Academic literature on the topic 'Life (living, lifetime)'

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Journal articles on the topic "Life (living, lifetime)":

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Galletly, Cherrie, Shuichi Suetani, Duncan McKellar, and David J. Castle. "T85. LIVING WITH PSYCHOSIS IN LATER LIFE." Schizophrenia Bulletin 46, Supplement_1 (April 2020): S263—S264. http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/schbul/sbaa029.645.

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Abstract Background Whilst there is considerable focus on early intervention for young people with psychotic disorders, there is little research looking at older people. Although some of these individuals have a recent onset, most will have been living with psychosis for many years. The older population has increased risks of cardiometabolic complications and this is likely to be complicated by psychosis. Methods The Australian Survey of People Living with Psychosis included 1478 participants aged 18–49 years, and 346 participants aged 50–64 years. The two groups were compared across a range of demographic, diagnostic, physical health, substance abuse and lifestyle factors. Results The older group contained significantly more women (48.3% vs 38.6%, p<0.0001). There was a smaller proportion of people with ICD-10 schizophrenia (36.1% vs 45.4% p<0.012), and higher proportions with schizoaffective disorder and affective psychoses. Significantly fewer of the older participants were prescribed clozapine (11.0% vs 16.8%, p < 0.0001). The mean age of onset was later in the older group (30.05 vs 22.23 years, p < 0.0001). There was a striking difference in rates of drug and alcohol abuse. The older group had lower rates of hazardous, harmful or dependent drinking (15.3% vs 35.9%, p < 0.0001), lifetime cannabis use (35.6% vs 74.1%, p < 0.0001), past year cannabis use (11.1% vs 38.1%, p < 0.0001), lifetime amphetamine use (12.8% vs 47.0%, p < 0.0001), and past year amphetamine use (2.9% vs 14.9%, p < 0.0001). The older group were also less likely to currently smoke tobacco (56.9% vs 68.9%, p < 0.0001). Older people were more likely to live alone (45.1% vs 28.6%, p < 0.000). They were less likely to experience food poverty; in the last year 19.5% of older people and 30.7% of younger people had run out of food and did not have money to buy more. Cognitive function was poorer with slower processing speed in the older group, with the NART error score indicating premorbid intelligence was lower in the older group. Older people were more likely to be overweight or obese (80.6% vs 74.3%, p < 0.0001), as well as being more likely to have metabolic syndrome (56.1% vs 48.5%, p = 0.034). There was a greater proportion with very low exercise in the older group (41.6% vs 31.7% p = 0.003). Discussion Older people with psychosis are more likely to be female and more likely to be diagnosed with an affective psychosis. The poorer cognitive function and higher rates of obesity and metabolic syndrome are consistent with changes seen in aging in the normal population. The older group have much lower rates of both lifetime and current drug and alcohol abuse, and smoking. Whilst there is considerable attention to cardiovascular health as a determinant of premature mortality, our results suggest that lifetime alcohol, cannabis and amphetamine use may also be associated with failure to survive into older age.
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Wingenbach, Rachel, Jong-Min Kim, and Hojin Jung. "Living longer in high longevity risk." Journal of Demographic Economics 86, no. 1 (February 7, 2020): 47–86. http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/dem.2019.20.

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AbstractThere is considerable uncertainty regarding changes in future mortality rates. This article investigates the impact of such longevity risk on discounted government annuity benefits for retirees. It is critical to forecast more accurate future mortality rates to improve our estimation of an expected annuity payout. Thus, we utilize the Lee–Carter model, which is well-known as a parsimonious dynamic mortality model. We find strong evidence that female retirees are likely to receive more public lifetime annuity than males in the USA, which is associated with systematic mortality rate differences between genders. A cross-country comparison presents that the current public annuity system would not fully cover retiree's longevity risk. Every additional year of life expectancy leaves future retirees exposed to high risk, arising from high volatility of lifetime annuities. Also, because the growth in life expectancy is higher than the growth of expected public pension, there will be a financial risk to retirees.
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Booth, Frank W., Matthew J. Laye, and Michael D. Roberts. "Lifetime sedentary living accelerates some aspects of secondary aging." Journal of Applied Physiology 111, no. 5 (November 2011): 1497–504. http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/japplphysiol.00420.2011.

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Lifetime physical inactivity interacts with secondary aging (i.e., aging caused by diseases and environmental factors) in three patterns of response. First, lifetime physical inactivity confers no apparent effects on a given set of physiological functions. Second, lifetime physical inactivity accelerates secondary aging (e.g., speeding the reduction in bone mineral density, maximal oxygen consumption, and skeletal muscle strength and power), but does not alter the primary aging of these systems. Third, a lifetime of physical activity to the age of ∼60–70 yr old totally prevents decrements in some age-associated risk factors for major chronic diseases, such as endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance. The present review provides ample and compelling evidence that physical inactivity has a large impact in shortening average life expectancy. In summary, physical inactivity plays a major role in the secondary aging of many essential physiological functions, and this aging can be prevented through a lifetime of physical activity.
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McGirr, A., J. Renaud, A. Bureau, M. Seguin, A. Lesage, and G. Turecki. "Impulsive-aggressive behaviours and completed suicide across the life cycle: a predisposition for younger age of suicide." Psychological Medicine 38, no. 3 (September 6, 2007): 407–17. http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s0033291707001419.

