Academic literature on the topic 'Language policy – South Africa – Eastern Cape'

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Journal articles on the topic "Language policy – South Africa – Eastern Cape":

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Spokazi, Matshikiza, Simon Luggya, and Magdaline Tanga. "The Medium of Instruction in a Multicultural Classroom: Teachers’ Perspectives in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa." International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research 20, no. 1 (January 2021): 342–55. http://dx.doi.org/10.26803/ijlter.20.1.19.

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The South African Government has instituted a policy of multicultural education (ME) to ensure inclusivity and equal learning opportunities for all learners. This paper aimed to explore teachers’ perspectives on the medium of instruction in a multicultural classroom. The paper was extracted from a thesis that examined multiculturalism in selected schools in South Africa. A sample of 18 participants was purposively selected from two urban schools that have learners from different socio-cultural backgrounds in the Eastern Cape. The paper used the interpretive paradigm, which aligns with the qualitative approach. Data were analyzed thematically. The findings revealed that as a universal language, most participants preferred using English in the classroom. However, they sometimes code-switch to IsiXhosa and/or Afrikaans (two of the 11 official languages in South Africa) if the need arises. The participants also revealed attempts at balancing the use of English with learners’ first language, mostly during breaks, sporting, and cultural events, but they admitted this does not equal ME. Finally, the participants indicated that preference to teach in English was due to its universalism. Consequently, African languages have become receptors and not creators of knowledge. The paper concludes that despite the ME policy, teachers are not keen to practice it because of a lack of skills. It is recommended that the country be zoned into language areas and teachers be taught in at least two dominant languages of each region, excluding the English language, to ensure equal educational opportunities.
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de Klerk, Vivian, and Gary P. Barkhuizen. "English in the South African Defence Force." English World-Wide 19, no. 1 (January 1998): 33–60. http://dx.doi.org/10.1075/eww.19.1.04dek.

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The article reports on research carried out at an army camp in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa in 1996; it aimed to examine language use at the camp across all levels and in all contexts, in order to assess the degree to which South Africa's new multilingual language policy of 1994 has taken root, and in particular to ascertain the extent to which English was being used, and what troops and staff felt about its use. Questionnaires, interviews and observation techniques were used to provide a full description of linguistic practices, views and attitudes at all levels and in a wide range of activities in the camp. Results suggest that despite the national language policy, and despite a very low number of L1 English speakers in the camp, English is playing a very significant role across all levels as lingua franca for efficient communication, and this is matched with a pervasively positive view about its continued use.
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Kaposhi, B. M., N. Mqoqi, and D. Schopflocher. "Evaluation of antiretroviral treatment programme monitoring in Eastern Cape, South Africa." Health Policy and Planning 30, no. 5 (June 2014): 547–54. http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/heapol/czu028.

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GOUGH, DAVID. "The English of white Eastern Cape farmers in South Africa." World Englishes 15, no. 3 (November 1996): 257–65. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-971x.1996.tb00113.x.

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Richings, G. "King's Shropshire Light Infantry Monument, Keiskammahoek, Eastern Cape, South Africa." Notes and Queries 60, no. 2 (April 2013): 305. http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/notesj/gjt089.

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Allgulander, Christer, Orlando Alonso Betancourt, David Blackbeard, Helen Clark, Franco Colin, Sarah Cooper, Robin Emsley, et al. "16th National Congress of the South African Society of Psychiatrists (SASOP)." South African Journal of Psychiatry 16, no. 3 (October 2010): 29. http://dx.doi.org/10.4102/sajpsychiatry.v16i3.273.

