Academic literature on the topic 'Sugarcane mosaic virus Genetics'

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Journal articles on the topic "Sugarcane mosaic virus Genetics":

1

Viswanathan, R., M. Balamuralikrishnan, and R. Karuppaiah. "Characterization and genetic diversity of sugarcane streak mosaic virus causing mosaic in sugarcane." Virus Genes 36, no. 3 (June 2008): 553–64. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11262-008-0228-y.

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Lu, Guilong, Zhoutao Wang, Fu Xu, Yong-Bao Pan, Michael P. Grisham, and Liping Xu. "Sugarcane Mosaic Disease: Characteristics, Identification and Control." Microorganisms 9, no. 9 (September 17, 2021): 1984. http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9091984.

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Mosaic is one of the most important sugarcane diseases, caused by single or compound infection of Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV), Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV), and/or Sugarcane streak mosaic virus (SCSMV). The compound infection of mosaic has become increasingly serious in the last few years. The disease directly affects the photosynthesis and growth of sugarcane, leading to a significant decrease in cane yield and sucrose content, and thus serious economic losses. This review covers four aspects of sugarcane mosaic disease management: first, the current situation of sugarcane mosaic disease and its epidemic characteristics; second, the pathogenicity and genetic diversity of the three viruses; third, the identification methods of mosaic and its pathogen species; and fourth, the prevention and control measures for sugarcane mosaic disease and potential future research focus. The review is expected to provide scientific literature and guidance for the effective prevention and control of mosaic through resistance breeding in sugarcane.
3

Grisham, M. P., and Y. B. Pan. "A Genetic Shift in the Virus Strains that Cause Mosaic in Louisiana Sugarcane." Plant Disease 91, no. 4 (April 2007): 453–58. http://dx.doi.org/10.1094/pdis-91-4-0453.

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Leaf samples from 693 sugarcane plants showing mosaic symptoms were collected in 2001, 2002, and 2003 at 12 locations within the Louisiana sugarcane industry. Virus isolates associated with the diseased plants were identified using reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to distinguish between Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) and Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV). No SCMV strain was associated with any diseased plant collected during the survey. RT-PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis showed that SrMV strains I, H, and M were associated with 67, 10, and 2% of the plants with mosaic symptoms, respectively. In previous surveys conducted between 1978 and 1995, over 90% of the plants sampled were infected with SrMV strain H. The remaining plants mostly were infected with SrMV strain I, except for an occasional sample with SrMV strain M. RT-PCR showed that approximately 13% of the samples collected between 2001 and 2003 were infected with SrMV, but the RFLP banding pattern did not match any described strain. Twelve plants were co-infected by two SrMV strains and two plants by three SrMV strains. No RT-PCR product was produced by either the SCMV- or the SrMV-specific RT-PCR primer set for 8% of the plants showing mosaic symptoms, suggesting that another virus may cause sugarcane mosaic in Louisiana.
4

XU, Dong-Lin. "Genetic Diversity of Sorghum Mosaic Virus Infecting Sugarcane." ACTA AGRONOMICA SINICA 34, no. 11 (February 2, 2009): 1916–20. http://dx.doi.org/10.3724/sp.j.1006.2008.01916.

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Perera, M. F., M. P. Filippone, C. J. Ramallo, M. I. Cuenya, M. L. García, L. D. Ploper, and A. P. Castagnaro. "Genetic Diversity Among Viruses Associated with Sugarcane Mosaic Disease in Tucumán, Argentina." Phytopathology® 99, no. 1 (January 2009): 38–49. http://dx.doi.org/10.1094/phyto-99-1-0038.

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Sugarcane leaves with mosaic symptoms were collected in 2006–07 in Tucumán (Argentina) and analyzed by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and sequencing of a fragment of the Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) and Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV) coat protein (CP) genes. SCMV was detected in 96.6% of samples, with 41% showing the RFLP profile consistent with strain E. The remaining samples produced eight different profiles that did not match other known strains. SCMV distribution seemed to be more related to sugarcane genotype than to geographical origin, and sequence analyses of CP genes showed a greater genetic diversity compared with other studies. SrMV was detected in 63.2% of samples and most of these were also infected by SCMV, indicating that, unlike other countries and other Argentinean provinces, where high levels of co-infection are infrequent, co-existence is common in Tucumán. RFLP analysis showed the presence of SrMV strains M (68%) and I (14%), while co-infection between M and H strains was present in 18% of samples. Other SCMV subgroup members and the Sugarcane streak mosaic virus (SCSMV) were not detected. Our results also showed that sequencing is currently the only reliable method to assess SCMV and SrMV genetic diversity, because RT-PCR-RFLP may not be sufficiently discriminating.
6

Wang, Jian-Guang, Hong-Ying Zheng, Hai-Ru Chen, Michael J. Adams, and Jian-Ping Chen. "Molecular Diversities of Sugarcane mosaic virus and Sorghum mosaic virus Isolates from Yunnan Province, China." Journal of Phytopathology 158, no. 6 (November 2, 2009): 427–32. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1439-0434.2009.01642.x.