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BackgroundIt is unclear whether the association between impulsive-aggressive behaviours and suicide exists across different ages.MethodVia psychological autopsy, we examined a total of 645 subjects aged 11–87 years who died by suicide. Proxy-based interviews were conducted using the SCID-I & SCID-II or K-SADS interviews and a series of behavioural and personality-trait assessments. Secondarily, 246 living controls were similarly assessed.ResultsHigher levels of impulsivity, lifetime history of aggression, and novelty seeking were associated with younger age of death by suicide, while increasing levels of harm avoidance were associated with increasing age of suicide. This effect was observed after accounting for age-related psychopathology (current and lifetime depressive disorders, lifetime anxiety disorders, current and lifetime substance abuse disorders, psychotic disorders and cluster B personality disorders). Age effects were not due to the characteristics of informants, and such effects were not observed among living controls. When directly controlling for major psychopathology, the interaction between age, levels of impulsivity, aggression and novelty seeking predicted suicide status while controlling for the independent contributions of age and these traits.ConclusionsHigher levels of impulsive-aggressive traits play a greater role in suicide occurring among younger individuals, with decreasing importance with increasing age.
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Areias, Maria E. G., Catarina I. Pinto, Patrícia F. Vieira, Marta Castro, Isabela Freitas, Sofia Sarmento, Samantha Matos, Victor Viana, and José C. Areias. "Living with CHD: quality of life (QOL) in early adult life." Cardiology in the Young 24, S2 (August 27, 2014): 60–65. http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s1047951114001218.

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AbstractAimsThe aim of this study was to assess the quality of life, psychiatric morbidity, and the psychosocial adjustment of adolescents and young adults with CHD, and determine which variables play a role in buffering stress and promoting resilience and which ones have a detrimental effect; and to investigate the situation on school performance and failures, social and family support, physical limitations, and body image of these patients.MethodsThe study enrolled 137 CHD patients (79 male), with age ranging from 12 to 26 years old (M=17.60±3.450 years). The patients were interviewed regarding social support, family educational style, self-image, demographic information, and physical limitations. They responded to questions in a standardised psychiatric interview (SADS-L) and completed self-reported questionnaires for the assessment of quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF) and psychosocial adjustment (YSR/ASR).ResultsWe found a 19.7% lifetime prevalence of psychopathology in our patients (27.6% in female and 13.9% in male). Of them, 48% had retentions in school (M=1.61 year±0.82). The perception of quality of life in CHD patients is better compared with the Portuguese population in the social relationships and environmental dimensions. However, it is worse in complex forms of CHD than in moderate-to-mild ones, in cyanotic versus acyanotic patients, in moderate-to-severe versus mild residual lesions, in patients submitted versus those not submitted to surgery, in patients with versus without physical limitations, and patients who have need for medication versus those who do not. Social support is very important in improving quality of life of patients in all dimensions as well as academic performance.ConclusionsFemale patients and patients with poor academic performance and poor social support have worse psychosocial adjustment and perception of quality of life.
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Wong, William WL, Gloria Woo, E. Jenny Heathcote, and Murray Krahn. "Disease Burden of Chronic Hepatitis B among Immigrants in Canada." Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology 27, no. 3 (2013): 137–47. http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/924640.

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BACKGROUND: The prevalence of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection among immigrants to North America ranges from 2% to 15%, 40% of whom develop advanced liver disease. Screening for hepatitis B surface antigen is not recommended for immigrants.OBJECTIVE: To estimate the disease burden of CHB among immigrants in Canada using Markov cohort models comparing a cohort of immigrants with CHB versus a control cohort of immigrants without CHB.METHODS: Markov cohort models were used to estimate life years, quality-adjusted life years and lifetime direct medical costs (adjusted to 2008 Canadian dollars) for a cohort of immigrants with CHB living in Canada in 2006, and an age-matched control cohort of immigrants without CHB living in Canada in 2006. Parameter values were derived from the published literature.RESULTS: At the baseline estimate, the model suggested that the cohort of immigrants with CHB lost an average of 4.6 life years (corresponding to 1.5 quality-adjusted life years), had an increased average of $24,249 for lifetime direct medical costs, and had a higher lifetime risk for decompensated cirrhosis (12%), hepatocellular carcinoma (16%) and need for liver transplant (5%) when compared with the control cohort.DISCUSSION: Results of the present study showed that the socio-economic burden of CHB among immigrants living in Canada is sub-stantial. Governments and health systems need to develop policies that promote early recognition of CHB and raise public awareness regarding hepatitis B to extend the lives of infected immigrants.
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Schramel, Alexis. "Art for a Lifetime." Innovation in Aging 4, Supplement_1 (December 1, 2020): 814–15. http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/geroni/igaa057.2964.