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<p><strong>List of abstracts and authors:</strong></p><p><strong>1. Antipsychotics in anxiety disorders</strong></p><p>Christer Allgulander</p><p><strong>2. Anxiety in somatic disorders</strong></p><p>Christer Allgulander</p><p><strong>3. Community rehabilitation of the schizophrenic patient</strong></p><p>Orlando Alonso Betancourt, Maricela Morales Herrera</p><p><strong>4. Dual diagnosis: A theory-driven multidisciplinary approach for integrative care</strong></p><p>David Blackbeard</p><p><strong>5. The emotional language of the gut - when 'psyche' meets 'soma'</strong></p><p>Helen Clark</p><p><strong>6. The Psychotherapy of bipolar disorder</strong></p><p>Franco Colin</p><p><strong>7. The Psychotherapy of bipolar disorder</strong></p><p>Franco Colin</p><p><strong>8. Developing and adopting mental health policies and plans in Africa: Lessons from South Africa, Uganda and Zambia</strong></p><p>Sara Cooper, Sharon Kleintjes, Cynthia Isaacs, Fred Kigozi, Sheila Ndyanabangi, Augustus Kapungwe, John Mayeya, Michelle Funk, Natalie Drew, Crick Lund</p><p><strong>9. The importance of relapse prevention in schizophrenia</strong></p><p>Robin Emsley</p><p><strong>10. Mental Health care act: Fact or fiction?</strong></p><p>Helmut Erlacher, M Nagdee</p><p><strong>11. Does a dedicated 72-hour observation facility in a district hospital reduce the need for involuntary admissions to a psychiatric hospital?</strong></p><p>Lennart Eriksson</p><p><strong>12. The incidence and risk factors for dementia in the Ibadan study of ageing</strong></p><p>Oye Gureje, Lola Kola, Adesola Ogunniyi, Taiwo Abiona</p><p><strong>13. Is depression a disease of inflammation?</strong></p><p><strong></strong>Angelos Halaris</p><p><strong>14. Paediatric bipolar disorder: More heat than light?</strong></p><p>Sue Hawkridge</p><p><strong>15. EBM: Anova Conundrum</strong></p><p>Elizabeth L (Hoepie) Howell</p><p><strong>16. Tracking the legal status of a cohort of inpatients on discharge from a 72-hour assessment unit</strong></p><p>Bernard Janse van Rensburg</p><p><strong>17. Dual diagnosis units in psychiatric facilities: Opportunities and challenges</strong></p><p>Yasmien Jeenah</p><p><strong>18. Alcohol-induced psychotic disorder: A comparative study on the clinical characteristics of patients with alcohol dependence and schizophrenia</strong></p><p>Gerhard Jordaan, D G Nel, R Hewlett, R Emsley</p><p><strong>19. Anxiety disorders: the first evidence for a role in preventive psychiatry</strong></p><p>Andre F Joubert</p><p><strong>20. The end of risk assessment and the beginning of start</strong></p><p>Sean Kaliski</p><p><strong>21. Psychiatric disorders abd psychosocial correlates of high HIV risk sexual behaviour in war-effected Eatern Uganda</strong></p><p>E Kinyada, H A Weiss, M Mungherera, P Onyango Mangen, E Ngabirano, R Kajungu, J Kagugube, W Muhwezi, J Muron, V Patel</p><p><strong>22. One year of Forensic Psychiatric assessment in the Northern Cape: A comparison with an established assessment service in the Eastern Cape</strong></p><p>N K Kirimi, C Visser</p><p><strong>23. Mental Health service user priorities for service delivery in South Africa</strong></p><p>Sharon Kleintjes, Crick Lund, Leslie Swartz, Alan Flisher and MHaPP Research Programme Consortium</p><p><strong>24. The nature and extent of over-the-counter and prescription drug abuse in cape town</strong></p><p>Liezl Kramer</p><p><strong>25. Physical health issues in long-term psychiatric inpatients: An audit of nursing statistics and clinical files at Weskoppies Hospital</strong></p><p>Christa Kruger</p><p><strong>26. Suicide risk in Schizophrenia - 20 Years later, a cohort study</strong></p><p>Gian Lippi, Ean Smit, Joyce Jordaan, Louw Roos</p><p><strong>27.Developing mental health information systems in South Africa: Lessons from pilot projects in Northern Cape and KwaZulu-Natal</strong></p><p>Crick Lund, S Skeen, N Mapena, C Isaacs, T Mirozev and the Mental Health and Poverty Research Programme Consortium Institution</p><p><strong>28. Mental health aspects of South African emigration</strong></p><p>Maria Marchetti-Mercer</p><p><strong>29. What services SADAG can offer your patients</strong></p><p>Elizabeth Matare</p><p><strong>30. Culture and language in psychiatry</strong></p><p>Dan Mkize</p><p><strong>31. Latest psychotic episode</strong></p><p>Povl Munk-Jorgensen</p><p><strong>32. The Forensic profile of female offenders</strong></p><p>Mo Nagdee, Helmut Fletcher</p><p><strong>33. The intra-personal emotional impact of practising psychiatry</strong></p><p>Margaret Nair</p><p><strong>34. Highly sensitive persons (HSPs) and implications for treatment</strong></p><p>Margaret Nair</p><p><strong>35. Task shifting in mental health - The Kenyan experience</strong></p><p>David M Ndetei</p><p><strong>36. Bridging the gap between traditional healers and mental health in todya's modern psychiatry</strong></p><p>David M Ndetei</p><p><strong>37. Integrating to achieve modern psychiatry</strong></p><p>David M Ndetei</p><p><strong>38. Non-medical prescribing: Outcomes from a pharmacist-led post-traumatic stress disorder clinic</strong></p><p>A Parkinson</p><p><strong>39. Is there a causal relationship between alcohol and HIV? Implications for policy, practice and future research</strong></p><p>Charles Parry</p><p><strong>40. Global mental health - A new global health discipline comes of age</strong></p><p>Vikram Patel</p><p><strong>41. Integrating mental health into primary health care: Lessons from pilot District demonstration sites in Uganda and South Africa</strong></p><p>Inge Petersen, Arvin Bhana, K Baillie and MhaPP Research Programme Consortium</p><p><strong>42. Personality disorders -The orphan child in axis I - Axis II Dichotomy</strong></p><p><strong></strong>Willie Pienaar</p><p><strong>43. Case Studies in Psychiatric Ethics</strong></p><p>Willie Pienaar</p><p><strong>44. Coronary artery disease and depression: Insights into pathogenesis and clinical implications</strong></p><p>Janus Pretorius</p><p><strong>45. Impact of the Mental Health Care Act No. 17 of 2002 on designated hospitals in KwaZulu-Natal: Triumphs and trials</strong></p><p>Suvira Ramlall, Jennifer Chipps</p><p><strong>46. Biological basis of addication</strong></p><p>Solomon Rataemane</p><p><strong>47. Genetics of Schizophrenia</strong></p><p>Louw Roos</p><p><strong>48. Management of delirium - Recent advances</strong></p><p>Shaquir Salduker</p><p><strong>49. Social neuroscience: Brain research on social issues</strong></p><p>Manfred Spitzer</p><p><strong>50. Experiments on the unconscious</strong></p><p>Manfred Spitzer</p><p><strong>51. The Psychology and neuroscience of music</strong></p><p>Manfred Spitzer</p><p><strong>52. Mental disorders in DSM-V</strong></p><p>Dan Stein</p><p><strong>53. Personality, trauma exposure, PTSD and depression in a cohort of SA Metro policemen: A longitudinal study</strong></p><p>Ugashvaree Subramaney</p><p><strong>54. Eating disorders: An African perspective</strong></p><p>Christopher Szabo</p><p><strong>55. An evaluation of the WHO African Regional strategy for mental health 2001-2010</strong></p><p>Thandi van Heyningen, M Majavu, C Lund</p><p><strong>56. A unitary model for the motor origin of bipolar mood disorders and schizophrenia</strong></p><p>Jacques J M van Hoof</p><p><strong>57. The origin of mentalisation and the treatment of personality disorders</strong></p><p>Jacques J M Hoof</p><p><strong>58. How to account practically for 'The Cause' in psychiatric diagnostic classification</strong></p><p>C W (Werdie) van Staden</p><p><strong>POSTER PRESENTATIONS</strong></p><p><strong>59. Problem drinking and physical and sexual abuse at WSU Faculty of Health Sciences, Mthatha, 2009</strong></p><p>Orlando Alonso Betancourt, Maricela Morales Herrera, E, N Kwizera, J L Bernal Munoz</p><p><strong>60. Prevalence of alcohol drinking problems and other substances at WSU Faculty of Health Sciences, Mthatha, 2009</strong></p><p>Orlando Alonso Betancourt, Maricela Morales Herrera, E, N Kwizera, J L Bernal Munoz</p><p><strong>61. Lessons learnt from a modified assertive community-based treatment programme in a developing country</strong></p><p>Ulla Botha, Liezl Koen, John Joska, Linda Hering, Piet Ooosthuizen</p><p><strong>62. Perceptions of psychologists regarding the use of religion and spirituality in therapy</strong></p><p>Ottilia Brown, Diane Elkonin</p><p><strong>63. Resilience in families where a member is living with schizophreni</strong></p><p>Ottilia Brown, Jason Haddad, Greg Howcroft</p><p><strong>64. Fusion and grandiosity - The mastersonian approach to the narcissistic disorder of the self</strong></p><p>William Griffiths, D Macklin, Loray Daws</p><p><strong>65. Not being allowed to exist - The mastersonian approach to the Schizoid disorder of the self</strong></p><p>William Griffiths, D Macklin, Loray Daws</p><p><strong>66. Risky drug-injecting behaviours in Cape Town and the need for a needle exchange programme</strong></p><p>Volker Hitzeroth</p><p><strong>67. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome in adolescents in the Western Cape: A case series</strong></p><p>Terri Henderson</p><p><strong>68. Experience and view of local academic psychiatrists on the role of spirituality in South African specialist psychiatry, compared with a qualitative analysis of the medical literature</strong></p><p>Bernard Janse van Rensburg</p><p><strong>69. The role of defined spirituality in local specialist psychiatric practice and training: A model and operational guidelines for South African clinical care scenarios</strong></p><p>Bernard Janse van Rensburg</p><p><strong>70. Handedness in schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder in an Afrikaner founder population</strong></p><p>Marinda Joubert, J L Roos, J Jordaan</p><p><strong>71. A role for structural equation modelling in subtyping schizophrenia in an African population</strong></p><p>Liezl Koen, Dana Niehaus, Esme Jordaan, Robin Emsley</p><p><strong>72. Caregivers of disabled elderly persons in Nigeria</strong></p><p>Lola Kola, Oye Gureje, Adesola Ogunniyi, Dapo Olley</p><p><strong>73. HIV Seropositivity in recently admitted and long-term psychiatric inpatients: Prevalence and diagnostic profile</strong></p><p>Christina Kruger, M P Henning, L Fletcher</p><p><strong>74. Syphilis seropisitivity in recently admitted longterm psychiatry inpatients: Prevalence and diagnostic profile</strong></p><p>Christina Kruger, M P Henning, L Fletcher</p><p><strong>75. 'The Great Suppression'</strong></p><p>Sarah Lamont, Joel Shapiro, Thandi Groves, Lindsey Bowes</p><p><strong>76. Not being allowed to grow up - The Mastersonian approach to the borderline personality</strong></p><p>Daleen Macklin, W Griffiths</p><p><strong>77. Exploring the internal confirguration of the cycloid personality: A Rorschach comprehensive system study</strong></p><p>Daleen Macklin, Loray Daws, M Aronstam</p><p><strong>78. A survey to determine the level of HIV related knowledge among adult psychiatric patients admitted to Weskoppies Hospital</strong></p><p><strong></strong> T G Magagula, M M Mamabolo, C Kruger, L Fletcher</p><p><strong>79. A survey of risk behaviour for contracting HIV among adult psychiatric patients admitted to Weskoppies Hospital</strong></p><p>M M Mamabolo, T G Magagula, C Kruger, L Fletcher</p><p><strong>80. A retrospective review of state sector outpatients (Tara Hospital) prescribed Olanzapine: Adherence to metabolic and cardiovascular screening and monitoring guidelines</strong></p><p>Carina Marsay, C P Szabo</p><p><strong>81. Reported rapes at a hospital rape centre: Demographic and clinical profiles</strong></p><p>Lindi Martin, Kees Lammers, Donavan Andrews, Soraya Seedat</p><p><strong>82. Exit examination in Final-Year medical students: Measurement validity of oral examinations in psychiatry</strong></p><p>Mpogisheng Mashile, D J H Niehaus, L Koen, E Jordaan</p><p><strong>83. Trends of suicide in the Transkei region of South Africa</strong></p><p>Banwari Meel</p><p><strong>84. Functional neuro-imaging in survivors of torture</strong></p><p>Thriya Ramasar, U Subramaney, M D T H W Vangu, N S Perumal</p><p><strong>85. Newly diagnosed HIV+ in South Africa: Do men and women enroll in care?</strong></p><p>Dinesh Singh, S Hoffman, E A Kelvin, K Blanchard, N Lince, J E Mantell, G Ramjee, T M Exner</p><p><strong>86. Diagnostic utitlity of the International HIC Dementia scale for Asymptomatic HIV-Associated neurocognitive impairment and HIV-Associated neurocognitive disorder in South Africa</strong></p><p>Dinesh Singh, K Goodkin, D J Hardy, E Lopez, G Morales</p><p><strong>87. The Psychological sequelae of first trimester termination of pregnancy (TOP): The impact of resilience</strong></p><p>Ugashvaree Subramaney</p><p><strong>88. Drugs and other therapies under investigation for PTSD: An international database</strong></p><p>Sharain Suliman, Soraya Seedat</p><p><strong>89. Frequency and correlates of HIV Testing in patients with severe mental illness</strong></p><p>Hendrik Temmingh, Leanne Parasram, John Joska, Tania Timmermans, Pete Milligan, Helen van der Plas, Henk Temmingh</p><p><strong>90. A proposed mental health service and personnel organogram for the Elizabeth Donkin psychiatric Hospital</strong></p><p>Stephan van Wyk, Zukiswa Zingela</p><p><strong>91. A brief report on the current state of mental health care services in the Eastern Cape</strong></p><p>Stephan van Wyk, Zukiswa Zingela, Kiran Sukeri, Heloise Uys, Mo Nagdee, Maricela Morales, Helmut Erlacher, Orlando Alonso</p><p><strong>92. An integrated mental health care service model for the Nelson Mandela Bay Metro</strong></p><p>Stephan van Wyk, Zukiswa Zingela, Kiran Sukeri</p><p><strong>93. Traditional and alternative healers: Prevalence of use in psychiatric patients</strong></p><p>Zukiswa Zingela, S van Wyk, W Esterhuysen, E Carr, L Gaauche</p>
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Davenport, N. A., and J. Gambiza. "Municipal commonage policy and livestock owners: Findings from the Eastern Cape, South Africa." Land Use Policy 26, no. 3 (July 2009): 513–20. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.landusepol.2008.07.007.

