tweed Lake area, Northwest Territories: implications for regional seismic stratigraphic correlations. Natural Resources Canada/ESS/Scientific and Technical Publishing Services, 1992. http://dx.doi.org/10.4095/132860.

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Lane, L. S., and R. B. MacNaughton. Introduction to stratigraphic sections from the Central Foreland NATMAP Project area: Proterozoic to Devonian successions. Natural Resources Canada/ESS/Scientific and Technical Publishing Services, 2017. http://dx.doi.org/10.4095/306301.

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Sevigny, J. H. Field and Stratigraphic Relations of Amphibolites in the Late Proterozoic Horsethief Creek Group, northern Adams River area, British Columbia. Natural Resources Canada/ESS/Scientific and Technical Publishing Services, 1987. http://dx.doi.org/10.4095/122536.

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Wilton, D. H. C., C. S. MacDougall, L. M. Mackenzie, and C. Pumphrey. Stratigraphic and metallogenic relationships along the unconformity between Archean granite basement and the early Proterozoic Moran Lake Group, central Labrador. Natural Resources Canada/ESS/Scientific and Technical Publishing Services, 1988. http://dx.doi.org/10.4095/122642.

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Aitken, J. D. Proterozoic Sedimentary Rocks [Chapter 4: Stratigraphy]. Natural Resources Canada/ESS/Scientific and Technical Publishing Services, 1993. http://dx.doi.org/10.4095/192359.

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Bingham-Koslowski, N., L. T. Dafoe, M R St-Onge, E. C. Turner, J. W. Haggart, U. Gregersen, C. E. Keen, A. L. Bent, and J. C. Harrison. Introduction and summary. Natural Resources Canada/CMSS/Information Management, 2022. http://dx.doi.org/10.4095/321823.

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Abstract:
The papers contained in this bulletin provide a comprehensive summary and updated understanding of the onshore geology and evolution of Baffin Island, the Labrador-Baffin Seaway, and surrounding onshore regions. This introductory paper summarizes and links the geological and tectonic events that took place to develop the craton and subsequent Proterozoic to Cenozoic sedimentary basins. Specifically, the Precambrian and Paleozoic geology of Baffin Island and localized occurrences underlying the adjacent Labrador-Baffin Seaway, the Mesozoic to Cenozoic stratigraphy and rift history that records the opening and evolution of the Labrador-Baffin Seaway, the seismicity of the region, as well as both the mineral (Baffin Island) and hydrocarbon (onshore and offshore) resource potential are discussed.
8

Cook, D. G., and B. C. MacLean. Subsurface Proterozoic stratigraphy and tectonics of the western plains of the Northwest Territories. Natural Resources Canada/ESS/Scientific and Technical Publishing Services, 2004. http://dx.doi.org/10.4095/215739.

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Mustard, P. S., C. F. Roots, and J. A. Donaldson. Stratigraphy of the Middle Proterozoic Gillespie Lake Group in the southern Wernecke Mountains, Yukon. Natural Resources Canada/ESS/Scientific and Technical Publishing Services, 1990. http://dx.doi.org/10.4095/131367.

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McDonough, M. R., and P. S. Simony. Stratigraphy and structure of the late Proterozoic Miette Group, northern Selwyn Range, Rocky Mountains, British Columbia. Natural Resources Canada/ESS/Scientific and Technical Publishing Services, 1988. http://dx.doi.org/10.4095/122667.

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