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Abstract Art for a lifetime was a bi-weekly programming opportunity in a long-term care (LTC) community taught by students and faculty. We predicted that 1) Resident physical and mental abilities may influence art-making preferences and 2) residents would be concerned about their perceived lack of creativity. Findings revealed that residents with arthritis preferred working with larger forms (e.g., collage and sculpture) and residents with dementia preferred working with bright, colorful materials. Private one-on-one sessions were beneficial for increasing resident confidence and for working on individual projects. Programming also allowed for increased social opportunities among residents, offering occasions to reflect on life experiences. Overall, facilitators of art programming need to quickly adjust and adapt programming based on resident abilities and preferences. Expanding art programming to other long-term care facilities is important for providing increased opportunities for autonomy and decision making, areas that often become more limited when living in LTC.
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Heidinger, Britt J., Aurelia C. Kucera, Jeff D. Kittilson, and David F. Westneat. "Longer telomeres during early life predict higher lifetime reproductive success in females but not males." Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences 288, no. 1951 (May 26, 2021): 20210560. http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2021.0560.

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The mechanisms that contribute to variation in lifetime reproductive success are not well understood. One possibility is that telomeres, conserved DNA sequences at chromosome ends that often shorten with age and stress exposures, may reflect differences in vital processes or influence fitness. Telomere length often predicts longevity, but longevity is only one component of fitness and little is known about how lifetime reproductive success is related to telomere dynamics in wild populations. We examined the relationships between telomere length beginning in early life, telomere loss into adulthood and lifetime reproductive success in free-living house sparrows ( Passer domesticus ). We found that females, but not males, with longer telomeres during early life had higher lifetime reproductive success, owing to associations with longevity and not reproduction per year or attempt. Telomeres decreased with age in both sexes, but telomere loss was not associated with lifetime reproductive success. In this species, telomeres may reflect differences in quality or condition rather than the pace of life, but only in females. Sexually discordant selection on telomeres is expected to influence the stability and maintenance of within population variation in telomere dynamics and suggests that any role telomeres play in mediating life-history trade-offs may be sex specific.
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Krysinska, Karolina, David Lester, Jennifer Lyke, and Jozef Corveleyn. "Trait Gratitude and Suicidal Ideation and Behavior." Crisis 36, no. 4 (July 2015): 291–96. http://dx.doi.org/10.1027/0227-5910/a000320.

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Abstract. Background: Despite the progress of positive psychology, current knowledge regarding suicide protective factors is limited. Trait gratitude (a tendency to experience gratitude in daily life) may protect against suicidal ideation and behavior. Aims: The study tested a model of causal effects among gratitude, religiosity, reasons for living, coping, and social support as predictors of suicidal ideation, suicide threats, and suicide attempts after controlling for depression and stressful life events. Method: A sample of 165 college students were administered measures of gratitude, religiosity, reasons for living, social support, coping skills, stress, and depression. The study assessed lifetime and current suicidal ideation as well as lifetime suicide threat and attempt. Results: Both gratitude and religiosity, along with social support, coping skills, and reasons for living, correlated negatively with prior suicidal ideation, but not with prior attempted suicide. After controlling for risk factor (depression and stress), the impact of gratitude and religiosity was no longer statistically significant. Conclusion: Further research could help understand the role of positive emotions and human strengths, such as gratitude, in preventing and alleviating suicidal ideation and behavior.
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Le Boeuf, Burney, Richard Condit, and Joanne Reiter. "Lifetime reproductive success of northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris)." Canadian Journal of Zoology 97, no. 12 (December 2019): 1203–17. http://dx.doi.org/10.1139/cjz-2019-0104.

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Lifetime reproductive success of individuals in a natural population provides an estimate of Darwinian fitness. We calculated lifetime reproductive success in a colony of female northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris (Gill, 1866)) by monitoring annual breeding throughout life of 7735 female weanlings marked individually at Año Nuevo, California, USA, from 1963 to 2005. Great variation in lifetime reproductive success was evident in three aspects of life history: (1) 75% of the females died before reaching breeding age and produced no pups; (2) nearly half of the survivors bred for only a few years before dying, and young females had low weaning success; (3) less than 1% of the females in the sample were exceptionally successful producing up to 20 pups in life. Many females that bred early, while still growing, had decreased lifespan, low weaning success, and lower lifetime reproductive success than females that postponed first breeding. Exceptional reproductive success was associated with giving birth annually, living long (up to age 23), and weaning large pups that were more likely to survive and breed. We conclude that there is strong selection for increased lifespan and multiparous supermoms that contribute significantly to pup production in the next generation.

Dissertations / Theses on the topic "Life (living, lifetime)":

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Sigurjonsdottir, Hjördis. "Integration – A Lifetime Project : Analysis of the Integration Process of Quota Refugees in Iceland." Student thesis, Stockholms universitet, Kulturgeografiska institutionen, 2016. http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:su:diva-131808.

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Due to an increased flow of refugees over the past few years, affairs of refugees have caught increased attention. The aim of this thesis is to analyze the integration process of an earlier group of quota refugees who came to rural Iceland in 1998, from former Yugoslavia. Eighteen years have passed and the refugees’ views of entering and living in Icelandic society will help to understand the process of integration and the role of migration in an ever-changing social context and in times of rapid globalization. The study aims to explore two questions: 1) How did the life events of the refugees affect their integration processes? 2) How did transnational practices impact the integration processes? In-depth interviews were carried out and a life course perspective was the method used for obtaining the refugees’ stories and life experiences, and to investigate their integration processes. The analysis draws on the theories of integration, life course perspective, transnationalism and social networks. This study indicates that transnational practices are beneficial for the lifetime project of integration. Access to an extended social network of relatives and co-ethnics also plays a crucial role. Another important element for integration is the feeling of normal life, supported by a feeling of security in the physical, economic and institutional sense.
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Ricks, Joi Elizabeth. "Living outside the box: sustaining the lifelong community through universal design." Thesis, Georgia Institute of Technology, 2010. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/34732.