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Rasana, Nomakhosazana Hazel. "The reading preferences of Grade 11 ESL learners in the Eastern Cape, South Africa." Southern African Linguistics and Applied Language Studies 24, no. 2 (June 2006): 175–90. http://dx.doi.org/10.2989/16073610609486416.

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van de Water, B. J., T. N. Meyer, M. Wilson, C. Young, B. Gaunt, and K. W. le Roux. "TB prevention cascade at a district hospital in rural Eastern Cape, South Africa." Public Health Action 11, no. 2 (June 2021): 97–100. http://dx.doi.org/10.5588/pha.20.0055.

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SETTING: Rural Eastern Cape, South Africa.OBJECTIVE: To identify steps in the TB preventive care cascade from routinely collected data among TB patients at a district hospital prior to the implementation of a novel TB program.DESIGN: This was a retrospective study. We adapted the TB prevention cascade to measure indicators routinely collected at district hospitals for TB using a cascade framework to evaluate outcomes in the cohort of close contacts.RESULTS: A total of 1,722 charts of TB patients were reviewed. The majority of patients (87%) were newly diagnosed with no previous episodes of TB. A total of 1,548 (90%) patients identified at least one close contact. A total of 7,548 contacts were identified with a median of 4.9 (range 1–16) contacts per patient. Among all contacts identified, 2,913 (39%) were screened for TB. Only 15 (0.5%) started TB preventive therapy and 122 (4.4%) started TB treatment. Nearly 25% of all medical history and clinical information was left unanswered among the 1,722 TB charts reviewed.CONCLUSION: Few close contacts were screened or started on TB preventive therapy in this cohort. Primary care providers for TB care in district health facilities should be informed of best practices for screening and treating TB infection and disease.
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Cheteni, Priviledge. "Smallholder farmers’ awareness of biofuel crops in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa." Environmental Economics 7, no. 3 (October 2016): 75–80. http://dx.doi.org/10.21511/ee.07(3).2016.09.

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In this study, 157 smallholder farmers from the OR Tambo and Chris Hani district municipality in South Africa were purposively sampled to participate in a survey. The objective was to identify the factors that influence smallholder farmers’ awareness of biofuel crops. Using a binary logistic model, it was found that the variables: gender, household income, membership in association, land utilization and qualification were statistically significant in influencing farmers’ awareness of biofuel crops. Therefore, it is recommended that the South African government should identify the smallholder farmers targeted for the biofuel program by their social status, as pointed in this study. Keywords: awareness, binary model, biofuel industrial policy, energy, shared growth initiative, smallholder farmers. JEL Classification: Q1, Q2, Q4, Q5

Dissertations / Theses on the topic "Language policy – South Africa – Eastern Cape":

1

Made, Zoliswa Jacqueline. "An investigation into implementation of language policy in the Eastern Cape with specific reference to isiXhosa." Thesis, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, 2010. http://hdl.handle.net/10948/1181.

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This study is about An Investigation into Implementation of Language Policy in the Eastern Cape with specific reference to isiXhosa. The objectives of this study are to investigate the current state of language policy implementation plan in local government sectors and schools and to propose a strategy for a sustainable language implementation plan for indigenous languages of South Africa. Chapter 1 provides the background, definitions of terms, the statement of the problem, the research methods used and the literature reviewed. Chapter 2 deals with the critical analysis of language policy, looking at the types of language policies and various relevant language policies. Chapter 3 addresses challenges facing the indigenous languages of South Africa (with specific reference to isiXhosa) especially at provincial level. Chapter 4 discusses the implementation strategies which will help in the development of the indigenous languages. Chapter 5 concludes the study by presenting findings and recommendations for future research.
2

Nakin, Rosalia Moroesi. "An examination of language planning and policy in the Eastern Cape with specific reference to Sesotho : a sociolinguistic study." Thesis, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, 2009. http://hdl.handle.net/10948/1020.

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This sociolinguistic study examines issues of corpus, status and acquisition in Language Planning in Sesotho and isiXhosa in the Eastern Cape. Language plays an important role in the lives of its speakers in society as they interact. Chapter 1 of this study provides the background, definitions of terms used, the objective of the study, the statement of the problem, the research methods used and the literature reviewed. Chapter 2 addresses the context, orientations, stages, and frameworks or types of language planning. Corpus planning forms an integral part of this study. This chapter also looks at different ways of developing terminology. Lastly, the chapter discusses the relationship between corpus planning and purism. Chapter 3 provides the other two types or frameworks of language planning namely, status and acquisition planning. Goals of language planning, and variables for language planning are also discussed in chapter 3. Chapter 4 looks at principles of language planning. Chapter 5 deals with the Language-in-Education Policy, the Eastern Cape Provincial Language Policy Framework, language attitudes and responses to language planning and language policy. Chapter 6 presents the findings and challenges facing the development and use of African languages one of which is Sesotho, as prescribed in the Constitution of the country. A few suggestions and different approaches towards language awareness campaigns are presented in this chapter. Lastly, this chapter concludes the study.
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Rani, Nomakhosazana Jeanette. "The place of language policy in education in teaching and learning: a case study of two primary schools in the Eastern Cape Province." Thesis, University of Fort Hare, 2016. http://hdl.handle.net/10353/2381.