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7

Li, Yongqiang, Ruiying Liu, Tao Zhou, and Zaifeng Fan. "Genetic diversity and population structure of Sugarcane mosaic virus." Virus Research 171, no. 1 (January 2013): 242–46. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.virusres.2012.10.024.

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8

Padhi, Abinash, and Karri Ramu. "Genomic evidence of intraspecific recombination in sugarcane mosaic virus." Virus Genes 42, no. 2 (December 31, 2010): 282–85. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11262-010-0564-6.

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Dong, Meng, Guangyuan Cheng, Lei Peng, Qian Xu, Yongqing Yang, and Jingsheng Xu. "Transcriptome Analysis of Sugarcane Response to the Infection by Sugarcane Steak Mosaic Virus (SCSMV)." Tropical Plant Biology 10, no. 1 (December 15, 2016): 45–55. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12042-016-9183-2.

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10

Li, Li, Xifeng Wang, and Guanghe Zhou. "Analyses of maize embryo invasion by Sugarcane mosaic virus." Plant Science 172, no. 1 (January 2007): 131–38. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.plantsci.2006.08.006.

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Dissertations / Theses on the topic "Sugarcane mosaic virus Genetics":

1

Silva, Marcel Fernando da [UNESP]. "Resistência de genótipos de cana-de-açúcar ao Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV)." PublishedVersion, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), 2014. http://hdl.handle.net/11449/110323.

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A resistência a doenças constitui o principal fator de substituição de cultivares na cana-de-açúcar, sendo o mosaico uma das principais doenças da cultura, com registros em quase todos os países produtores. O presente estudo teve como objetivo avaliar a resistência de 79 genótipos de cana-de-açúcar, incluindo variedades e clones elite, inoculados artificialmente com o Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) Rib-1 e estimar os parâmetros genéticos associados à resistência por meio de análise de variância. Avaliações de sintomas por escala de notas foram feitas em associação com o teste serológico Plate Trapped Antibody-ELISA em um experimento conduzido em estufa e levado em condições de campo. Os genótipos IACSP982053, IACSP972028, RB855156, IACSP993009, IACSP977543, IACSP972000, IACSP962100, IACSP986202, IAC912195, IACSP953028, IAC862480, IACSP972098, IACSP955000, SP701143, IACSP952078, IACSP972020, IACSP967569, IACSP985046, SP803280, IACSP993085, IACSP972055 e IACSP977065 apresentaram-se resistentes à estirpe em estudo. A herdabilidade no sentido amplo calculada foi de 19,37% ao nível de plantas individuais e de aproximadamente 62,18% ao nível de média de parcelas, indicando uma alta influência das condições ambientais na manifestação dos sintomas de mosaico. Acessos de cana-de-açúcar pertencentes à Coleção de Germoplasma do Centro de Cana do Instituto Agronômico de Campinas também foram avaliados em um segundo experimento, com o objetivo de identificar possíveis fontes de resistência ao SCMV para serem utilizadas nos programas de introgressão genética. Foi realizada uma avaliação de sintomas de mosaico por meio de escala de notas em associação com o teste serológico PTA-ELISA em 43 acessos, ao todo, incluindo as espécies Saccharum officinarum, S. barberi, S.spontaneum e S.robustum, mantidos em campo em condições de infecção natural. Os clones ...
The resistance to diseases constitutes the main factor of cultivar replacement in sugarcane, being mosaic one of the main diseases of this crop, with records in almost all the major sugarcane growing countries. This study aimed to evaluate the resistance of 79 sugarcane genotypes, including varieties and elite clones, artificially inoculated with Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) R1b-1 and estimate genetic parameters associated to mosaic resistance by variance analysis. Evaluations of symptoms by grade scale associated with serological test Plate Trapped Antibody-ELISA were performed in a greenhouse experiment that was later taken to field conditions. The genotypes IACSP982053, IACSP972028, RB855156, IACSP993009, IACSP977543, IACSP972000, IACSP962100, IACSP986202, IAC912195, IACSP953028, IAC862480, IACSP972098, IACSP955000, SP701143, IACSP952078, IACSP972020, IACSP967569, IACSP985046, SP803280, IACSP993085, IACSP972055 and IACSP977065 were resistant to the strain in study. The broad-sense heritability at individual level and means based was 19.37% and 62.18%, respectively, which shows a great influence of environmental conditions on the expression of mosaic symptoms. Wild sugarcane germplasm were also evaluated for SCMV resistance in a second experiment, in order to identify new sources of mosaic resistance for future introgression crosses. An evaluation of symptoms by grade scale associated with serological test Plate Trapped Antibody-ELISA were performed for 43 clones, including Saccharum officinarum, S. barberi, S. spontaneum and S. robustum species, maintained under natural infection conditions. The clones IS76-155, IJ76-418 red, NG57-50, Ceram red, Badila, Sac.off. 8276, Fiji19 IJ76-313, US 57-141-5, Krakatau, IN8458, IN84-88, IN84-82, Gandacheni and Chin possibly represents resistant sources. A differential behavior among Saccharum species were also observed, with higher susceptibility in ...
2