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We all want to live in a healthy community. Each of us has his or her own image of what such a community should look like. That image is shaped, in part, by our reaction to the communities in which we now live or used to live. However we often take for granted the elements of communities that enable and sometimes disable many of us to remain active in a community for a lifetime. For older residents, a lifelong community would include elements that help them to maintain independence and quality of life. The physical characteristics of a community often play a major role in facilitating our personal independence. In order to combat the growing challenges and health concerns facing the American lifestyle this research proposes a set of design guidelines that promote sustainable lifelong communities that are universally designed for people of all ages and levels of physical ability. The purpose of developing a set of universal design guidelines for lifelong communities is to alleviate many of the physical barriers and challenges that prevent some Americans from active involvement in the community. The methods employed to develop these guidelines were based on literature review and analysis. This research was incorporated into a new body of practical standards that was tested against a real life community in Decatur, Georgia. These standards were edited and revised to appropriately accommodate the necessary adaptations that were discovered during the evaluation phase. The resultant guidelines are presented with the intention of becoming a usable guide for planning agencies such as the Atlanta Regional Commission and other local and national community design facilitators.
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N'Dreman, Assoi Jean-Luc. "Ethique et poétique dans l'oeuvre de Paul Ricoeur et dans les traditions africaines." Electronic Thesis or Diss., Lyon 3, 2013. http://www.theses.fr/2012LYO30088/document.

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La philosophie ricœurienne indique qu’il n’est pas de compréhension de soi qui ne soit médiatisée par des signes, des symboles, des textes ; elle peut donc être interprétée comme une chance pour la philosophie africaine. En effet, si on estime que le champ éthique s’étend à tous les domaines de la vie, si on admet avec Ricœur que l’existence est synonyme d’action, à savoir que « dire ‘’je suis’’, c’est dire ‘’je veux, je meus, je fais’’ », alors l’Africain traditionnel qui n’a pas une pensée systématique comme l’exige la philosophie grecque, mais a plutôt développé une pensée de ce qu’il fait, peut apporter au discours éthique sa modeste contribution. En effet, ses mythes, ses contes et même quelquefois ses chants, contiennent un enseignement à la fois pratique, symbolique et philosophique, à caractère universel. Entrer à l’intérieur d’un conte, c’est comme entrer à l’intérieur de soi-même
Ricoeur’s philosophy shows us that there is not any comprehension of self without it being mediated by signs, symbols and texts; it can be, therefore, interpreted as a chance given to the African philosophy. In fact, if we estimate that the ethical field extends to all human domains and if we admit, like Ricoeur does, the synonymy between action and existence – “to say I am, means I want, I move, I do” – thus the traditional African, who hasn’t a systematical thinking as required by the Greek philosophy, but instead has developed a thinking of what he can do, can bring into the ethical discourse his modest contribution. In reality, his myths, his tales and sometimes his chants, all contain a message that is at the same time: practical, symbolical and philosophical, with a universal character. To enter into a tail is like entering inside one’s self

Books on the topic "Life (living, lifetime)":

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Ni, Hua Ching. The power of positive living: The opportunity of a lifetime. Santa Monica, CA: SevenStar Communications, 1995.

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Ward, Isiah Paul. The divine ultimate transformer: A philosophy for living : with messages for a lifetime. Willowbrook, IL: Millennium Bridge, 2010.

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Huckabee, Mike. Living beyond your lifetime: How to be intentional about the legacy you leave. Nashville, Tenn: Broadman & Holman, 2000.

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Jorgensen, James A. Money lessons for a lifetime: Stories, observations, and tips on living a prosperous life. Chicago, Ill: Dearborn Financial Pub., 1997.

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Miller, Janette Brand. The new glucose revolution life plan: Discover how to make the glycemic index-- the most significant dietary finding of the last 25 years-- the foundation for a lifetime of healthy eating. New York: Marlowe & Co., 2004.

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Brehony, Kathleen A. Living A Connected Life: Creating and Maintaining Relationships that Last a Lifetime. Holt Paperbacks, 2003.

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Jorgensen, Jim. Money Lessons for a Lifetime: Stories, Observations and Tips on Living a Prosperous Life. CareerTrack, 1998.

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Masuno, Shunmyo. The Art of Simple Living: 100 Daily Practices from a Japanese Zen Monk for a Lifetime of Calm and Joy. Penguin Books, 2019.

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Brand-Miller, Dr Jennie, Kaye Foster-Powell, and Johanna Burani. The New Glucose Revolution Life Plan: Discover How to Make the Glycemic Index the Foundation for a Lifetime of Healthy Eating (Glucose Revolution). Marlowe & Company, 2004.

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Blanchett, David, Michael Finke, and Wade Pfau. Low Returns and Optimal Retirement Savings. Oxford University Press, 2018. http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780198827443.003.0003.