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This study investigates the implementation of Language in Education Policy (LiEP) in learning and teaching in grades six from two schools. It critically examines the teachers’ practices and experiences towards English as the language of learning and teaching (LoLT) at two different primary schools from the eMalahleni in the Lady Frere Education District in the Eastern Cape. The study is guided by the fact that most learners use their mother tongue (isiXhosa) in classroom as well as outside classroom contexts. Furthermore, some teachers use the translation method of teaching language as they code-switch to their home language when teaching content subjects as well as English. Despite this practice in class, learners are expected to answer their test and examination questions in English. Theoretically, this study is underpinned by the constructivist view of language learning (Gaserfeld, 2003) and English as an international language (Sivasubramaniam, 2011). On the basis of the ecological and the constructivist approaches to language learning, Sivasubramaniam (2011 p.53) views language as a creative instrument of meaning which ‘has the power to create meaning anew and afresh’ each time that someone uses it. The study makes use of the qualitative research method with a case study design that is placed within the interpretive paradigm. The data collected will be analysed through the use of critical discourse analysis. The findings from the study suggest some instrumental motivations to use English as LOLT which is informed by Language policy. Some of these motivations are: studying abroad, business with foreign investors and integrative motivations as the learner will be able to communicate with people from different countries. The study concludes that there is need for schools to stick to the English medium because this acts as an open door to the upward economic mobility among the previously disadvantaged. Based on this, it can be recommended that schools stick to English first additional language as their language of teaching and learning.
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Mpahlwa, Matthew Xola. "Language policy and practice in Eastern Cape courtrooms with reference to interpretation in selected cases." Thesis, Rhodes University, 2015. http://hdl.handle.net/10962/d1018658.

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This study seeks to find what problems and process of interpreting are experienced by professional interpreters in the criminal justice system in South Africa. This study commences with an outlook of the origins and development of types of interpretation and then proceeds with critical review of scholarly literature dealing with interpretation in multilingual courtroom. This study explores the flawed language policy and its impracticality for the Eastern Cape courtrooms. This study undertakes a critical analysis of the current legislation (Bills & Acts).This study explores the extent to which the court automatic review proceedings act as a gatekeeper in ensuring against prejudice that can result in the non-use and use of indigenous languages in the trial courtroom within the Eastern Cape jurisdiction. Furthermore this study focuses on cases taken for review based on mis-understanding, mis-communication and wrongful interpretation that result in irregularities that appear on court records. This study also investigates the primary barriers for the use of African languages as languages of record in the courtroom. An eclectic sociolinguistic approach which encompasses the ethnography of speaking, and discourse analysis (observation in the courtroom) is used as a methodology in this study. Furthermore, the analysis of case-law forms part of the methodology alongside court observation.This study saw court actors from different spheres of the legal profession give their personal views and encounters with regards the art and the state of court interpreting in the province of the Eastern Cape.This state of affairs may have disastrous and far-reaching effects in that incorrect and/or imperfect translation may relate to the very facts that are crucial for the determination of the case. At the end recommendations are given on how to remedy the current state of affairs.
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Kenyon, Tracy Karen. "An investigation into school learners' perceptions of linguistic politeness norms within and across cultures." Thesis, Rhodes University, 2004. http://hdl.handle.net/10962/d1004715.

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The assumption underlying this study is that cultures differ in terms of politeness norms. Often people from different cultures approach one another in what they think is an appropriate manner and the outcome is miscommunication. This may be attributed to differing cultural norms and this study aims to examine what a sample of school learners perceive to be polite behaviour when making requests and their reasons for doing so. This study focuses on perceived politeness norms (Brown and Levinson 1978) in English across selected South African cultures. The individuals are seen as reflecting a cultural identity, using norms that they feel are appropriate in given situations. Previous researchers have endeavoured to show that politeness norms are universal, but it has emerged that this is not always the case. When people from differing language and cultural backgrounds come into contact they have to find a common ground for their interaction to be successful (Lustig and Koester 1999). Of particular interest is the way people request things, both the way they phrase their request and their reasons for phrasing it this way. In order to investigate this, twenty-nine same-sex pairs of Grade 10 learners were selected from three schools with different cultural backgrounds in Grahamstown. These learners were required to complete a Discourse Completion Test, which contained both Think-Aloud and Retrospection Procedures, while they were being audio-taped. This data was transcribed and analysed using a model that was developed and adapted to describe request strategies. This data is shown through the use of basic statistics, even though it is primarily qualitative. The data is given this qualitative dimension by looking at the factors that the co-conversants attend to. The recorded data shows that although second language speakers of English have a formula for requesting things, they are not always able to articulate why they use the request strategies they do. It appears that English first language speakers and speakers who have English as an additional language request things similarly, but the first language speakers have access to a greater variety of politeness strategies. They also attend to different contextual features. This shows that while the need to be polite seems to be universal, the expectations of the speakers will be different and while a first language speaker of English would not misinterpret the force of a given speech act, they may feel that the person who has English as an additional language is rude. Sensitivity is therefore called for in order to combat mutual negative stereotyping and misunderstandings.
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Leander, Elizabeth Alice. "A case study of the multiple contextual factors that impact on the reading competencies of grade 3 non-mother tongue speakers of English in a Grahamstown Primary School in the Eastern Cape, South Africa." Thesis, Rhodes University, 2007. http://hdl.handle.net/10962/d1005913.

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This study explores what happens in a reading class where grade 3 learners from specific cultural and ethnic backgrounds are taught to read in a language other than their mother-tongue. The research takes place at a primary school in the Eastern Cape, South Africa where English is the Medium of Instruction (MOI).The report on the findings of this research reveals that the teaching strategies and reading theories of the teacher, the literacy backgrounds of the learners, as well as the language preferences of the parents, are some of the contextual factors that impact on reading. One of the major findings in the study constitutes the debilitating effects of the learners' socio- economic circumstances on their reading performances in the classroom. The socio-political factors that impact on the learners, the teacher, and the school as a social unit, proved to be the factors that are remnants of the Apartheid segregation polices as well as the educational policies of the present government, especially, those pertaining to mother-tongue Instruction. Although it is difficult to generalize from a small-scale study like this, its benefits lie in the evidence that confirms the influence of specific contextual factors on reading proficiencies, the evidence that identifies poor and effective teaching practices and the evidence that elucidate the implications of non-mother tongue instruction. This research may thus serve to raise the consciousness of practitioners in reading instruction, parents and policy makers.
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Besman, Shirley. "Educators' experiences with the implementation of Grade 11 NCS English first additional language in selected schools in the Fort Beaufort Education District." Thesis, University of Fort Hare, 2012. http://hdl.handle.net/10353/d1006251.