Quint, Marcel. "Resistance gene analogues as a tool for basic and applied resistance genetics exemplified by sugarcane mosaic virus resistance in maize (Zea mays L.)." Online-Publikation, [S.l. : s.n.], 2003. http://www.bsz-bw.de/cgi-bin/xvms.cgi?SWB11051858.

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Thomas, C. M. "Cauliflower mosaic virus DNA replication." Electronic Thesis or Diss., Bucks New University, 1986. http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.374828.

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Thompson, Nicole. "Sugarcane striate mosaic associated virus : RNA sequence and genome organisation, taxonomy and detection /." Title page, contents and abstract only, 2001. http://web4.library.adelaide.edu.au/theses/09PH/09pht4744.pdf.

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Cartwirght, Ewen James. "Barley mild mosaic virus : deletions, duplication and transmission." Electronic Thesis or Diss., University of Nottingham, 1999. http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.285557.

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6

Turner, David Richard. "Protein-RNA interactions in tobacco mosaic virus assembly." Electronic Thesis or Diss., University of Cambridge, 1987. http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.328799.

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7

Silva, Marcel Fernando da. "Resistência de genótipos de cana-de-açúcar ao Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) /." Text, Jaboticabal, 2014. http://hdl.handle.net/11449/110323.

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Abstract:
Orientador: Luciana Rossini Pinto
Coorientador: Marcos Cesar Gonçalves
Banca: Sandra Helena Unêda Trevisoli
Banca: Mauro Alexandre Xavier
Resumo: A resistência a doenças constitui o principal fator de substituição de cultivares na cana-de-açúcar, sendo o mosaico uma das principais doenças da cultura, com registros em quase todos os países produtores. O presente estudo teve como objetivo avaliar a resistência de 79 genótipos de cana-de-açúcar, incluindo variedades e clones elite, inoculados artificialmente com o Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) Rib-1 e estimar os parâmetros genéticos associados à resistência por meio de análise de variância. Avaliações de sintomas por escala de notas foram feitas em associação com o teste serológico Plate Trapped Antibody-ELISA em um experimento conduzido em estufa e levado em condições de campo. Os genótipos IACSP982053, IACSP972028, RB855156, IACSP993009, IACSP977543, IACSP972000, IACSP962100, IACSP986202, IAC912195, IACSP953028, IAC862480, IACSP972098, IACSP955000, SP701143, IACSP952078, IACSP972020, IACSP967569, IACSP985046, SP803280, IACSP993085, IACSP972055 e IACSP977065 apresentaram-se resistentes à estirpe em estudo. A herdabilidade no sentido amplo calculada foi de 19,37% ao nível de plantas individuais e de aproximadamente 62,18% ao nível de média de parcelas, indicando uma alta influência das condições ambientais na manifestação dos sintomas de mosaico. Acessos de cana-de-açúcar pertencentes à Coleção de Germoplasma do Centro de Cana do Instituto Agronômico de Campinas também foram avaliados em um segundo experimento, com o objetivo de identificar possíveis fontes de resistência ao SCMV para serem utilizadas nos programas de introgressão genética. Foi realizada uma avaliação de sintomas de mosaico por meio de escala de notas em associação com o teste serológico PTA-ELISA em 43 acessos, ao todo, incluindo as espécies Saccharum officinarum, S. barberi, S.spontaneum e S.robustum, mantidos em campo em condições de infecção natural. Os clones ...
Abstract: The resistance to diseases constitutes the main factor of cultivar replacement in sugarcane, being mosaic one of the main diseases of this crop, with records in almost all the major sugarcane growing countries. This study aimed to evaluate the resistance of 79 sugarcane genotypes, including varieties and elite clones, artificially inoculated with Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) R1b-1 and estimate genetic parameters associated to mosaic resistance by variance analysis. Evaluations of symptoms by grade scale associated with serological test Plate Trapped Antibody-ELISA were performed in a greenhouse experiment that was later taken to field