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Lifetime financial outcomes relate closely to the sequence of investment returns earned over the life cycle. Higher return assumptions allow individuals to save at a lower rate, withdraw at a higher rate, retire with a lower wealth accumulation, and enjoy a higher standard of living. While analysis of this topic is often based on historical investment performance, present bond yields are historically low and equity prices are quite high, suggesting that individuals will likely experience lower returns in the future. This implies the need for higher savings rates, lower withdrawal rates, a larger nest egg at retirement, and a lower lifetime standard of living. We show that lower-income workers will need to save about 50 percent more if low rates of return persist in the future, and higher-income workers will need to save nearly twice as much in a low return environment compared to the optimal savings using historical returns.

Book chapters on the topic "Life (living, lifetime)":

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Band-Winterstein, Tova, Hila Avieli, and Peli Mushkin. "Personal Accounts of Living with Schizophrenia across a Lifetime: Coping Strategies and Subjective Perspectives." In Schizophrenia and Psychoses in Later Life, 200–211. Cambridge University Press, 2019. http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/9781108539593.017.

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Zeitlin, Steve. "The Human Unit of Time." In The Poetry of Everyday Life. Cornell University Press, 2016. http://dx.doi.org/10.7591/cornell/9781501702358.003.0016.

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This chapter considers the human unit for marking time. In her memoir Blackberry Winter, Margaret Mead devotes a chapter to the joys of becoming a grandparent. Grandparenthood inspired Mead to consider the need for a human unit of time, the span of which cannot be as short as a human lifetime, and yet cannot rely on the scientist's notion of time stretching back millions of years to the Big Bang. This human time span, based on experiential reckoning rather than scientific exactitude, stretches from our memories of ourselves as children to our grandparents' memories of their own childhoods, ultimately encompassing five generations. Folklorists echo Mead's notion when they speak of “a living cultural heritage,” because we are often referring to traditions and histories passed on through living memory. This chapter considers the space between memory and legacy and suggests that generational time is an aspect of the poetry of everyday life.
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Pechenik, Jan A. "Life Cycles." In Evolutionary Ecology. Oxford University Press, 2001. http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780195131543.003.0016.

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I have a Hardin cartoon on my office door. It shows a series of animals thinking about the meaning of life. In sequence, we see a lobe-finned fish, a salamander, a lizard, and a monkey, all thinking, “Eat, survive, reproduce; eat, survive, reproduce.” Then comes man: “What's it all about?” he wonders. Organisms live to reproduce. The ultimate selective pressure on any organism is to survive long enough and well enough to pass genetic material to a next generation that will also be successful in reproducing. In this sense, then, every morphological, physiological, biochemical, or behavioral adaptation contributes to reproductive success, making the field of life cycle evolution a very broad one indeed. Key components include mode of sexuality, age and size at first reproduction (Roff, this volume), number of reproductive episodes in a lifetime, offspring size (Messina and Fox, this volume), fecundity, the extent to which parents protect their offspring and how that protection is achieved, source of nutrition during development, survival to maturity, the consequences of shifts in any of these components, and the underlying mechanisms responsible for such shifts. Many of these issues are dealt with in other chapters. Here I focus exclusively on animals, and on a particularly widespread sort of life cycle that includes at least two ecologically distinct free-living stages. Such “complex life cycles” (Istock 1967) are especially common among amphibians and fishes (Hall and Wake 1999), and within most invertebrate groups, including insects (Gilbert and Frieden 1981), crustaceans, bivalves, gastropods, polychaete worms, echinoderms, bryozoans, and corals and other cnidarians (Thorson 1950). In such life cycles, the juvenile or adult stage is reached by metamorphosing from a preceding, free-living larval stage. In many species, metamorphosis involves a veritable revolution in morphology, ecology, behavior, and physiology, sometimes taking place in as little as a few minutes or a few hours. In addition to the issues already mentioned, key components of such complex life cycles include the timing of metamorphosis (i.e., when it occurs), the size at which larvae metamorphose, and the consequences of metamorphosing at particular times or at particular sizes. The potential advantages of including larval stages in the life history have been much discussed.
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Rogoff, Leonard. "Legacy." In Gertrude Weil. University of North Carolina Press, 2017. http://dx.doi.org/10.5149/northcarolina/9781469630793.003.0014.

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Weil is still remembered in scholarly publications on the women's movement and American Jewry. Although her ideals of ending war, poverty, and racial inequality were not wholly realized, incremental advances were achieved over her lifetime. She would regret persisting inequalities of wealth and the resegregation of schools. Her liberal Zionism has also underwent challenge as Israel confronted wars and demographic change. Weil's legacy was as a practical idealist, not an ideologue nor revolutionary. Living on the fault lines of North Carolina's social and political contradictions, she was a both conservative and progressive, both traditional and modern. Her lasting legacy is the example she set of living a life of public service while retaining her humanity
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Cookson, Richard, Owen Cotton-Barratt, Matthew D. Adler, Miqdad Asaria, and Toby Ord. "Years of Good Life Based on Consumption and Health." In Measuring the Global Burden of Disease, edited by Nir Eyal, Samia A. Hurst, Christopher J. L. Murray, S. Andrew Schroeder, and Daniel Wikler, 126–50. Oxford University Press, 2020. http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/med/9780190082543.003.0009.