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One of the essential sectors that needed a drastic change in the post apartheid era in South Africa, was the education system or policy of the country. The government had a responsibility of combining together the nineteen different Departments of Education into which the schools were fragmented. It is in the interest of the country that, out of the eleven official languages of the country, learners should at least be fluent in two languages namely, the learner‟s mother language and any official language which will be treated as an additional language, thus, promoting additive bilingualism. This is on line with the country‟s constitution which has granted equal status to the eleven languages. That resulted in the formulation of two very imperative policies pertaining to schools; 1) The South African Schools Act (SASA) of 1996 which repeal all discriminatory policies of apartheid. On the issue of language the SASA placed the responsibility of choosing the school subjects to the School Governing Bodies (SGB) and 2) The Language-in- Education Policy (LiEP) of 1997 which is based on the recognition that South Africa is multilingual, and promotes learning of more than one official language. In an attempt to accomplish the constitutional obligation, and establish uniformity or equality in education, Curriculum 2005 which was later revised and known as the Revised National Statement and later revised and known as the NATIONAL Curriculum Statement, with the Outcomes Based Education as its approach, was introduced. The study investigated the experiences of educators with the implementation of NCS EFAL in Grade 11 in the Fort Beaufort Education District. English First Additional Language is used by the majority of schools as the Language of Learning and Teaching (LoLT). The study is located in the interpretive paradigm which sought to explore people‟s experiences and their views. Qualitative research approach was adopted in the study with the intentions of finding as much detail as possible on the experiences of educators with the implementation of NCS EFAL in the Grade 11 classrooms. Six EFAL educators in the Fort Beaufort Education District in the Nkonkobe Municipality were purposely selected for the study. Semi structured interviews consisting of precisely defined questions that were pre-prepared, yet at the same time permitted the EFAL educators to answer beyond what the researcher enquired, were also employed in the study. The results pointed out that all EFAL educators interviewed were qualified teachers and had specialized in English teaching. In addition, the study revealed that in the Fort Beaufort Education District, there were two categories of EFAL educators who were trained for the implementation of NCS EFAL; those who only received one week departmental workshop and those who on top of the one week departmental workshop, received a two year training in Advanced Certificate In Education (ACE) English Language Teaching (ELT) from a Higher Education. The dissimilarity between the two groups manifested in their respective schools between the educators and their Heads of Departments (HOD) who happen to have little knowledge of the implementation of the curriculum. It became evident that the group of educators who were trained in ACE ELT were more familiar with the requirements of the NCS EFAL. The other group which was not conversant with the NCS EFAL policies decided to maintain their old teaching methods. Key recommendations of the study: Policy makers should clarify terminology to be understood by all educators, the Department of Education should take full responsibility of retraining educators to ensure uniformity in training through the in-service trainings yearly.
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Maqam, Eslinah Zodwa. "The experiences of isiMpondo speakers in learning standard isiXhosa through the formal education system : an exploratory study at a school in the Bizana district of the Eastern Cape." Thesis, Rhodes University, 2015. http://hdl.handle.net/10962/d1017893.

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This study investigates the experiences of isiMpondo speakers in learning standard language through the formal education system. The sociolinguistic factors such as attitudes, language policies and language use in multilingual societies are taken into considerations. The children of non-standard language speakers such as those who speak dialects like isiMpondo have to use another language in their early years in the school system. It is articulated that the isiMpondo that the child brings to the school from the environment is not accommodated simply because it is a non-standard language; whereas the language that is used in the classroom situation is the isiXhosa variety which is a standard one. The research findings show that isiMpondo impacts on learner’s education directly because they lose marks during the course of the year and during examination times if they use it. The study concludes with a recommendation that educators should honour the seven roles of educators by appropriate norms and standards. Some approaches to teaching have been suggested to be used by teachers with regard to inclusivity, as it recognises diversity, and values the following: the uniqueness of the individuals, the experiences, abilities, cultural and language backgrounds of each individual. All in all it seeks to meet the needs of the individual learner by creating a non-discriminatory teaching and learning environment.
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Mbude-Shale, Beryl Ntombizanele. "Exploring the correlation between language medium and academic achievement: a comparative study of the language of learning and teaching (LoLT) and mathematics results in the 2010 Grade 12 National Senior Certificate examinations in the Eastern Cape." Thesis, Rhodes University, 2013. http://hdl.handle.net/10962/d1001863.

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In 2009, of the 68,129 learners who wrote Matric, only 34,731 learners passed. In 2010, there was an increase in the provincial pass rate causing much excitement across the board. The reality was that of the 64,090 learners who wrote, only 37,345 learners passed. In 2010, a result below 50% was recorded for Mathematics and Physical Science nationally (DBE; 2011). Despite efforts by the Education Department to support MSTE; establishing Mathematics and Science schools, NGOs and HEIs giving extra Mathematics and Science support to students and teachers, the offering of Saturday classes and incubation camps, we still get minimal return on investment. This thesis analyses these results against the backdrop of language planning theory, particularly language-in-education policies, pre and post-apartheid. The correlation between language medium and academic performance in language (LoLT) and Mathematics of Grade 12 learners is explored. Worldwide the issue of low achievement in Mathematics by ESL students is of great concern (Cuevas, 1984). The 2004 Systemic Evaluation sample of learners was in Grade 6 then; in 2010 they wrote Grade 12. The purpose of the systemic evaluation was to provide an insight into the levels of learner performance in Maths, Natural Science and LoLT in Grade 6 (IPSER, 2006). A major finding of the IPSER was that language was an important factor related to learner achievement. A major disparity was observed in this research, that although the Eastern Cape performed below the national average in the three subjects evaluated, the learners for whom LoLT was the same as their home language obtained scores that were significantly higher than those whose home language was different from the LoLT. The provincial average for Mathematics was 23.40% compared to the national average of 27.80%. For LoLT the province scored 30.16 against the national score of 38.03%. Of interest in this study is a juxtaposition of the Matric results of this same group of learners in 2010 and see whether issues that came up then are still significant in mitigating achievement in Mathematics and Language (LoLT). Some research studies have been conducted in South Africa (Adler, 1998; Setati, 1996-2002; Moloi, 2006) identifying the vital role language plays in learning Mathematics, especially for English L2 learners. Building on research and findings of academics such as the late Alexander, Ramani, Joseph, Hendricks, Heugh, Dalvit, Webb and Murray, this thesis suggests that a mother-tongue-based-bilingual approach to education should be adopted as a matter of urgency
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Dalvit, Lorenzo. "Attitudes of isiXhosa-speaking students at the University of Fort Hare towards the use of isiXhosa as a language of learning and teaching (LOLT)." Thesis, Rhodes University, 2004. http://eprints.ru.ac.za/16/.

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Books on the topic "Language policy – South Africa – Eastern Cape":

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Potgieter, Cheryl. Women, development & transport in rural Eastern Cape, South Africa. Cape Town, South Africa: HSRC press, 2006.

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Reynolds, John. Development Planning in South Africa: Policy Challenge in the Eastern Cape. Zed Books, Limited, 2018.

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Reynolds, John. Development Planning in South Africa: Provincial Policy and State Power in the Eastern Cape. Zed Books, Limited, 2019.

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Potgieter, Cheryl-Ann, Renay Pillay, and Sharmla Rama. Women, Development and Transport in Rural Eastern Cape, South Africa (Hsrc Research Monograph). Human Sciences Research Council, 2007.

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Johansen, Bruce, and Adebowale Akande, eds. Nationalism: Past as Prologue. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2021. http://dx.doi.org/10.52305/aief3847.