conditions. The genotypes IACSP982053, IACSP972028, RB855156, IACSP993009, IACSP977543, IACSP972000, IACSP962100, IACSP986202, IAC912195, IACSP953028, IAC862480, IACSP972098, IACSP955000, SP701143, IACSP952078, IACSP972020, IACSP967569, IACSP985046, SP803280, IACSP993085, IACSP972055 and IACSP977065 were resistant to the strain in study. The broad-sense heritability at individual level and means based was 19.37% and 62.18%, respectively, which shows a great influence of environmental conditions on the expression of mosaic symptoms. Wild sugarcane germplasm were also evaluated for SCMV resistance in a second experiment, in order to identify new sources of mosaic resistance for future introgression crosses. An evaluation of symptoms by grade scale associated with serological test Plate Trapped Antibody-ELISA were performed for 43 clones, including Saccharum officinarum, S. barberi, S. spontaneum and S. robustum species, maintained under natural infection conditions. The clones IS76-155, IJ76-418 red, NG57-50, Ceram red, Badila, Sac.off. 8276, Fiji19 IJ76-313, US 57-141-5, Krakatau, IN8458, IN84-88, IN84-82, Gandacheni and Chin possibly represents resistant sources. A differential behavior among Saccharum species were also observed, with higher susceptibility in ...
Mestre
8

Chen, Pengyin. "Genetics of reactions to soybean mosaic virus in soybean." Diss., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 1989. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/54781.

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The genetic interactions among 9 soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] cultivars and 6 strains of soybean mosaic virus (SMV) were investigated. The objectives were to identify genes and/or alleles conditioning resistant and necrotic reactions to SMV and to determine the genetic relationships among resistance genes from cultivars exhibiting differential responses to the SMV strains. Seven SMV-resistant (R) cultivars (‘PI 486355’, ‘Suweon 97’, ‘PI 96983’, ‘Ogden’, ‘York’, ‘Marshall’, and ‘Kwanggyo’) were crossed in all combinations among each other and with susceptible (S) cultivars ‘Essex’ and ‘Lee 68’. F₂ populations and F₂-derived F₃ lines were inoculated in field with the SMV type strain Gl and in the greenhouse with the virulent strains G4, G5, G6, G7, and G7A. All F₂ populations from R x S and necrotic (N) x S crosses having PI 96983, Ogden, York, Marshall, and Kwanggyo as either resistant or necrotic parents segregated 3R:1S and 3N:1S, respectively. F₂-derived F₃ progenies from R x S crosses exhibited an F₂ genotypic ratio of 1 homogeneous R : 2 segregating (3R:1S) : l homogeneous S. The results indicate that each of these five resistant parents has a single, dominant or partially dominant gene conditioning the resistant and necrotic reactions to SMV. No segregation for SMV reaction was evident in F₂ and F₃ generations from R x R, N x N, and S x S crosses among the five differential cultivars, indicating that the resistance genes in the five cultivars are alleles at a common locus. The alleles in PI 96983 and Ogden were previously labeled Rsy and rsyt, respectively. Gene symbols, Rsyy, Rsym, and Rsyk are proposed for the resistance genes in York, Marshall, and Kwanggyo, respectively. It is also proposed that the gene symbol rsyt be changed to Rsyt to more accurately reflect its genetic relationship to the susceptible allele. The R x S crosses with PI 486355 and Suweon 97 as resistant parents segregated 15R:1S in the F₂ and 7 (all R) : 4 (3R:1S) : 4 (15R:1S) : 1 (all S) in the F₃, indicating that each has two independent genes for resistance to SMV. The F₂ plants of PI 486355 x Suweon 97 showed no segregation for SMV reaction, suggesting that they have at least one gene in common. The crosses among all 7 resistant parents produced no susceptible segregates when inoculated with strain G1. It is concluded that the 7 resistant cultivars each have a gene or allele at the Rsy locus. Data from the experiments furnished conclusive evidence that the necrotic reaction in segregating populations is highly associated with plants that are heterozygous for the resistance gene.
Ph. D.
9

Qusus, Saba J. "Molecular Studies on Soybean Mosaic Virus-Soybean Interations." Diss., Virginia Tech, 1997. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/30328.