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This chapter proposes a practical measure of individual well-being to facilitate the economic evaluation of public policies. The authors propose to evaluate policies in terms of years of good life gained, in a practical and flexible way that complements and builds upon the standard outcome measures used in cost-effectiveness and cost–benefit analysis. The authors show how to do this by adjusting years of life lived for consumption-related quality of life—that is, the material standard of living—as well as health-related quality of life. This is a straightforward extension of the quality-adjusted life year metric used in health economics for measuring years of healthy life. The authors’ approach allows for differences between people in the marginal value of money. It also permits distributional impact analysis in terms of lifetime well-being—that is, how many good years of life different people can expect over the course of their lives. The authors aim to show how years of good life could be measured in practice by harnessing readily available data on three important elements of individual well-being: consumption, health-related quality of life, and mortality. They also aim to identify the main ethical assumptions needed to use this measure.
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Hammerton, A. James. "The quest for new lifestyles: migration, treechange and grey nomads." In Migrants of the British Diaspora Since the 1960s. Manchester University Press, 2017. http://dx.doi.org/10.7228/manchester/9781526116574.003.0008.

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This chapter canvasses the turn to ‘lifestyle’ goals in migration, in ‘escape stories’, in drives to realise ecological principles and anti-urban ideology and in quests for a ‘purer’ way of life often driven by enhanced modern expressions of individualism. It begins with two examples of ‘island stories’, on Salt Spring Island in British Columbia, and on Dangar Island in New South Wales. Both exemplify ‘escape’ themes alongside ecological pursuits, close-knit community living and local identities. ‘Tree-change’ stories’ denote similar lifestyle passions, one shaping a lifetime pursuit for Nordic landscapes, finally settling in New Zealand. Others establish connections between lifestyle goals and ‘new age’ aspirations, settling in locations associated with alternative lifestyles like Byron Bay in New South Wales. Cosmopolitan identities co-existed with continuing mobility, a strong sense of place and high valuation on belonging to ‘the land’. ‘Grey nomad’ touring marked the ultimate extension of serial migration, with a nomadic couple’s account of passions for global mobility and lifestyle pursuits into retirement years, recalling former migration while continuing permanent itinerancy in the mobile home, earning a living on the road without fixed address.
7

Kupfer, David J., and Susan K. Schultz. "DSM-5 Overview and Goals." In Neurobiology of Mental Illness, edited by Dennis S. Charney, 1067–71. Oxford University Press, 2013. http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/med/9780199934959.003.0081.

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The road to DSM-5 spanned a decade of planning, discussion and review of the considerable advances in psychiatric research and clinical practice. By bridging the strengths of DSM-IV with the opportunities brought by new discoveries in neuroscience, the DSM-5 offers a foundation for future growth as we fill in our gaps of knowledge regarding the underlying pathologies of mental disorders. New features in DSM-5 include an organizational structure that permits alignment of disorders with shared putative pathogenesis irrespective of whether the disorders typically emerge in childhood or later in life. Other features include a new emphasis on risk factors and the development and life course of illness. The goal of the DSM-5 is to create a “living document” that may evolve over time as we gradually build on our knowledge of the neurobiologic underpinnings that account for both the emergence and lifetime expression of mental disorders.
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Hoermann, Raphael. "‘Fermentation will be universal’: Intersections of Race and Class in Robert Wedderburn’s Black Atlantic Discourse of Transatlantic Revolution." In Britain's Black Past, 295–314. Liverpool University Press, 2020. http://dx.doi.org/10.3828/liverpool/9781789621600.003.0017.

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The speeches and writings of Robert Wedderburn are the subject of this chapter by Raphael Hoermann who contrasts Wedderburn’s radical brand of abolitionism, rooted in self-emancipation and slave agency, to the conservative, Evangelical approach of William Wilberforce’s moral appeals to white liberators. Hoermann recounts some of the biographical background Wedderburn provides in his self-published pamphlet, The Horrors of Slavery, and draws connections between Wedderburn’s life—as the progeny of a white slaveholder father and black slave mother, and his impoverished life in London eking out a living as a tailor—and the political ideologies he promoted. Hoermann highlights Wedderburn’s provocative argument for a violent overthrow of slavery and his critique of British capitalism that interlinked class and race exploitation as ideas that kept him on the fringes of both the abolitionist and working class movements during his lifetime and have kept him an understudied, obscure historical figure.
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Freudenberg, Nicholas. "Work." In At What Cost, 153–96. Oxford University Press, 2021. http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780190078621.003.0005.

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Work gives people dignity, income, and political voice but it also puts people at risk of premature death, jeopardizes self-sufficiency, and dominates workers’ lives. How a person experiences work profoundly influences well-being and lifetime success. How a society organizes work opportunities shapes public health, fairness, and democracy. This chapter describes how changes in modern capitalism have expanded a workforce that is low paid with few benefits, inadequately protected against workplace hazards, and lacking in economic security. It explains how deregulation, low wages, weakened labor laws, and the rise of the gig economy have worsened the life circumstances of millions of U.S. workers, threatening their physical and mental health. The chapter also describes how new forms of labor organizing and new coalitions have promoted pro-worker policies such as living wages, sick and parental leave, laws against wage theft, and universal health care and childcare.
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Meghanathan, Natarajan, and Philip Mumford. "Graph Intersection-Based Benchmarking Algorithm for Maximum Stability Data Gathering Trees in Wireless Mobile Sensor Networks." In Advances in Wireless Technologies and Telecommunication, 433–58. IGI Global, 2014. http://dx.doi.org/10.4018/978-1-4666-5170-8.ch017.