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Nationalism: Past as Prologue began as a single volume being compiled by Ad Akande, a scholar from South Africa, who proposed it to me as co-author about two years ago. The original idea was to examine how the damaging roots of nationalism have been corroding political systems around the world, and creating dangerous obstacles for necessary international cooperation. Since I (Bruce E. Johansen) has written profusely about climate change (global warming, a.k.a. infrared forcing), I suggested a concerted effort in that direction. This is a worldwide existential threat that affects every living thing on Earth. It often compounds upon itself, so delays in reducing emissions of fossil fuels are shortening the amount of time remaining to eliminate the use of fossil fuels to preserve a livable planet. Nationalism often impedes solutions to this problem (among many others), as nations place their singular needs above the common good. Our initial proposal got around, and abstracts on many subjects arrived. Within a few weeks, we had enough good material for a 100,000-word book. The book then fattened to two moderate volumes and then to four two very hefty tomes. We tried several different titles as good submissions swelled. We also discovered that our best contributors were experts in their fields, which ranged the world. We settled on three stand-alone books:” 1/ nationalism and racial justice. Our first volume grew as the growth of Black Lives Matter following the brutal killing of George Floyd ignited protests over police brutality and other issues during 2020, following the police assassination of Floyd in Minneapolis. It is estimated that more people took part in protests of police brutality during the summer of 2020 than any other series of marches in United States history. This includes upheavals during the 1960s over racial issues and against the war in Southeast Asia (notably Vietnam). We choose a volume on racism because it is one of nationalism’s main motive forces. This volume provides a worldwide array of work on nationalism’s growth in various countries, usually by authors residing in them, or in the United States with ethnic ties to the nation being examined, often recent immigrants to the United States from them. Our roster of contributors comprises a small United Nations of insightful, well-written research and commentary from Indonesia, New Zealand, Australia, China, India, South Africa, France, Portugal, Estonia, Hungary, Russia, Poland, Kazakhstan, Georgia, and the United States. Volume 2 (this one) describes and analyzes nationalism, by country, around the world, except for the United States; and 3/material directly related to President Donald Trump, and the United States. The first volume is under consideration at the Texas A & M University Press. The other two are under contract to Nova Science Publishers (which includes social sciences). These three volumes may be used individually or as a set. Environmental material is taken up in appropriate places in each of the three books. * * * * * What became the United States of America has been strongly nationalist since the English of present-day Massachusetts and Jamestown first hit North America’s eastern shores. The country propelled itself across North America with the self-serving ideology of “manifest destiny” for four centuries before Donald Trump came along. Anyone who believes that a Trumpian affection for deportation of “illegals” is a new thing ought to take a look at immigration and deportation statistics in Adam Goodman’s The Deportation Machine: America’s Long History of Deporting Immigrants (Princeton University Press, 2020). Between 1920 and 2018, the United States deported 56.3 million people, compared with 51.7 million who were granted legal immigration status during the same dates. Nearly nine of ten deportees were Mexican (Nolan, 2020, 83). This kind of nationalism, has become an assassin of democracy as well as an impediment to solving global problems. Paul Krugman wrote in the New York Times (2019:A-25): that “In their 2018 book, How Democracies Die, the political scientists Steven Levitsky and Daniel Ziblatt documented how this process has played out in many countries, from Vladimir Putin’s Russia, to Recep Erdogan’s Turkey, to Viktor Orban’s Hungary. Add to these India’s Narendra Modi, China’s Xi Jinping, and the United States’ Donald Trump, among others. Bit by bit, the guardrails of democracy have been torn down, as institutions meant to serve the public became tools of ruling parties and self-serving ideologies, weaponized to punish and intimidate opposition parties’ opponents. On paper, these countries are still democracies; in practice, they have become one-party regimes….And it’s happening here [the United States] as we speak. If you are not worried about the future of American democracy, you aren’t paying attention” (Krugmam, 2019, A-25). We are reminded continuously that the late Carl Sagan, one of our most insightful scientific public intellectuals, had an interesting theory about highly developed civilizations. Given the number of stars and planets that must exist in the vast reaches of the universe, he said, there must be other highly developed and organized forms of life. Distance may keep us from making physical contact, but Sagan said that another reason we may never be on speaking terms with another intelligent race is (judging from our own example) could be their penchant for destroying themselves in relatively short order after reaching technological complexity. This book’s chapters, introduction, and conclusion examine the worldwide rise of partisan nationalism and the damage it has wrought on the worldwide pursuit of solutions for issues requiring worldwide scope, such scientific co-operation public health and others, mixing analysis of both. We use both historical description and analysis. This analysis concludes with a description of why we must avoid the isolating nature of nationalism that isolates people and encourages separation if we are to deal with issues of world-wide concern, and to maintain a sustainable, survivable Earth, placing the dominant political movement of our time against the Earth’s existential crises. Our contributors, all experts in their fields, each have assumed responsibility for a country, or two if they are related. This work entwines themes of worldwide concern with the political growth of nationalism because leaders with such a worldview are disinclined to co-operate internationally at a time when nations must find ways to solve common problems, such as the climate crisis. Inability to cooperate at this stage may doom everyone, eventually, to an overheated, stormy future plagued by droughts and deluges portending shortages of food and other essential commodities, meanwhile destroying large coastal urban areas because of rising sea levels. Future historians may look back at our time and wonder why as well as how our world succumbed to isolating nationalism at a time when time was so short for cooperative intervention which is crucial for survival of a sustainable earth. Pride in language and culture is salubrious to individuals’ sense of history and identity. Excess nationalism that prevents international co-operation on harmful worldwide maladies is quite another. As Pope Francis has pointed out: For all of our connectivity due to expansion of social media, ability to communicate can breed contempt as well as mutual trust. “For all our hyper-connectivity,” said Francis, “We witnessed a fragmentation that made it more difficult to resolve problems that affect us all” (Horowitz, 2020, A-12). The pope’s encyclical, titled “Brothers All,” also said: “The forces of myopic, extremist, resentful, and aggressive nationalism are on the rise.” The pope’s document also advocates support for migrants, as well as resistance to nationalist and tribal populism. Francis broadened his critique to the role of market capitalism, as well as nationalism has failed the peoples of the world when they need co-operation and solidarity in the face of the world-wide corona virus pandemic. Humankind needs to unite into “a new sense of the human family [Fratelli Tutti, “Brothers All”], that rejects war at all costs” (Pope, 2020, 6-A). Our journey takes us first to Russia, with the able eye and honed expertise of Richard D. Anderson, Jr. who teaches as UCLA and publishes on the subject of his chapter: “Putin, Russian identity, and Russia’s conduct at home and abroad.” Readers should find Dr. Anderson’s analysis fascinating because Vladimir Putin, the singular leader of Russian foreign and domestic policy these days (and perhaps for the rest of his life, given how malleable Russia’s Constitution has become) may be a short man physically, but has high ambitions. One of these involves restoring the old Russian (and Soviet) empire, which would involve re-subjugating a number of nations that broke off as the old order dissolved about 30 years ago. President (shall we say czar?) Putin also has international ambitions, notably by destabilizing the United States, where election meddling has become a specialty. The sight of Putin and U.S. president Donald Trump, two very rich men (Putin $70-$200 billion; Trump $2.5 billion), nuzzling in friendship would probably set Thomas Jefferson and Vladimir Lenin spinning in their graves. The road of history can take some unanticipated twists and turns. Consider Poland, from which we have an expert native analysis in chapter 2, Bartosz Hlebowicz, who is a Polish anthropologist and journalist. His piece is titled “Lawless and Unjust: How to Quickly Make Your Own Country a Puppet State Run by a Group of Hoodlums – the Hopeless Case of Poland (2015–2020).” When I visited Poland to teach and lecture twice between 2006 and 2008, most people seemed to be walking on air induced by freedom to conduct their own affairs to an unusual degree for a state usually squeezed between nationalists in Germany and Russia. What did the Poles then do in a couple of decades? Read Hlebowicz’ chapter and decide. It certainly isn’t soft-bellied liberalism. In Chapter 3, with Bruce E. Johansen, we visit China’s western provinces, the lands of Tibet as well as the Uighurs and other Muslims in the Xinjiang region, who would most assuredly resent being characterized as being possessed by the Chinese of the Han to the east. As a student of Native American history, I had never before thought of the Tibetans and Uighurs as Native peoples struggling against the Independence-minded peoples of a land that is called an adjunct of China on most of our maps. The random act of sitting next to a young woman on an Air India flight out of Hyderabad, bound for New Delhi