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In the U.S., soybean mosaic virus (SMV) is classified into seven strain groups, designated G1 to G7, based on their different responses on resistant soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] cultivars. These responses are: symptomless or resistant (R), necrotic (N), and mosaic or susceptible (S). The gene-for-gene model has been proposed for SMV-soybean interactions. In the majority of cultivars, a single dominant gene, Rsv1, confers both the R and N responses. In the first part of this study, the coat protein (CP) genes of two SMV strains, G1 and G6 were isolated, cloned, and sequenced. Gene isolation was done by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) on partially purified virus preparation without prior RNA extraction. Amplified products were blunt-end ligated into pNoTA/T7 vector and transformed into competent cells. Sequencing was performed in both directions on heat-denatured double-stranded plasmids. The predicted 265 amino acid sequence of the CP of G1 and G6 strains were 98.9% identical, with only two amino acid differences. Correlating the CP sequences of G1, G2, G6, and G7, with their virulence on resistant soybean cultivars indicated that the CP is not likely to be the R- and/or N-determinant in the SMV-soybean system. The second part of the study involved studying the pathogenesis of G1, G6, and G7 strains on inoculated leaves of R, N, and S soybean cultivars by leaf imprint immunoassay. Results indicated four types of reactions: i) susceptible, showing unrestricted replication and spread; ii) immune, where no virus was detected; iii) systemic spread, showing unrestricted replication but limited spread along the veins; and iv) restricted replication and spread, where infection was restricted to few foci along the veins. Results of this study indicated that Rsv1-mediated resistance is a multicomponent type of resistance that involves both inhibition of virus replication as well as cell-to-cell movement. The third part of the study aimed at investigating Rsv1-mediated resistance at the cellular level. For this purpose, an SMV-soybean protoplast system was developed. Protoplast isolation was based on a combined cellulase-pectolyase Y-23 digestion and metrizamide-sorbitol gradient purification protocol. Virus inoculation of protoplasts was facilitated by either polyethelene glycol (PEG) or poly-L-ornithine (PLO), and method of detection was by Western blotting using antiserum to whole virus. Inoculation by PEG was successful, but results were irreproducible because of the adverse effect of PEG on protoplast viability. Inoculation by PLO was inconclusive because of the high background from residual inoculum. Additional research is needed before a protoplast system can be used to study the mechanism of Rsv1 resistance to SMV at the cellular level.
Ph. D.
10

Holness, Claire Louise Lesley. "Isolation and characterisation of mutants of cowpea mosaic virus." Electronic Thesis or Diss., University of Warwick, 1989. http://wrap.warwick.ac.uk/59381/.

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A nitrous acid-induced, temperature sensitive mutant of cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) known as 8-14, (Evans 1985, Virology 1985, 141, 275-282), was characterised. The phenotypic defect in 8 -14 was shown not to affect translation of the RNA or the first proteolytic cleavage of the B RNA-encoded polyprotein. The defect is probably at the level of genome replication. The technique of two dimensional RNA fingerprinting showed the mutant genome to be similar to the parental wild-type but did not resolve the genetic alteration(s) specific for the mutation. The mechanism of CPMV translation was investigated by site-directed mutagenesis of a full-length cDNA clone of CPMV M RNA from which infectious RNA could be generated by in vitro transcription. The results obtained confirm the AUG at position 161 is used to direct the synthesis of the 105K protein in vitro. The detection of a 58K protein in infected protoplasts suggests that it is also used in vivo. The synthesis of the 95K protein can be initiated from either of the AUGs at positions 512 and 524. Synthesis of this protein is not essential for CPMV replication in protoplasts. Several deletion mutations were created in the M RNA cDNA clone in order to determine the regions of M RNA essential for replication of M RNA. Analysis of one mutant indicated that sequences between 1446 and 1620 are probably not required for replicase recognition. However, the accumulation of this mutant in protoplasts was reduced, presumably as a result of lack of encapsidation of the RNA as this mutant is thought not to synthesise functional coat protein. Data from several mutants showed that alterations of M RNA around nucleotides 161 and 189 prevent transcript accumulation in protoplasts possibly owing to a severe reduction in replicability of the input RNA.