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The authors propose a graph intersection-based benchmarking algorithm to determine the sequence of longest-living stable data gathering trees for wireless mobile sensor networks whose topology changes dynamically with time due to the random movement of the sensor nodes. Referred to as the Maximum Stability-based Data Gathering (Max.Stable-DG) algorithm, the algorithm assumes the availability of complete knowledge of future topology changes and is based on the following greedy principle coupled with the idea of graph intersections: Whenever a new data gathering tree is required at time instant t corresponding to a round of data aggregation, choose the longest-living data gathering tree from time t. The above strategy is repeated for subsequent rounds over the lifetime of the sensor network to obtain the sequence of longest-living stable data gathering trees spanning all the live sensor nodes in the network such that the number of tree discoveries is the global minimum. In addition to theoretically proving the correctness of the Max.Stable-DG algorithm (that it yields the lower bound for the number of discoveries for any network-wide communication topology like spanning trees), the authors also conduct exhaustive simulations to evaluate the performance of the Max.Stable-DG trees and compare to that of the minimum-distance spanning tree-based data gathering trees with respect to metrics such as tree lifetime, delay per round, node lifetime and network lifetime, under both sufficient-energy and energy-constrained scenarios.

Conference papers on the topic "Life (living, lifetime)":

1

Brumovsky, Milan. "VERLIFE: Unified Procedure for Lifetime Assessment of Components and Piping in WWER NPPs During Operation—Updating and Further Development." In ASME 2009 Pressure Vessels and Piping Conference. ASMEDC, 2009. http://dx.doi.org/10.1115/pvp2009-77392.

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VERLIFE – “Unified Procedure for Lifetime Assessment of Components and Piping in WWER NPPs during Operation” was developed within the 5th Framework Program of the European Union in 2003 and later upgraded within the 6th Framework Program project “COVERS – Safety of WWER NPPs” of the European Union in 2008. This Procedure has to fill the gap in original Soviet/Russian Codes and Rules for WWER type NPPs, as these codes were developed only for design and manufacture and were not changed since their second edition in 1989. VERLIFE Procedure is based on these Russian codes but incorporates also new developments in research, mainly in fracture mechanics, and also some principal approaches used in PWR codes. To assure that VERLIFE Procedure will remain a living document, new 3-year IAEA project (in close co-operation with another project 6th Framework Program of the European Union “NULIFE – Plant Life Management of NPPs”) has started in 2009. Within this project, upgrading/updating of the VERLIFE procedure is prepared together with the extension by following procedures: - Lifetime of reactor pressure vessel internals. - Leak-before-break concept for WWER NPPs. - No-break-zone for WWER NPPs. - Probabilistic approach for failure and lifetime assessment of WWER reactor pressure vessels and primary piping (including Risk-informed ISI). - Thermal fatigue evaluation. Final document, after its approval by expert groups of the IAEA and NULIFE, will be issued as “IAEA Guidelines for Integrity and Lifetime Assessment of Components and Piping in WWER NPPs”. The paper will describe these main principles and also future plans.
2

Brumovsky, Milan. "VERLIFE: Unified Procedure for Lifetime Assessment of Components and Piping in WWER NPPs During Operation—Updating and Further Development." In ASME 2010 Pressure Vessels and Piping Division/K-PVP Conference. ASMEDC, 2010. http://dx.doi.org/10.1115/pvp2010-25624.

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VERLIFE – “Unified Procedure for Lifetime Assessment of Components and Piping in WWER NPPs during Operation” was developed within the 5th Framework Programme of the European Union in 2003 and later upgraded within the 6th Framework Programme “COVERS – Safety of WWER NPPs” of the European Union in 2008. This Procedure has to fill the gap in original Soviet/Russian Codes and Rules for WWER type NPPs, as these codes were developed only for design and manufacture and were not changed since their second edition in 1989. VERLIFE Procedure is based on these Russian codes but incorporates also new developments in research, mainly in fracture mechanics, and also some principal approaches used in PWR codes. To assure that VERLIFE Procedure will remain a living document, new 3-year IAEA project (in close cooperation with the another project 6th Framework Programme of the European Union “NULIFE – Plant Life Management of NPPs”) has started in 2009. Within this project, upgrading/updating of the VERLIFE procedure is prepared together with the extension by (at least) following procedures: - Leak-before-break concept for WWER NPPs; - No-Break-Area Assessment Procedure for WWER Piping; - Lifetime of reactor pressure vessel internals; - Probabilistic approach for failure and lifetime assessment of WWER reactor pressure vessels and primary piping (including Risk-informed ISI); - Qualification of NDT procedures; - Supports of components and piping; - Monitoring and evaluation of erosion-corrosion damage in piping. Final document, after its approval by expert groups of the IAEA and NULIFE, will be issued as “IAEA/NULIFE Guidelines for Integrity and Lifetime Assessment of Components and Piping in WWER NPPs”. The paper will describe these main principles and also future plans.
3

Brumovsky, Milan. "VERLIFE - Unified Procedure for Lifetime Assessment of Components and Piping in WWER NPPs During Operation: Updating and Further Development." In 18th International Conference on Nuclear Engineering. ASMEDC, 2010. http://dx.doi.org/10.1115/icone18-30256.