taught me that the Tibetans had something to share with the Lakota, the Iroquois, and hundreds of other Native American states and nations in North America. Active resistance to Chinese rule lasted into the mid-nineteenth century, and continues today in a subversive manner, even in song, as I learned in 2018 when I acted as a foreign adjudicator on a Ph.D. dissertation by a Tibetan student at the University of Madras (in what is now in a city called Chennai), in southwestern India on resistance in song during Tibet’s recent history. Tibet is one of very few places on Earth where a young dissident can get shot to death for singing a song that troubles China’s Quest for Lebensraum. The situation in Xinjiang region, where close to a million Muslims have been interned in “reeducation” camps surrounded with brick walls and barbed wire. They sing, too. Come with us and hear the music. Back to Europe now, in Chapter 4, to Portugal and Spain, we find a break in the general pattern of nationalism. Portugal has been more progressive governmentally than most. Spain varies from a liberal majority to military coups, a pattern which has been exported to Latin America. A situation such as this can make use of the term “populism” problematic, because general usage in our time usually ties the word into a right-wing connotative straightjacket. “Populism” can be used to describe progressive (left-wing) insurgencies as well. José Pinto, who is native to Portugal and also researches and writes in Spanish as well as English, in “Populism in Portugal and Spain: a Real Neighbourhood?” provides insight into these historical paradoxes. Hungary shares some historical inclinations with Poland (above). Both emerged from Soviet dominance in an air of developing freedom and multicultural diversity after the Berlin Wall fell and the Soviet Union collapsed. Then, gradually at first, right wing-forces began to tighten up, stripping structures supporting popular freedom, from the courts, mass media, and other institutions. In Chapter 5, Bernard Tamas, in “From Youth Movement to Right-Liberal Wing Authoritarianism: The Rise of Fidesz and the Decline of Hungarian Democracy” puts the renewed growth of political and social repression into a context of worldwide nationalism. Tamas, an associate professor of political science at Valdosta State University, has been a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University and a Fulbright scholar at the Central European University in Budapest, Hungary. His books include From Dissident to Party Politics: The Struggle for Democracy in Post-Communist Hungary (2007). Bear in mind that not everyone shares Orbán’s vision of what will make this nation great, again. On graffiti-covered walls in Budapest, Runes (traditional Hungarian script) has been found that read “Orbán is a motherfucker” (Mikanowski, 2019, 58). Also in Europe, in Chapter 6, Professor Ronan Le Coadic, of the University of Rennes, Rennes, France, in “Is There a Revival of French Nationalism?” Stating this title in the form of a question is quite appropriate because France’s nationalistic shift has built and ebbed several times during the last few decades. For a time after 2000, it came close to assuming the role of a substantial minority, only to ebb after that. In 2017, the candidate of the National Front reached the second round of the French presidential election. This was the second time this nationalist party reached the second round of the presidential election in the history of the Fifth Republic. In 2002, however, Jean-Marie Le Pen had only obtained 17.79% of the votes, while fifteen years later his daughter, Marine Le Pen, almost doubled her father's record, reaching 33.90% of the votes cast. Moreover, in the 2019 European elections, re-named Rassemblement National obtained the largest number of votes of all French political formations and can therefore boast of being "the leading party in France.” The brutality of oppressive nationalism may be expressed in personal relationships, such as child abuse. While Indonesia and Aotearoa [the Maoris’ name for New Zealand] hold very different ranks in the United Nations Human Development Programme assessments, where Indonesia is classified as a medium development country and Aotearoa New Zealand as a very high development country. In Chapter 7, “Domestic Violence Against Women in Indonesia and Aotearoa New Zealand: Making Sense of Differences and Similarities” co-authors, in Chapter 8, Mandy Morgan and Dr. Elli N. Hayati, from New Zealand and Indonesia respectively, found that despite their socio-economic differences, one in three women in each country experience physical or sexual intimate partner violence over their lifetime. In this chapter ther authors aim to deepen understandings of domestic violence through discussion of the socio-economic and demographic characteristics of theit countries to address domestic violence alongside studies of women’s attitudes to gender norms and experiences of intimate partner violence. One of the most surprising and upsetting scholarly journeys that a North American student may take involves Adolf Hitler’s comments on oppression of American Indians and Blacks as he imagined the construction of the Nazi state, a genesis of nationalism that is all but unknown in the United States of America, traced in this volume (Chapter 8) by co-editor Johansen. Beginning in Mein Kampf, during the 1920s, Hitler explicitly used the westward expansion of the United States across North America as a model and justification for Nazi conquest and anticipated colonization by Germans of what the Nazis called the “wild East” – the Slavic nations of Poland, the Baltic states, Ukraine, and Russia, most of which were under control of the Soviet Union. The Volga River (in Russia) was styled by Hitler as the Germans’ Mississippi, and covered wagons were readied for the German “manifest destiny” of imprisoning, eradicating, and replacing peoples the Nazis deemed inferior, all with direct references to events in North America during the previous century. At the same time, with no sense of contradiction, the Nazis partook of a long-standing German romanticism of Native Americans. One of Goebbels’ less propitious schemes was to confer honorary Aryan status on Native American tribes, in the hope that they would rise up against their oppressors. U.S. racial attitudes were “evidence [to the Nazis] that America was evolving in the right direction, despite its specious rhetoric about equality.” Ming Xie, originally from Beijing, in the People’s Republic of China, in Chapter 9, “News Coverage and Public Perceptions of the Social Credit System in China,” writes that The State Council of China in 2014 announced “that a nationwide social credit system would be established” in China. “Under this system, individuals, private companies, social organizations, and governmental agencies are assigned a score which will be calculated based on their trustworthiness and daily actions such as transaction history, professional conduct, obedience to law, corruption, tax evasion, and academic plagiarism.” The “nationalism” in this case is that of the state over the individual. China has 1.4 billion people; this system takes their measure for the purpose of state control. Once fully operational, control will be more subtle. People who are subject to it, through modern technology (most often smart phones) will prompt many people to self-censor. Orwell, modernized, might write: “Your smart phone is watching you.” Ming Xie holds two Ph.Ds, one in Public Administration from University of Nebraska at Omaha and another in Cultural Anthropology from the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, Beijing, where she also worked for more than 10 years at a national think tank in the same institution. While there she summarized news from non-Chinese sources for senior members of the Chinese Communist Party. Ming is presently an assistant professor at the Department of Political Science and Criminal Justice, West Texas A&M University. In Chapter 10, analyzing native peoples and nationhood, Barbara Alice Mann, Professor of Honours at the University of Toledo, in “Divide, et Impera: The Self-Genocide Game” details ways in which European-American invaders deprive the conquered of their sense of nationhood as part of a subjugation system that amounts to genocide, rubbing out their languages and cultures -- and ultimately forcing the native peoples to assimilate on their own, for survival in a culture that is foreign to them. Mann is one of Native American Studies’ most acute critics of conquests’ contradictions, and an author who retrieves Native history with a powerful sense of voice and purpose, having authored roughly a dozen books and numerous book chapters, among many other works, who has traveled around the world lecturing and publishing on many subjects. Nalanda Roy and S. Mae Pedron in Chapter 11, “Understanding the Face of Humanity: The Rohingya Genocide.” describe one of the largest forced migrations in the history of the human race, the removal of 700,000 to 800,000 Muslims from Buddhist Myanmar to Bangladesh, which itself is already one of the most crowded and impoverished nations on Earth. With about 150 million people packed into an area the size of Nebraska and Iowa (population less than a tenth that of Bangladesh, a country that is losing land steadily to rising sea levels and erosion of the Ganges river delta. The Rohingyas’ refugee camp has been squeezed onto a gigantic, eroding, muddy slope that contains nearly no vegetation. However, Bangladesh is majority Muslim, so while the Rohingya may starve, they won’t be shot to death by marauding armies. Both authors of this exquisite (and excruciating) account teach at Georgia Southern University in Savannah, Georgia, Roy as an associate professor of International Studies and Asian politics, and Pedron as a graduate student; Roy originally hails from very eastern India, close to both Myanmar and Bangladesh, so he has special insight into the context of one of the most brutal genocides of our time, or any other. This is our case describing the problems that nationalism has and will pose for the sustainability of the Earth as our little blue-and-green orb becomes more crowded over time. The old ways, in which national arguments often end in devastating wars, are obsolete, given that the Earth and all the people, plants, and other animals that it sustains are faced with the existential threat of a climate crisis that within two centuries, more or less, will flood large parts of coastal cities, and endanger many species of plants and animals. To survive, we must listen to the Earth, and observe her travails, because they are increasingly our own.