Books on the topic "Sugarcane mosaic virus Genetics":

1

Weiland, John J. The roles of turnip yellow mosaic virus genes in virus replication. 1992.

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Tsai, Ching-Hsiu. Characterization of the role of the 3' noncoding region of turnip yellow mosaic virus RNA. 1993.

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Bransom, Kathryn L. Gene expression of proteins involved in replication of turnip yellow mosaic virus. 1994.

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Wallace, S. Ellen. Search for protein-protein interactions underlying the cis-preferential replication of turnip yellow mosaic virus. 1997.

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Wallace, S. Ellen. Search for protein-protein interactions underlying the cis-preferential replication of turnip yellow mosaic virus. 1997.

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Book chapters on the topic "Sugarcane mosaic virus Genetics":

1

Baker, Barbara, S. P. Dinesh-Kumar, Doil Choi, Reinhard Hehl, Catherine Corr, and Steve Whitham. "Isolation of the Tobacco Mosaic Virus Resistance Gene N." In Advances in Molecular Genetics of Plant-Microbe Interactions, 297–302. Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands, 1994. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-94-011-0177-6_43.

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Lesemann, D. E., D. D. Shukla, M. Tosic, and W. Huth. "Differentiation of the four viruses of the sugarcane mosaic virus subgroup based on cytopathology." In Potyvirus Taxonomy, 353–61. Vienna: Springer Vienna, 1992. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-7091-6920-9_38.

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Bisaro, David M., Garry Sunter, Gwen N. Revington, Clare L. Brough, Sheriar G. Hormuzdi, and Marcos Hartitz. "Molecular Genetics of Tomato Golden Mosaic Virus Replication: Progress Toward Defining Gene Functions, Transcription Units and the Origin of DNA Replication." In Viral Genes and Plant Pathogenesis, 89–105. New York, NY: Springer New York, 1990. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4612-3424-1_10.

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"Tobacco Mosaic Virus." In Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Informatics, 1979. Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands, 2008. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-6754-9_17072.

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"Alfalfa Mosaic Virus." In Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Informatics, 56. Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands, 2008. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-6754-9_469.

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"Cauliflower Mosaic Virus." In Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Informatics, 283. Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands, 2008. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-6754-9_2436.

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"Cowpea Mosaic Virus." In Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Informatics, 433. Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands, 2008. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-6754-9_3734.

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Bonneville, J. M., T. Hohn, and P. Pfeiffer. "Reverse Transcription in the Plant Virus, Cauliflower Mosaic Virus." In RNA Genetics, 23–42. CRC Press, 2018. http://dx.doi.org/10.1201/9781351076432-2.

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9

"TMV (tobacco mosaic virus)." In Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Informatics, 1973. Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands, 2008. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-6754-9_17055.

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Dreher, T. W., and T. C. Hall. "RNA Replication of Brome Mosaic Virus and Related Viruses." In RNA Genetics, 91–113. CRC Press, 2018. http://dx.doi.org/10.1201/9781351076425-5.

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Conference papers on the topic "Sugarcane mosaic virus Genetics":

1

Chandra, Mukesh, Pallavi Somvanshi, B. N. Mishra, and Amod Tiwari. "Genetics of Yellow Mosaic Virus Resistance in Mung bean." In 2010 IEEE International Conference on Computational Intelligence and Computing Research (ICCIC). IEEE, 2010. http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/iccic.2010.5705760.

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"Reactivation of VaSTS1 expression in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants by retransformation with 2b from Cucumber mosaic virus, isolate NK." In Plant Genetics, Genomics, Bioinformatics, and Biotechnology. Institute of Cytology and Genetics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 2019. http://dx.doi.org/10.18699/plantgen2019-125.

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"Reactivation of VaSTS1 expression in Arabidopsis thaliana transgenic plants by retransformation with 2b from the Cucumber Mosaic Virus isolate NK." In Current Challenges in Plant Genetics, Genomics, Bioinformatics, and Biotechnology. Institute of Cytology and Genetics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences Novosibirsk State University, 2019. http://dx.doi.org/10.18699/icg-plantgen2019-45.

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