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VERLIFE — “Unified Procedure for Lifetime Assessment of Components and Piping in WWER NPPs during Operation” was developed within the 5th Framework Program of the European Union in 2003 and later upgraded within the 6th Framework Program “COVERS – Safety of WWER NPPs” of the European Union in 2008. This Procedure had to fill the gap in original Soviet/Russian Codes and Rules for WWER type NPPs, as these codes were developed only for design and manufacturing and were not changed since their second edition in 1989. VERLIFE Procedure is based on these Russian codes but incorporates also new developments in research, mainly in fracture mechanics, and also some principal approaches used in PWR codes. To assure that VERLIFE Procedure will remain a living document, new 3-years IAEA project (in close co-operation with the another project 6th Framework Program of the European Union “NULIFE – Plant Life Management of NPPs”) has started in 2009. Within this project, upgrading/updating of the VERLIFE procedure is prepared together with the extension by (at least) following procedures: - Leak-before-break concept for WWER NPPs; - Reduction of Probability of Break procedure for evaluation of integrity of high-energy piping in NPPs of WWER-440 and WWER-1000 types; - Lifetime of reactor pressure vessel internals; - Risk informed In-service inspection implementation process and organization; - Methodology for Qualification of In-Service Inspection Systems for WWER Nuclear Power Plants; - Component and piping supports; - Monitoring and evaluation of erosion-corrosion damage in piping materials. Final document, after its approval by expert groups of the IAEA and NULIFE, will be issued as “IAEA/NULIFE Guidelines for Integrity and Lifetime Assessment of Components and Piping in WWER NPPs”. The paper will describe these main principles and also future plans.
4

Wrobel, Michal, Mark Richter, Rene Zimmermann, Holger Kiewel, and Andreas Ullrich. "Rotor Lifecycle Management Program." In ASME Turbo Expo 2014: Turbine Technical Conference and Exposition. American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 2014. http://dx.doi.org/10.1115/gt2014-26761.

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Minimizing the maintenance costs has become an ever growing topic in the power generation industry. Consequently, OEM’s constantly increase their efforts to exploit the full lifetime potential of capital intensive components, as for instance gas turbine rotors. More than ever, it is essential to have a closed loop from the design knowledge to solid facts about the actual condition of a gas turbine rotor in the field, in order to optimize the utilization and therefore to reduce total lifecycle costs. During initial design an iterative component design process is applied, comprising of analytical calculations and component and engine tests, to design a reliable, robust and maintenance friendly component. Individual component risk profiles (i.e. failure probability and consequences) have to be taken into account during the design phase to cover uncertainties regarding the operating regime, operating conditions and environment, resulting in the minimum expected lifetime. The lifetime of gas turbine components is limited and primarily depends on factors like the operating regime, dictating the mechanical and thermal loads, actual material properties, environmental conditions and the level of maintenance. Those parameters have a scatter and also interact with each other. As a consequence the progress of component degradation varies and the individual component lifetime isn’t known in detail at the time of the design. The purpose of a Rotor Lifecycle Management Program is to detect individual component degradation early in the lifecycle, in order to exploit the maximum rotor lifetime while ensuring safe operation. Periodic monitoring and condition assessment of the individual rotor is the first step, performed during standard type C inspections and comprising of visual inspection, dimensional and advanced non-destructive measurements. Typically the monitoring schedule is based on the operating regime and the operating history of the specific rotor. The combination of the monitoring results with validated analytical design models, extensive material data and the overall gas turbine rotor fleet experience of the OEM, allows proper planning of lifetime extension measures, such as repair and reconditioning activities. Specific repair solutions for both on-site and shop applications have been developed. A rotor lifecycle management program is a „living” program. The monitoring scope and schedule as well as the repair solutions portfolio are continuously optimized and adapted as a result of detailed analysis of operating data and inspection results of the whole global fleet.

Reports on the topic "Life (living, lifetime)":

1

Andrabi, Tahir, Benjamin Daniels, and Jishnu Das. Human Capital Accumulation and Disasters: Evidence from the Pakistan Earthquake of 2005. Research on Improving Systems of Education (RISE), May 2020. http://dx.doi.org/10.35489/bsg-risewp_2020/039.

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We trace the effects of a devastating earthquake that occurred in Northern Pakistan in 2005. Using a new dataset from a survey conducted four years after the earthquake, we first show that the distance of the household from the fault line was not correlated with pre-existing household characteristics, while it was strongly predictive of earthquake-related damage and mortality. Through emergency relief aid, households living close to the fault line reported receiving substantial cash compensation that amounted to as much as 150% of their annual household consumption expenditure. Four years after the earthquake, there were no differences in public infrastructure, household or adult outcomes between areas close to and far from the fault line. However, children in their critical first thousand days at the time of the earthquake accumulated large height deficits, with the youngest the most affected. Children aged 3 through 15 at the time of the earthquake did not suffer growth shortfalls, but scored significantly worse on academic tests if they lived close to the fault line. Finally, children whose mothers completed primary education were fully protected against the emergence of a test score gap. We estimate that if these deficits continue to adult life, the affected children could stand to lose 15% of their lifetime earnings. Even when disasters are heavily compensated, human capital accumulation can be critically interrupted, with greater losses for already disadvantaged populations.

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