Book chapters on the topic "Language policy – South Africa – Eastern Cape":

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Kumar, Deepak. "The language policy and inequalities in institutions of higher learning in South Africa." In Quality Assurance in Higher Education in Eastern and Southern Africa, 174–83. London: Routledge, 2021. http://dx.doi.org/10.4324/9781003141235-20.

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Nhemachena, Charles, and James Chakwizira. "Spatial Mapping and Analysis of Integrated Agricultural Land Use and Infrastructure in Mhlontlo Local Municipality, Eastern Cape, South Africa." In Developments in Soil Classification, Land Use Planning and Policy Implications, 505–21. Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands, 2013. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-5332-7_28.

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Asogwa, Brendan E. "E-Government Development in Africa." In Advances in Electronic Government, Digital Divide, and Regional Development, 1–20. IGI Global, 2015. http://dx.doi.org/10.4018/978-1-4666-6296-4.ch001.

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This chapter assesses the status of e-government practice in Africa. It identifies the best and least e-government states and developing sub-regions and the challenges. Data on e-government practice in Africa by the United Nations was extracted and used for measuring the e-government status of selected African states and their sub-regions. Eastern and Central African Sub-Regions were respectively the best and the least among the regions, while Morocco, South Africa, Kenya, Cape Verde, and Angola were the best e-government practicing states. The major impediments to e-government development were inadequately skilled ICT personnel and insufficient telecommunication infrastructure. Consequently, e-government development in many African states is likely to suffer terrible setbacks unless radical reformations are taken to address the issue of human resource underdevelopment and inadequate ICT infrastructure. Results of this survey could guide policy makers towards optimal manpower planning for effective ICT development.

Conference papers on the topic "Language policy – South Africa – Eastern Cape":

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Adedeji, Paul A., Stephen Akinlabi, Nkosinathi Madushele, and Obafemi O. Olatunji. "Latent Dynamics in Siting Onshore Wind Energy Farms: A Case of a Wind Farm in South Africa." In ASME 2020 Power Conference collocated with the 2020 International Conference on Nuclear Engineering. American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 2020. http://dx.doi.org/10.1115/power2020-16726.

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Abstract Siting a renewable energy facility entails several latent but influential quantitative and qualitative variables. Empirical and analytical models often fail to unravel the dynamics of these variables however; prior knowledge of their existence and dynamics offers knowledge-based decision-making during the plant siting process. This article examines the significance and dynamics of land ownership, avian environment, and renewable energy policies. Asides the literature survey, review of government policy, and regulations, a semi-structured interview-based method was used in this study using a wind power plant in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa as a case study. A qualitative content analysis was used for response analysis. From our findings, dynamics around land ownership could be complex depending on the land category and existing contracts between a landowner and the developer. Also, an in-extensive study of avian habitat in seemingly viable land could lead to forced-downtime of wind turbine generators at periods where production is notably high. Lastly, careful examination of prevailing renewable energy policies and a projection on future policies culminates into the viability of the investment. Trivializing these variables before site development could lead to investment loss through low-productivity or force-majeure in the investment. On the overall, the proposed solutions to these barriers can be useful for wind developers in solving similar problems in other renewable energy resources both in South Africa and other countries.
2

Fosu, Agyei. "Technology versus Quality Education in an Underdeveloped Region: A Case Study of UNISA Students in Former Ciskei Homeland in Eastern Cape." In InSITE 2017: Informing Science + IT Education Conferences: Vietnam. Informing Science Institute, 2017. http://dx.doi.org/10.28945/3780.

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Aim/Purpose: This paper seeks to show how University of South Africa (UNISA) is using technology to connect lecturers, tutors and students of [UNISA] in an underdeveloped region in South Africa (SA) to reduce cost and time of travelling to access information, tutorials and help [available] in designated centers, hence making quality and higher education more accessible and less costly. Background: This empirical study gives evidence to back the effectiveness, helpfulness and cost reduction of using technology as a medium of making quality and higher education accessible to under developed regions. Methodology Quantitative and purposeful sampling was deemed appropriate for the study, whereby 200 questionnaires was developed and specifically distributed to UNISA students from former Ciskei towns at East London Tutorial Center. Contribution: The paper is about the usage of mobile technology for knowledge creation and dissemination, instruction and learning, The data generated and presented add to the knowledge base about underdeveloped countries. This data and the conclusions reached based the analysis could be of interest to researchers, university administrators, politicians, planners and policy makers in underdeveloped countries. Findings: Evaluation of the overall effectiveness, helpfulness and cost reduction of e-tutorials show a slight advantage over the face-face tutorials. Recommendations for Practitioners: In the quest for ways and means of making quality and higher education accessible to underdeveloped regions, no matter which medium is chosen, the periodic measurement of success in terms of effectiveness, helpfulness, and cost implication in relation to the learner cannot be over looked. Recommendation for Researchers: More work needs to be done to check the effectiveness of technology as an efficient medium to provide access to quality and higher education to underdeveloped regional economies. Impact on Society The results could have significant implications for raising the level of education and advancing employment equity by improving the delivery and accessibility to quality and higher education to underdeveloped regional economies. Future Research: The analysis of cost efficiency and effectiveness done in this work is just representative of one point of view: the student one of accessibility and cost. There is, however, need in future work to research the implications for the institutions of higher education (in terms teaching design, curriculum design, knowledge of individual learning types, need for change in and rate of change in knowledge view, learning philosophies), individual stakeholders, and the competitive repositioning of society.
3

Fosu, Agyei. "Readiness of Universities for the 21st Century Digital Economies: A Look at Selected Lecturers from Universities in Buffalo City Metropolitan in Eastern Cape Province, South Africa [Abstract]." In InSITE 2020: Informing Science + IT Education Conferences: Online. Informing Science Institute, 2020. http://dx.doi.org/10.28945/4593.

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[The full paper was previously published in the International Journal of Community Development & Management Studies, 3, 65-77.] Aim/Purpose: The purpose of this study is to expand the knowledge base on factors likely to impede implementation and adoption of web-based learning management systems to blend with traditional methods of lecturing in universities to cater for the next generation of learners in Africa and Eastern Cape Province South Africa in particular. Background: The shift from the industrial economies to 21st century digital and knowledge-based economies, fueled by rapid Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) such as Internet, YouTube, Chartrooms, Skype, Social media networks and its introduction to the educational system not only resulted in a new teaching approach globally but also paved way to usher in new generation of learners (anytime, anywhere learners) in the higher education system. Despite the fact that universities and other institutions of higher education in developed countries and some Africa countries have since recognized that the 21st century global digital and knowledge-based economies evolution has ushered in the next generation of learners, and as a result have taken the necessary steps to blend the traditional method of lecturing in higher education with web-based learning management systems in order to accommodate these learners. However, in Africa not much research has been done on the readiness of higher education institutions in terms of blending web-based learning management systems with the traditional method of lecturing to cater for the next generation of learners. Methodology: Quantitative and two non-probability sampling methods, namely, quota and purposive sampling was used to investigate the technological skills of selected lecturers from universities within Buffalo City Metropolitan as one of the core component to check the readiness of their faculty for the next generation of learners. Contribution: This research will add to the growing knowledge about the blending of web-based learning management with the traditional style of lecturing in higher education in the 21st century digital economies. Findings: The results indicated that the participating lecturers need to be trained and supported in the skills of using of the ICTs and computer programs applicable to enhance web-based learning in teaching and learning environment in higher education in order to cater for the next generation of learners associated with the 21st century digital economies. Recommendations for Practitioners: Much as there is a need for increased in investment in infrastructure within higher education institutions to support teaching and learning, continuous support and training for academics to be technologically literate and also be abreast on rapidly evolving field of ICTs is paramount as it can expedite the teaching and learning process in higher education. Recommendations for Researchers: There is the need to explore in depth the other two components suggested by Mishra and Koehler that can serve as barriers for successfully integration of technology into teaching and learning by locus of knowledge. Impact on Society: The research will assist stakeholders, policy makers and agencies tasked with transforming institutions of higher learning to identify the barriers likely to hinder transformation efforts and address them accordingly. Future Research: Checking technological skills of students are critical in this context.

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